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Austria

  • President:Dr. Alexander Van der Bellen
  • Chancellor:Brigitte Bierlein
  • Capital city:Vienna
  • Languages:German (official nationwide) 88.6%, Turkish 2.3%, Serbian 2.2%, Croatian (official in Burgenland) 1.6%, other (includes Slovene, official in South Carinthia, and Hungarian, official in Burgenland) 5.3% (2001 est.)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:8,847,037 (2018)
  • Area, sq km:82,523
  • GDP per capita, US$:51,513 (2018)
  • GDP, billion current US$:455.7 (2018)
  • GINI index:No data
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:26
All datasets:  A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T V W И П Р С
  • A
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 October, 2019
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      The indicator is defined as the percentage of the population aged 15-64 who are economically active. According to the definitions of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) people are classified as employed, unemployed and economically inactive for the purposes of labour market statistics. The economically active population (also called labour force) is the sum of employed and unemployed persons. Inactive persons are those who, during the reference week, were neither employed nor unemployed. The indicator is based on the EU Labour Force Survey.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side.nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side.nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side.nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • November 2019
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2019
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      AMECO is the annual macro-economic database of the European Commission's Directorate General for Economic and Financial Affairs. The database is indispensable for the analyses and reports of the Directorate General and contains data for EU-28, the euro area, EU Member States, candidate countries and other OECD countries. The database contains data for EU-28, the euro area, EU Member States, candidate countries and other OECD countries (United States, Japan, Canada, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Mexico, Korea, Australia and New Zealand). Data for Member States and candidate countries are based on the ESA 2010 system for the last period and on ESA 95 and ESA 79 for the earlier years. Data for other OECD countries are based on the SNA 2008. Discontinuities of the levels of all series have been removed by applying the growth rates of the old series to the levels of the new series.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2019
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      Data are the result of the annual structure of government debt survey and cover the EU countries as well as Norway. The following series are available: Central government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; State government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Local government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Social security funds gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; General government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Debt by currency of issuance; Government guarantees (contingent liabilities); Average remaining maturity of debt; Apparent cost of the debt; Market value of debt.
    • July 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
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      This data collection has been discontinued in 2012. Data is only available up to reference year 2011. Annual data on average gross earnings and related employment are included in the Gross earnings - Annual data collection. Data are available for EU Member States, Norway, Iceland and Switzerland. Data are also broken down by: From reference year 2008 onwards average gross annual earnings per employee are provided by economic activity (NACE Rev.2 aggregates and sections B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, B_TO_E, B_TO_F, B_TO_N, B_TO_S_NOT_O, B_TO_S, G_TO_J, G_TO_N, G_TO_S_NOT_O, K_TO_N, P_TO_S and O_TO_S)for enterprises with 1+ and for enterprises with 10+ employees for the following breakdowns:FTU= full-time units, FT=full-time workers, PT=part-time workers by Total, Men and Women. Before 2008: data is broken down by economic activity (NACE Rev. 1.1 for Sections C to K and the C-E, C-F, G-I, J-K, G-K, C-K and for some Member States L, M-O, L-O and also C-O aggregates) FTU= full-time units, FT=full-time workers, PT=part-time workersgenderoccupation (ISCO-88 classification, one-digit level and the 1-5 and 7-9 aggregates)The data relate to the staff of enterprises having at least 10 employees in most countries. Countries provide these annual data using several statistical sources mainly the four-yearly SES, the EU Labour Force Survey and/or administrative data.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data are the result of the annual structure of government debt survey and cover the EU countries as well as Norway. The following series are available: Central government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; State government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Local government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Social security funds gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; General government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Debt by currency of issuance; Government guarantees (contingent liabilities); Average remaining maturity of debt; Apparent cost of the debt; Market value of debt.
  • B
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 November, 2019
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      The Balance of Payments (BOP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, primary and secondary income), as well as on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. International investment position presents value of financial assets owned outside the economy and indebtedness of the economy to the rest of the world. BOP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit for current and capital acount, net acquisition of financial assets or net incurrence of liabilities for BOP financial account and international investment position) towards the external world. Out of BOP data, some indicators on international position of the EU and Member States are derived. Indicators on Main Balance of Payments and International Investment Position items as share of GDP are presented as percentage of GDP for given year or quarter and moving average for 3 consecutive years for: Balance, credit and debit flows of current and capital accounts and of main current account  items: goods, services, primary and secondary income,Net flows, net acquisition of financial assets and net incurrence of liabilities for total financial account and foreign direct investment,International investment position and net external debt at the end of reference quarter or year. Indicators on export market shares present shares of each EU Member State in total world exports of goods and services for given year, and 1-year and 5-year percentage changes of these shares, as well as shares in OECD exports and 5-year percentage changes of these shares.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments is the statistical statement that systematically summarises transactions between residents and non-residents. It consists of the goods and services account, the primary income account, the secondary income account, the capital account and the financial account (BPM6 – 2.12) The capital account in the international accounts shows a) capital transfers receivable and payable between residents and nonresidents and b) the acquisition and disposal of nonproduced, nonfinancial assets between residents and nonresidents (BPM6- 13.1). The capital transfers are transfers in which the ownership of an asset (other than cash or inventories) changes from one party to another. The sum of the balances on the current and capital accounts represents the net lending (surplus) or net borrowing (deficit) by the economy with the rest of the world (BPM6 – 2.18). Source of euro area data: European Central Bank (ECB).
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a geographical region during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services, a component of BoP current account, and data on Foreign Direct Investment, a component of BoP financial account, are used to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Outward Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FATS) measure the commercial presence, as defined by the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), through affiliates in foreign markets. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports.  Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU or in millions of national currency. Balance of Payments data coverage varies according to the collection. Some collections refer only to Euro area or EU countries, while some others' coverage includes also EU partner countries.   Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.    More information on BoP is available for each specific collection: Quarterly BoP, ITS, FDI, Outward FATS, BoP of EU Institutions.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments is the statistical statement that systematically summarises transactions between residents and non-residents. It consists of the goods and services account, the primary income account, the secondary income account, the capital account and the financial account (BPM6 – 2.12) The financial account shows net acquisition and disposal of financial assets and liabilities The financial account indicates the functional categories, sectors, instruments, and maturities used for net international financing transactions. (BPM6 – 8.1). Five functional categories of investment are distinguished in the international accounts: a) direct investment, b) portfolio investment, c) financial derivatives and employee stock options, d) other investment and e) reserve assets. (BPM6 – 6.1). Source of euro area data: European Central Bank (ECB).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts, annual and quarterly sector accounts as well as supply, use and input-output tables, which are each presented with associated metadata. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013.   The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information on the transition from ESA 95 to ESA 2010 is presented on the Eurostat website. The domain consists of the following collections:   1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by durability and exports and imports by origin. <
    • July 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 July, 2012
      Select Dataset
      This Dataset contains 3 Tables. Banks' balance sheet assets and liabilities - Annual data (mny_agg_a) Banks' balance sheet assets and liabilities - Quarterly data (mny_agg_q) Banks' balance sheet assets and liabilities - Monthly data (mny_agg_m). Note: Eurostat Hierarchy: Economy and finance > Monetary and other financial statistics (mny) > Monetary aggregates, counterparts, and other banks' balance sheet items (mny_agg).
    • September 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 May, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • November 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • November 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • November 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • March 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at: The World Bank https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ Topic: Jobs Publication: https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/jobs License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   The World Bank Jobs Statistics Over 150 indicators on labor-related topics, covering over 200 economies from 1990 to present.
  • C
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      % of material input for domestic useThe indicator measures the share of material recovered and fed back into the economy - thus saving extraction of primary raw materials - in overall material use. The circular material use (CMU) rate is defined as the ratio of the circular use of materials to the overall material use.The overall material use is measured by summing up the aggregate domestic material consumption (DMC) and the circular use of materials. DMC is defined in economy-wide material flow accounts. The circular use of materials is approximated by the amount of waste recycled in domestic recovery plants minus imported waste destined for recovery plus exported waste destined for recovery abroad. Waste recycled in domestic recovery plants comprises the recovery operations R2 to R11 - as defined in the Waste Framework Directive 75/442/EEC. The imports and exports of waste destined for recycling - i.e. the amount of imported and exported waste bound for recovery – are approximated from the European statistics on international trade in goods.  A higher CMU rate value means that more secondary materials substitute for primary raw materials thus reducing the environmental impacts of extracting primary material.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The indicator Compensation of employees sources from the National accounts domain. Under the MIP context it is used for the calculation of the indicator Unit labour cost index. National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts data. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The indicator Compensation of employees sources from the National accounts domain. Under the MIP context it is used for the calculation of the indicator Unit labour cost index. National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts data. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards.
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Domestic material consumption (DMC) measures the total amount of materials directly used by an economy and is defined as the annual quantity of raw materials extracted from the domestic territory of the focal economy, plus all physical imports minus all physical exports. The indicator Domestic Material Consumption (DMC) is based on the Economy-wide Material Flow Accounts (EW-MFA). The theory of Economy-wide material flow accounts (EW-MFA) includes compilations of the overall material inputs into national economy, the changes of material stock within the economy and the material outputs to other economies or to the environment. EW-MFA covers all solid, gaseous, and liquid materials, except water and air. Water included in products is included. The three main components of the DMC are:   - the raw materials domestically extracted (domestic extraction);   - the total import;   - the total export. It is important to note that the term "consumption" as used in DMC denotes apparent consumption and not final consumption. DMC does not include upstream hidden flows (materials that are extracted or moved, but do not enter the economy) related to imports and exports of raw materials and products. The indicator provides a basis for policies to decouple the growth of the economy from the use of natural resources so as to achieve a reduction of environment degradation resulting from primary production, material processing, manufacturing and waste disposal. DMC is a useful indicator, as it provides an assessment of the absolute level of use of resources and allows distinguishing consumption driven by domestic demand from consumption driven by the export market. Combined with GDP, it also provides insight into whether decoupling between the use of natural resources and growth of the economy is taking place.   The indicator is a Sustainable Development Indicator (SDI). It has been chosen for the assessment of the progress towards the objectives and targets of the EU Sustainable Development Strategy.   tsdpc220´s table: Eurobase > Tables by themes > Environment and energy > Environment > Environmental accounts > Components of domestic material consumption (tsdpc220) tsdpc220´s table within the SDI set: Eurobase > Tables on EU policy > Sustainable Development Indicators > Sustainable consumption and production > Resource use and waste > Components of domestic material consumption (tsdpc220)
    • November 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Statistical population: CLIs are calculated for 33 OECD countries (Iceland is not included), 6 non-member economies and 8 zone aggregates. A country CLI comprises a set of component series selected from a wide range of key short-term economic indicators.   CLIs, reference series data (see below) and standardised business and consumer confidence indicators are presented in various forms.   Recommended uses and limitations: The composite leading indicator is a times series, formed by aggregating a variety of component indicators which show a reasonably consistent relationship with a reference series (e.g. industrial production IIP up to March 2012 and since then the reference series is GDP) at turning points. The OECD CLI is designed to provide qualitative information on short-term economic movements, especially at the turning points, rather than quantitative measures. Therefore, the main message of CLI movements over time is the increase or decrease, rather than the amplitude of the changes. The OECD’s headline indicator is the amplitude adjusted CLI. In practice, turning points in the de-trended reference series have been found about 4 to 8 months (on average) after the signals of turning points had been detected in the headline CLI.
    • November 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The 'Consumer Price Indices (CPIs)' contains all data that was previously contained in three different datasets: 'Consumer Prices', 'National Consumer Price Indices (CPIs) by COICOP divisions' and 'Harmonised Indices of Consumer Prices (HICPs) by COICOP divisions'. The 'Consumer Price Indices (CPIs)' dataset contains predominantly monthly statistics, and associated statistical methodological information, for the 36 OECD member countries and for some non-member countries. The ‘Consumer Price Indices (CPIs)' dataset contains statistics on Consumer Price Indices including national CPIs, Harmonised Indices of Consumer Prices (HICPs) and their associated weights and contributions to national annual inflation. The data series presented have been chosen as the most relevant prices statistics for which comparable data across countries is available. In all cases, a lot of effort has been made to ensure that the data are internationally comparable across all countries presented and that all the subjects have good historical time-series’ data to aid with analysis. Data are available monthly for all the countries except for Australia and New Zealand (quarterly data).
    • January 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 February, 2019
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      For the countries belonging to the euro area, these are factors for converting euro fixed series (NAC) into euro/ECU series, and vice-versa.
    • December 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 February, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Correction coefficients (countries) are used to ensure equality of purchasing power of remuneration between different locations within the European Union and Belgium. Correction coefficients are calculated as the ratio between the "economic parity" and the exchange rate to the Euro (where applicable). They operate as a percentage adjustment to remuneration expressed in local currency. As the correction coefficient is simply the economic parity divided by the exchange rate, it can be seen that the exchange rate effect cancels out and the economic parity is the appropriate conversion rate to convert amounts expressed in local currency into Euro and eliminate the effect of price level differences. The economic parity tells us how many currency units a given quantity of goods and services costs in different countries. The method used to establish economic parities is to compare the price of a basket of goods and services purchased by the average retired international official in Belgium with the price of an equivalent basket of goods and services purchased by the average retired international official in each of the other countries. To compile these prices, Eurostat carry out a number of detailed price surveys in cooperation with national statistical institutes. The same source data is used as for the similar exercise to establish correction coefficients for active staff in Intra-EU duty stations, however it is processed separately. For each item, the price ratio with Belgium is computed. Similar items are grouped into "basic headings", and a geometric mean of the price ratios is calculated to establish a basic heading parity. These basic heading parities are then aggregated to produce an overall parity. This aggregate is computed as a weighted arithmetic mean, using consumption expenditure pattern of international officials as weights.
    • April 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Sandeep Reddy
      Accessed On: 20 August, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Global growth is forecast at 3.5 percent in 2015 and 3.8 percent in 2016, with uneven prospects across the main countries and regions of the world. The distribution of risks to near-term global growth has become more balanced relative to the October World Economic Outlook but is still tilted to the downside. The decline in oil prices could boost activity more than expected. Geopolitical tensions continue to pose threats, and risks of disruptive shifts in asset prices remain relevant. In some advanced economies, protracted low inflation or deflation also pose risks to activity. The chapter takes a region-by-region look at the recent development in the world economy and the outlook for 2015, with particular attention to notable development in countries within each region.
    • November 2019
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Source: UNECE Statistical Database, compiled from national and international official sources. Area data exclude overseas departments and territories. For population footnotes click here. For life expectancy footnotes click here. For fertility rate footnotes click here. For population by marital status footnotes click here. For female members of parliament footnotes click here. For female government ministers footnotes click here. For female central bank board members footnotes click here. For female tertiary students footnotes click here. For economic activity rate footnotes click here. For gender pay gap footnotes click here. For employment growth rate footnotes click here. For unemployment rate footnotes click here. For youth unemployment rate footnotes click here. For employment by economic sector footnotes click here. For economic indicator footnotes click here. For road accident footnotes click here. For total length of motorways footnotes click here. For total length of railway lines footnotes click here. Key indicators in maps .. - data not availableIndicatorGDP in agriculture (ISIC4 A): output approach, index, 2010=100If the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP in industry (incl. construction) (ISIC4 B-F): output approach, index, 2010=100If the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP in services (ISIC4 G-U): output approach, index, 2010=100If the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in agriculture etc. (ISIC4 A), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in industry etc. (ISIC4 B-E), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in construction (ISIC4 F), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in trade, hospitality, transport and communication (ISIC4 G-J), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in finance and business services (ISIC4 K-N), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in public administration, education and health (ISIC4 O-Q), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in other service activities (ISIC4 R-U), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing (ISIC Rev. 4 A), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in industry and energy (ISIC Rev. 4 B-E), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in construction (ISIC Rev. 4 F), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in trade, hotels, restaurants, transport and communications (ISIC Rev. 4 G-J), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in finance, real estate and business services (ISIC Rev. 4 K-N), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in public administration, education and health (ISIC Rev. 4 O-Q), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in other service activities (ISIC Rev. 4 R-U), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.
    • March 2012
      Source: Knoema
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Select Dataset
      Country Risk Assessment Database, 2012. Source: Multiple Sources - EuroStat, WB, IMF, OECD, UNCTAD
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a geographical region during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services, a component of BoP current account, and data on Foreign Direct Investment, a component of BoP financial account, are used to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Outward Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FATS) measure the commercial presence, as defined by the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), through affiliates in foreign markets. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports.  Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU or in millions of national currency. Balance of Payments data coverage varies according to the collection. Some collections refer only to Euro area or EU countries, while some others' coverage includes also EU partner countries.   Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide 2003. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.    More information on BoP is available for each specific collection: Quarterly BoP, ITS, FDI, Outward FATS, BoP of EU Institutions.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The balance of payments is a record of a country's international transactions with the rest of the world. It is composed of the current account and the capital and financial account. The current account is itself subdivided into goods, services, income and current transfers; it registers the value of exports (credits) and imports (debits). The difference between these two values is the "balance".
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The balance of payments is a record of a country's international transactions with the rest of the world. The balance of payments is composed of two broad sub-balances: the current account and the capital and financial account. The current account is itself subdivided into four basic components: goods, services, income and current transfers. For each of these items, the current account registers the value of exports (credits) and imports (debits). The difference between these two values is the "balance".
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The balance of payments is a record of a country's international transactions with the rest of the world. The balance of payments is composed by two broad sub-balances: the current account and the capital and financial account. The current account is itself subdivided into four basic components: goods, services, income and current transfers. For each of these items, the current account registers the value of exports (credits) and imports (debits). The difference between these two values is the balance.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The balance of payments is a record of a country's international transactions with the rest of the world. It is composed of the current account and the capital and financial account. The current account is itself subdivided into goods, services, income and current transfers; it registers the value of exports (credits) and imports (debits). The difference between these two values is the "balance".
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Detailed tax and social contribution receipts by type of tax or social contribution and by sub-sector of general government, notified by national authorities in line with Table 0900 of the ESA 95 transmission programme. Data are presented in euro/ECU, national currency units and as percentages of GDP. Geographic coverage: EU and euro area, Norway, Switzerland and Iceland. Main sources of data: National authorities.
  • D
    • March 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 July, 2012
      Select Dataset
      This dataset contains 12 tables. Debt securities of euro area residents: euro-denominated issues - Annual data (mny_bmk_erseu_a); Debt securities of euro area residents: euro-denominated issues - Quarterly data (mny_bmk_erseu_q); Debt securities of euro area residents: euro-denominated issues - Monthly data (mny_bmk_erseu_m); Debt securities of euro area residents: issues in other currencies - Annual data (mny_bmk_erscu_a); Debt securities of euro area residents: issues in other currencies - Quarterly data (mny_bmk_erscu_q); Debt securities of euro area residents: issues in other currencies - Monthly data (mny_bmk_erscu_m); Debt securities of euro area residents: issues in all currencies - Annual data (mny_bmk_ersto_a); Debt securities of euro area residents: issues in all currencies - Quarterly data (mny_bmk_ersto_q); Debt securities of euro area residents: issues in all currencies - Monthly data (mny_bmk_ersto_m); Debt securities of non-euro area residents: euro-denominated issues - Annual data (mny_bmk_ners_a); Debt securities of non-euro area residents: euro-denominated issues - Quarterly data (mny_bmk_ners_q); Debt securities of non-euro area residents: euro-denominated issues - Monthly data (mny_bmk_ners_m). Note: Eurostat Hierarchy : Economy and finance > Monetary and other financial statistics (mny) > Debt securities of euro area residents (mny_bmk_ers)
    • January 2018
      Source: The Fletcher School,Tufts University
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 August, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The DEI 2017 is a data-driven holistic evaluation of the progress of the digital economy across 60 countries, combining more than 100 different indicators across four key drivers: Supply Conditions, Demand Conditions, Institutional Environment, and Innovation and Change. The resulting framework captures both the state and rate of digital evolution and identifies implications for investment, innovation, and policy priorities. DEI 2017 also highlights the evolving nature of the risks being created by our continuing reliance on digital technology. Towards this end, the study covers a key question of “digital trust.“ The DEI 2017 incorporates a newly devised analysis of digital trust that takes into account the trustworthiness of the digital environment for each country; the quality of users’ experience; attitudes towards key institutions and organizations; and users’ behavior when they interact with the digital world. This subject is of great interest to all participants in the digital economy, given the concerns about security of essential information, cyber-attacks, and consumers’ apprehensions—about the digital systems and their reliability, the digital companies and their growing dominance, and about the leaders of digital companies. The DEI framework segments the 60 countries into Stand Outs, Stall Outs, Break Outs and Watch Outs. Three countries are notable as standouts even within the Stand Out segment: Singapore, New Zealand, and the UAE. Each has a unique policy-led digital strategy and a narrative that may be considered by other nations as worthy of emulation or adoption. The Nordic countries and Switzerland are at the top of the DEI 2017 rankings. China, once again, tops the list of countries in terms of the pace of change in its digital evolution, or momentum.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The international investment position (IIP) is a statistical statement that provides an aggregate view of the net financial position (assets minus liabilities) of a country vis-à-vis the rest of the world. It allows for a stock-flow analysis of external position of a country. It shows at a point in time the value and composition of: financial assets of residents of an economy that are claims on non-residents and gold bullion held as reserve assets, andliabilities of residents of an economy to non-residents. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the net international investment position expressed as % of GDP. Additionally are published data for the different functional categories (Direct investment; Portfolio investment; Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options (ESOs) and Other investment) in % of GDP and national currency.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The international investment position (IIP) is a statistical statement that provides an aggregate view of the net financial position (assets minus liabilities) of a country vis-à-vis the rest of the world. It allows for a stock-flow analysis of external position of a country. It shows at a point in time the value and composition of: financial assets of residents of an economy that are claims on non-residents and gold bullion held as reserve assets, andliabilities of residents of an economy to non-residents. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the net international investment position expressed as % of GDP. Additionally are published data for the different functional categories (Direct investment; Portfolio investment; Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options (ESOs) and Other investment) in % of GDP and national currency.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The international investment position (IIP) is a statistical statement that provides an aggregate view of the net financial position (assets minus liabilities) of a country vis-à-vis the rest of the world. It allows for a stock-flow analysis of external position of a country. It shows at a point in time the value and composition of: financial assets of residents of an economy that are claims on non-residents and gold bullion held as reserve assets, andliabilities of residents of an economy to non-residents. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the net international investment position expressed as % of GDP. Additionally are published data for the different functional categories (Direct investment; Portfolio investment; Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options (ESOs) and Other investment) in % of GDP and national currency.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The international investment position (IIP) is a statistical statement that provides an aggregate view of the net financial position (assets minus liabilities) of a country vis-à-vis the rest of the world. It allows for a stock-flow analysis of external position of a country. It shows at a point in time the value and composition of: financial assets of residents of an economy that are claims on non-residents and gold bullion held as reserve assets, andliabilities of residents of an economy to non-residents. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the net international investment position expressed as % of GDP. Additionally are published data for the different functional categories (Direct investment; Portfolio investment; Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options (ESOs) and Other investment) in % of GDP and national currency.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      18.1. Source data
  • E
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Economic Accounts for Agriculture (EAA) provide detailed information on income in the agricultural sector. The purpose is to analyse the production process of the agricultural industry and the primary income generated by this production. The accounts are therefore based on the industry concept. The EAA accounts are detailed data on value of output (producer prices and basic prices), intermediate consumption, subsidies and taxes, consumption of fixed capital, rent and interests, capital formation etc. The values are in current as well as in constant prices. Agricultural Labour Input (ALI) and Unit Values (UV) are an integrated part of the overall concept of Economic Accounts for Agriculture. The Economic accounts for agriculture (EAA) are a satellite account of the European System of Accounts (ESA2010), providing complementary information and concepts adapted to the particular nature of the agricultural industry. Although their structure very closely matches that of the national accounts, their compilation requires the formulation of appropriate rules and methods. National Statistical Institutes or Ministries of Agriculture are responsible for data collection and calculation of national EAA, in accordance with EC Regulations. Eurostat is responsible for the EU aggregations. Regional data EAA accounts are compiled at regional level (NUTS2), but only in values in current prices. The labour input data and Unit values are not broken down to regional level. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data. Frequency of data collection for data under Regulation (EC) 138/2004 and gentlemen's agreement, deadline for transmission for years 2015-2016.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Economic Accounts for Agriculture (EAA) provide detailed information on income in the agricultural sector. The purpose is to analyse the production process of the agricultural industry and the primary income generated by this production. The accounts are therefore based on the industry concept. The EAA accounts are detailed data on value of output (producer prices and basic prices), intermediate consumption, subsidies and taxes, consumption of fixed capital, rent and interests, capital formation etc. The values are in current as well as in constant prices. Agricultural Labour Input (ALI) and Unit Values (UV) are an integrated part of the overall concept of Economic Accounts for Agriculture. The Economic accounts for agriculture (EAA) are a satellite account of the European System of Accounts (ESA2010), providing complementary information and concepts adapted to the particular nature of the agricultural industry. Although their structure very closely matches that of the national accounts, their compilation requires the formulation of appropriate rules and methods. National Statistical Institutes or Ministries of Agriculture are responsible for data collection and calculation of national EAA, in accordance with EC Regulations. Eurostat is responsible for the EU aggregations. Regional data EAA accounts are compiled at regional level (NUTS2), but only in values in current prices. The labour input data and Unit values are not broken down to regional level. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data. Frequency of data collection for data under Regulation (EC) 138/2004 and gentlemen's agreement, deadline for transmission for years 2015-2016.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 May, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Economic Accounts for Agriculture (EAA) provide detailed information on income in the agricultural sector. The purpose is to analyse the production process of the agricultural industry and the primary income generated by this production. The accounts are therefore based on the industry concept. The EAA are detailed data on the value of output (measured in both producer prices and basic prices), intermediate consumption, subsidies and taxes, consumption of fixed capital, rent and interest, capital formation etc. The values are available in both current prices and constant prices. Agricultural Labour Input (ALI) statistics and Unit Values (UV) are an integrated part of the overall concept of the EAA. The EAA are a satellite account of the European System of Accounts (ESA), providing complementary information and concepts adapted to the particular nature of the agricultural industry. Although their structure very closely matches that of the national accounts, their compilation requires the formulation of appropriate rules and methods. National Statistical Institutes or Ministries of Agriculture are responsible for data collection and calculations of national EAA, in accordance with EC Regulations. Eurostat is responsible for the EU aggregations. Regional data The EAA are also compiled at regional level (NUTS2), but only in values at current prices. The agricultural labour input data and unit values, however, are not available at regional levels. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for national data. Frequency of data collection for data under Regulation (EC) 138/2004 and gentlemen's agreement l
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The economic accounts for forestry and logging are based on national accounts, but are collected with greater detail. Current prices means prices of that particular year. Annual inflation must yet be taken into account if one wishes to compare the values of different years. Basic prices means the price received by the producer after deduction of all taxes on products, but including all subsidies on products. Gross value added is the value of the output less the value of intermediate consumption. Fixed capital relates to longer-lived assets (e.g. equipment or buildings) that are either acquired (this is gross fixed capital formation) or consumed (this is fixed capital consumption, the annual reduction in the value of fixed assets). The definition of the activity of forestry and logging is based on Division 02 of NACE Rev. 2.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat's database covers 1) Production and trade in roundwood and wood products, including primary and secondary products 2) Economic data on forestry and logging, including employment data 3) Sustainable forest management, comprising forest resources (assets) and environmental data. The main types of primary forest products included in (1) are: roundwood, sawnwood, wood-based panels, pulp, and paper and paperboard. Secondary products include further processed wood and paper products. These products are presented in greater detail; definitions are available. All of the data are compiled from the Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire (JFSQ), except for table (e), which is directly extracted from Eurostat's international trade database COMEXT (HS/CN Chapter 44). The tables in (1) cover details of the following topics: - Roundwood removals and production by type of wood and assortment (a) - Roundwood production by type of ownership (b) - Production and trade in roundwood, fuelwood and other basic products (c) - Trade in industrial roundwood by assortment and species (d) - Tropical wood imports to the EU from Chapter 44 of the Harmonised System (e) - Production and trade in sawnwood, panels and other primary products (f) - Sawnwood trade by species (g) - Production and trade in pulp and paper & paperboard (h) - Trade in secondary wood and paper products (i) Data in (2) include the output, intermediate consumption, gross value added, fixed capital consumption, gross fixed capital formation and different measures of income of forestry and logging.  The data are in current basic prices and are compatible with National Accounts. They are collected as part of Intergrated environmental and economic accounting for forests (IEEAF), which also covers labour input in annual work units (AWU).  Under (2), two separate tables cover the number of employees of forestry and logging, the manufacture of wood and products of wood and cork, and the manufacture of paper and paper products, as estimated from the Labour Force Survey results. There are two separate tables because of the change in the EU's classification of economic activities from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 in 2008. More detailed information on wood products and accounting, including definitions and questionnaires, can be found on our open-access communication platform under the interest group 'Forestry statistics and accounts'.  Data in (3) are not collected by Eurostat, but by the FAO, UNECE, Forest Euope, the European Commission's departments for Environment and the Joint Research Centre. They include forest area, wood volume, defoliation on sample plots, fires and areas with protective functions.
    • September 2019
      Source: Fraser Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 September, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at: "Economic Freedom of the World: 2019 Annual Report"@Fraser Institute   The economic freedom index measures the degree of economic freedom present in five major areas: [1] Size of Government; [2] Legal System and Security of Property Rights; [3] Sound Money; [4] Freedom to Trade Internationally; [5] Regulation. Within the five major areas, there are 24 components (area) in economic freedom index. Each component and sub-component is placed on a scale from 0 to 10.
    • April 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The OECD Long-Term Baseline Scenario is a projection of some major economic variables beyond the short-term horizon of the OECD Economic Outlook. It covers all OECD economies, non-OECD G20 economies and key partners. The projection horizon is currently 2060. For the historical period and the short-run projection horizon, the series are consistent with those of the OECD Economic Outlook number in the dataset title. The definitions, sources and methods are also the same, except where noted explicitly (such as coverage of the non-OECD and world aggregates). For more details on the methodology, please see Boxes 1 to 3 in The Long View: Scenarios for the World Economy to 2060 and the references therein.The baseline scenario is a projection conditional on a number of assumptions, notably that countries do not carry out institutional and policy reforms. It is used as a reference point to illustrate the potential impact of structural reforms in alternative scenarios, such as those discussed in The Long View: Scenarios for the World Economy to 2060. The data for these alternative scenarios are not available here but can be obtained on request by writing to EcoOutlook@oecd.org.
    • November 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The OECD Economic Outlook analyses the major economic trends over the coming 2 years. It provides in-depth coverage of the main economic issues and the policy measures required to foster growth in each member country. Forthcoming developments in major non-OECD economies are also evaluated in detail. Each edition of the Outlook provides a unique resource to keep abreast of world economic developments. The OECD Economic Outlook database is a comprehensive and consistent macroeconomic database of the OECD economies, covering expenditures, foreign trade, output, labour markets, interest and exchange rates, balance of payments, and government debt. For the non-OECD regions, foreign trade and current account series are available.   The database contains annual data (for all variables) and quarterly figures (for a subset of variables). Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible for the countries covered. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD data bases such as Quarterly National Accounts, Annual National Accounts, Labour Force Statistics and Main Economic Indicators. The cut-off date for information used in the compilation of the projections was the 15 May 2019.   Concerning the aggregation of world trade, a new composition has been introduced, since projections are now made for the major non-OECD economies. Thus, besides OECD and the OECD euro area, the following new regions are available: Dynamic Asian Economies (Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam); Oil Producers (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Brunei, Timor-Leste, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Algeria, Angola, Chad, Rep. of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Sudan); with the remaining countries in a residual 'Rest of the World' group.
    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 April, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The OECD Economic Outlook analyses the major economic trends over the coming 2 to 3 years. It provides in-depth coverage of the main economic issues and the policy measures required to foster growth in each member country. Forthcoming developments in major non-OECD economies are also evaluated in detail. Each edition of this Outlook provides a unique tool to keep abreast of world economic developments. The OECD Economic Outlook database is a comprehensive and consistent macroeconomic database of the OECD economies, covering expenditures, foreign trade, output, labour markets, interest rates and exchange rates, the balance of payments, government and of households, and government debt. For the non-OECD regions, foreign trade and current account series are available. The database contains annual and quarterly data for the historical period and for the projection period. For this latter period, quarterly data are available for the G7 countries, and the OECD regions, while annual data are available for all OECD countries and for non-OECD regions. Quarterly series are seasonally adjusted. Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible over the countries. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD statistical publications such as the Quarterly National Accounts, the Annual National Accounts, the Annual Labour Force Statistics and the Main Economic Indicators.
    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 April, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The OECD Economic Outlook analyses the major economic trends over the coming 2 to 3 years. It provides in-depth coverage of the main economic issues and the policy measures required to foster growth in each member country. Forthcoming developments in major non-OECD economies are also evaluated in detail. Each edition of the Outlook provides a unique resource to keep abreast of world economic developments. The OECD Economic Outlook database is a comprehensive and consistent macroeconomic database of the OECD economies, covering expenditures, foreign trade, output, labour markets, interest and exchange rates, balance of payments, and government debt. For the non-OECD regions, foreign trade and current account series are available. The database contains annual for the projection period. Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible for the countries covered. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD statistical publications such as the Quarterly National Accounts, the Annual National Accounts, the Annual Labour Force Statistics and the Main Economic Indicators. The cut-off date for information used in the compilation of the projections was the 15 May 2013. With the OECD Economic Outlook 87, new aggregation techniques have been applied to construct the OECD area (34 countries) and the OECD euro area (15 OECD countries that are also members of Euro area). The new approach aims to better handle issues arising from evolving composition of these areas and different data availability across countries. The main changes are a switch from a fixed weighting scheme to moving weighting schemes for OECD and the direct aggregation of ratios, rather than computing them as ratios of aggregated components. Consequently, a number of series expressed in levels differ from the series previously published, while others are no longer available, particularly government and labour market data. Concerning the aggregation of world trade, a new composition has been introduced, since projections are now made for the major non-OECD economies. Thus, besides OECD and the OECD euro area, the following new regions are available: Dynamic Asian Economies (Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam); Oil Producers (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Brunei, Timor-Leste, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Algeria, Angola, Chad, Rep. of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Sudan); with the remaining countries in a residual 'Rest of the World' group.
    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 April, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The OECD Economic Outlook analyses the major economic trends over the coming 2 to 3 years. It provides in-depth coverage of the main economic issues and the policy measures required to foster growth in each member country. Forthcoming developments in major non-OECD economies are also evaluated in detail. Each edition of the Outlook provides a unique resource to keep abreast of world economic developments. The OECD Economic Outlook database is a comprehensive and consistent macroeconomic database of the OECD economies, covering expenditures, foreign trade, output, labour markets, interest and exchange rates, balance of payments, and government debt. For the non-OECD regions, foreign trade and current account series are available. The database contains annual for the projection period. Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible for the countries covered. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD statistical publications such as the Quarterly National Accounts, the Annual National Accounts, the Labour Force Statistics and the Main Economic Indicators. The cut-off date for information used in the compilation of the projections was the 29 May 2015. Concerning the aggregation of world trade, a new composition has been introduced, since projections are now made for the major non-OECD economies. Thus, besides OECD and the OECD euro area, the following new regions are available: Dynamic Asian Economies (Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam); Oil Producers (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Brunei, Timor-Leste, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Algeria, Angola, Chad, Rep. of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Sudan); with the remaining countries in a residual 'Rest of the World' group.
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The OECD Economic Outlook analyses the major economic trends over the coming 2 to 3 years. It provides in-depth coverage of the main economic issues and the policy measures required to foster growth in each member country. Forthcoming developments in major non-OECD economies are also evaluated in detail. Each edition of the Outlook provides a unique resource to keep abreast of world economic developments. The OECD Economic Outlook database is a comprehensive and consistent macroeconomic database of the OECD economies, covering expenditures, foreign trade, output, labour markets, interest and exchange rates, balance of payments, and government debt. For the non-OECD regions, foreign trade and current account series are available. The database contains annual for the projection period. Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible for the countries covered. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD statistical publications such as the Quarterly National Accounts, the Annual National Accounts, the Labour Force Statistics and the Main Economic Indicators. The cut-off date for information used in the compilation of the projections was the 29 May 2015. Concerning the aggregation of world trade, a new composition has been introduced, since projections are now made for the major non-OECD economies. Thus, besides OECD and the OECD euro area, the following new regions are available: Dynamic Asian Economies (Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam); Oil Producers (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Brunei, Timor-Leste, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Algeria, Angola, Chad, Rep. of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Sudan); with the remaining countries in a residual 'Rest of the World' group.
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • February 2019
      Source: National Institute of Statistics, Italy
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 February, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data source(s) used: Data source: OECD Education at a glance (annually published) containing detailed analysis of several internationally comparable indicators of human capital.For further details please see the volume on the site: www.oecd.org
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published:as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The section 'LFS series - detailed quarterly survey results' reports detailed quarterly results going beyond the EU-LFS main aggregates, which have a separate data domain and some methodological differences. This data collection covers all main labour market characteristics, i.e. the total population, activity and activity rates, employment, employment rates, self employed, employees, temporary employment, full-time and part-time employment, population in employment having a second job, working time, total unemployment and inactivity. General information on the EU-LFS can be found in the ESMS page for 'Employment and unemployment (LFS)', see link in related metada. Detailed information on the main features, the legal basis, the methodology and the data as well as on the historical development of the EU-LFS is available on the EU-LFS (Statistics Explained) webpage.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      In the MIP context the indicators Employment and Employees are used for the calculation of the Unit labour cost index. Both Employment and Employees source from the National accounts domain. National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts data. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards.
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The section 'LFS series - detailed annual survey results' reports annual results from the EU-LFS. While LFS is a quarterly survey, it is also possible to produce annual results. There are several ways of doing it, see section '20.5 Data compilation' below for details. This data collection covers all main labour market characteristics, i.e. the total population, activity and activity rates, employment, employment rates, self employed, employees, temporary employment, full-time and part-time employment, population in employment having a second job, working time, total unemployment and inactivity. General information on the EU-LFS can be found in the ESMS page for 'Employment and unemployment (LFS)', see link in related metada. Detailed information on the main features, the legal basis, the methodology and the data as well as on the historical development of the EU-LFS is available on the EU-LFS (Statistics Explained) webpage.
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The section 'LFS series - detailed quarterly survey results' reports detailed quarterly results going beyond the EU-LFS main aggregates, which have a separate data domain and some methodological differences. This data collection covers all main labour market characteristics, i.e. the total population, activity and activity rates, employment, employment rates, self employed, employees, temporary employment, full-time and part-time employment, population in employment having a second job, working time, total unemployment and inactivity. General information on the EU-LFS can be found in the ESMS page for 'Employment and unemployment (LFS)', see link in related metada. Detailed information on the main features, the legal basis, the methodology and the data as well as on the historical development of the EU-LFS is available on the EU-LFS (Statistics Explained) webpage.
    • June 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      In 2011, the European Union Labour Force Survey (EU-LFS) included an ad hoc module (AHM) on employment of disabled people. The module consisted of 11 variables dealing with: Health problems and difficulties in basic activities;Limitations in work caused by health problems/difficulties in basic activities;Special assistance needed or used by people with health problems/difficulties in basic activities;Limitation in work because of other reasons. On the basis of how the module was operationalised, the following two main definitions for disability were considered for presenting the results: Disabled persons = People having a basic activity difficulty (such as seeing, hearing, walking, communicating);Disabled persons = People having a work limitation caused by a longstanding health condition and/or a basic activity difficulty. 32 countries have implemented this module: the EU 28 Member States plus Turkey, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. The Norwegian data are not disseminated because the AHM questionnaire in Norway only partly complies with the Commission Regulation (EU) No 317/2010 and consequently, the data are incomplete and partly comparable. Missing values, don't know and refusal answers are not considered in the calculations. It means the indicators have been worked out on the respondents and validated answers only.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      In the MIP context the indicators Employment and Employees are used for the calculation of the Unit labour cost index. Both Employment and Employees source from the National accounts domain. National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts data. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      In the MIP context the indicators Employment and Employees are used for the calculation of the Unit labour cost index. Both Employment and Employees source from the National accounts domain. National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts data. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards.
    • April 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 April, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The indicator is the ratio between the Gross Inland Consumption of Energy and the Gross Domestic Product calculated for a calendar year. It measures the energy consumption of an economy and its overall energy efficiency. The Gross Inland Consumption of Energy is calculated as the sum of the Gross Inland Consumption of the five types of energy: coal, electricity, oil, natural gas and renewable energy sources. In addition, each of these figures is calculated as an aggregation of different data on production, storage, trade (imports/exports) and consumption/use of energy. The GDP figures are taken at chain-linked volumes, reference year 2005 (at 2005 exchange rates). The energy intensity ratio is the result of dividing the Gross Inland Consumption by the GDP. Since Gross Inland Consumption is measured in kgoe (kilogram of oil equivalent) and GDP in 1000 EUR, this ratio is measured in kgoe per 1000 EUR. All necessary data related to energy data is compiled through five annual Joint Questionnaires (one for each type of energy above-mentioned). These questionnaires are called « joint » because they are shared by Eurostat and the International Energy Agency (organisation that belongs to the OECD). The indicator is a Sustainable Development Indicators, as it has been chosen for the assessment of the EU progress towards the targets of the Sustainable Development Strategy. tsdec360 table within the SDI set: Eurobase>Tables on EU policy> Socio-economic Development > Innovation, competitiveness and eco-efficiency > Energy Intensity of the economy (tsdec 360)
    • December 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • July 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • December 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 September, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment:Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery.Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time.Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three:Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows.Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely:Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares.Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows.Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators:FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • July 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment: Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery. Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time. Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three: Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows. Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely: Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares. Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows. Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators: FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
       Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) encompasses all kind of cross-border investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). FDI is one of the five main functional categories of investment used in international accounts to classify either the Internal Investment Positions (IIP) or the Balance of Payment (BOP) statements of a given economy (vis-à-vis the rest of the world). Foreign Direct Investment positions show at a point in time (generally, end of a reference year) the value of financial direct investment assets of residents of an economy on non-residents, and financial direct investment liabilities of residents of an economy to non-resident. The net FDI position is the difference between assets and liabilities, which is also equivalent (under the directional principle presentation) to the difference between FDI positions abroad and in the reporting economy. The net FDI position represents either a net FDI claim or a net FDI liability to the rest of the world.        Foreign direct investment transactions summarize all economic direct investment interactions between the residents and the non-residents during a given period. Two types of FDI transactions can be identified (within the BOP framework) according to the economic meaning they convey: FDI income is a distributive transaction showing amounts payable and receivable between resident and non-resident entities in return for providing financial direct investment assets to the rest of the world, or incurring direct investment liabilities vis-à-vis the rest of the world.FDI flows refer to financial transactions showing the net acquisition or disposal of financial assets and liabilities involved in direct investment relationships.FDI positions, FDI income and FDI flows are disseminated by Eurostat together with estimated EU FDI aggregates (directly produced by Eurostat).  Other FDI changes that are not transaction changes, such as volume, value or prices changes, are not treated by Eurostat under the scope of annual FDI statistics. Annual FDI data are disseminated by Eurostat according to the directional principle (see sub section 3.4 below). The geographical allocation is made according to the economic residence of the immediate direct investor or immediate direct investment company (immediate counterparts). FDI data classified according to ultimate investor or host economy are not yet available at Eurostat (see 12.1).  International Guides recommend the classification of FDI data both according to the activity of the direct investor and the activity of the direct investment enterprise. In practice, it is very difficult for national compilers to have both classifications. In that case, the recommended classification by activity is that of the direct investment enterprise. On the outward side, national compilers are not always able to classify their FDI data according to the activity of the direct investment enterprise. In that case, the classification used as a proxy is the activity of the direct investor.  Alongside with International Trade in Services Statistics (ITSS) and Foreign Affiliates Trade Statistics (FATS), FDI data are relevant to monitor the overall effectiveness and competitiveness of different economies in the globalised world.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
       Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) encompasses all kind of cross-border investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). FDI is one of the five main functional categories of investment used in international accounts to classify either the Internal Investment Positions (IIP) or the Balance of Payment (BOP) statements of a given economy (vis-à-vis the rest of the world). Foreign Direct Investment positions show at a point in time (generally, end of a reference year) the value of financial direct investment assets of residents of an economy on non-residents, and financial direct investment liabilities of residents of an economy to non-resident. The net FDI position is the difference between assets and liabilities, which is also equivalent (under the directional principle presentation) to the difference between FDI positions abroad and in the reporting economy. The net FDI position represents either a net FDI claim or a net FDI liability to the rest of the world.        Foreign direct investment transactions summarize all economic direct investment interactions between the residents and the non-residents during a given period. Two types of FDI transactions can be identified (within the BOP framework) according to the economic meaning they convey: FDI income is a distributive transaction showing amounts payable and receivable between resident and non-resident entities in return for providing financial direct investment assets to the rest of the world, or incurring direct investment liabilities vis-à-vis the rest of the world.FDI flows refer to financial transactions showing the net acquisition or disposal of financial assets and liabilities involved in direct investment relationships.FDI positions, FDI income and FDI flows are disseminated by Eurostat together with estimated EU FDI aggregates (directly produced by Eurostat).  Other FDI changes that are not transaction changes, such as volume, value or prices changes, are not treated by Eurostat under the scope of annual FDI statistics. Annual FDI data are disseminated by Eurostat according to the directional principle (see sub section 3.4 below). The geographical allocation is made according to the economic residence of the immediate direct investor or immediate direct investment company (immediate counterparts). FDI data classified according to ultimate investor or host economy are not yet available at Eurostat (see 12.1).  International Guides recommend the classification of FDI data both according to the activity of the direct investor and the activity of the direct investment enterprise. In practice, it is very difficult for national compilers to have both classifications. In that case, the recommended classification by activity is that of the direct investment enterprise. On the outward side, national compilers are not always able to classify their FDI data according to the activity of the direct investment enterprise. In that case, the classification used as a proxy is the activity of the direct investor.  Alongside with International Trade in Services Statistics (ITSS) and Foreign Affiliates Trade Statistics (FATS), FDI data are relevant to monitor the overall effectiveness and competitiveness of different economies in the globalised world.
    • July 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment:Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery.Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time.Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three:Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows.Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely:Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares.Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows.Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators:FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • July 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment:Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery.Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time.Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three:Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows.Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely:Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares.Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows.Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators:FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • January 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 January, 2019
      Select Dataset
       Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) encompasses all kind of cross-border investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). FDI is one of the five main functional categories of investment used in international accounts to classify either the Internal Investment Positions (IIP) or the Balance of Payment (BOP) statements of a given economy (vis-à-vis the rest of the world). Foreign Direct Investment positions show at a point in time (generally, end of a reference year) the value of financial direct investment assets of residents of an economy on non-residents, and financial direct investment liabilities of residents of an economy to non-resident. The net FDI position is the difference between assets and liabilities, which is also equivalent (under the directional principle presentation) to the difference between FDI positions abroad and in the reporting economy. The net FDI position represents either a net FDI claim or a net FDI liability to the rest of the world.        Foreign direct investment transactions summarize all economic direct investment interactions between the residents and the non-residents during a given period. Two types of FDI transactions can be identified (within the BOP framework) according to the economic meaning they convey: FDI income is a distributive transaction showing amounts payable and receivable between resident and non-resident entities in return for providing financial direct investment assets to the rest of the world, or incurring direct investment liabilities vis-à-vis the rest of the world.FDI flows refer to financial transactions showing the net acquisition or disposal of financial assets and liabilities involved in direct investment relationships.FDI positions, FDI income and FDI flows are disseminated by Eurostat together with estimated EU FDI aggregates (directly produced by Eurostat).  Other FDI changes that are not transaction changes, such as volume, value or prices changes, are not treated by Eurostat under the scope of annual FDI statistics. Annual FDI data are disseminated by Eurostat according to the directional principle (see sub section 3.4 below). The geographical allocation is made according to the economic residence of the immediate direct investor or immediate direct investment company (immediate counterparts). FDI data classified according to ultimate investor or host economy are not yet available at Eurostat (see 12.1).  International Guides recommend the classification of FDI data both according to the activity of the direct investor and the activity of the direct investment enterprise. In practice, it is very difficult for national compilers to have both classifications. In that case, the recommended classification by activity is that of the direct investment enterprise. On the outward side, national compilers are not always able to classify their FDI data according to the activity of the direct investment enterprise. In that case, the classification used as a proxy is the activity of the direct investor.  Alongside with International Trade in Services Statistics (ITSS) and Foreign Affiliates Trade Statistics (FATS), FDI data are relevant to monitor the overall effectiveness and competitiveness of different economies in the globalised world.
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 March, 2018
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      20.1. Source data
    • July 2019
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 September, 2019
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      Dataset includes European Economic economic forecast releases from Winter 2018 through Summer 2019(Interim).
    • October 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 October, 2015
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      Recent exchange rate movements have been unusually large, triggering a debate regarding their likely effects on trade. Historical experience in advanced and emerging market and developing economies suggests that exchange rate movements typically have sizable effects on export and import volumes. A 10 percent real effective depreciation in an economy’s currency is associated with a rise in real net exports of, on average, 1.5 percent of GDP, with substantial cross-country variation around this average. Although these effects fully materialize over a number of years, much of the adjustment occurs in the first year. The boost to exports associated with currency depreciation is found to be largest in countries with initial economic slack and with domestic financial systems that are operating normally. Some evidence suggests that the rise of global value chains has weakened the relationship between exchange rates and trade in intermediate products used as inputs into other economies’ exports. However, the bulk of global trade still consists of conventional trade, and there is little evidence of a general trend toward disconnect between exchange rates and total exports and imports.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 November, 2019
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      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 October, 2019
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      The export market shares present the shares of each EU Member State in total world (or region) exports of goods and services. The indicator measures the degree of importance of a country within the total exports of the region/world. For the calculation at current prices, the market share refers to the world trade (world export market share). A country might lose shares of export market not only if exports decline but most importantly if its exports do not grow at the same rate of world exports and its relative position at the global level deteriorates. The MIP scoreboard indicator is Export market shares (goods and services) - 5 years % change. Additional indicators published in the domain are: Export market shares by items - 1 year % change and % of world totalShare of OECD exportsExports of high technology products as a share of total exports, SITC Rev. 4 - %
    • April 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 December, 2015
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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    • April 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2015
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  • F
    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 April, 2019
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    • January 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 February, 2019
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      Average of inward and outward Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) flows divided by gross domestic product (GDP). The index measures the intensity of investment integration within the international economy. The direct investment refers to the international investment made by a resident entity (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an entity operating in an economy other than that of the investor (direct investment enterprise). Direct investment involves both the initial transactions between the two entities and all subsequent capital transactions between them and among affiliated enterprises, both incorporated and unincorporated. Data are expressed as percentage of GDP to remove the effect of differences in the size of the economies of the reporting countries.
    • April 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 December, 2015
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
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      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information on the transition from ESA 95 to ESA 2010 is presented on the Eurostat website. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income) The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income)namq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes.
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 October, 2016
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    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 October, 2016
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    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 October, 2016
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    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 October, 2016
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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      The deflated house price index (or real house price index) is the ratio between the house price index (HPI) and the national accounts deflator for private final consumption expenditure (households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs)). This indicator therefore measures inflation in the house market relative to inflation in the final consumption expenditure of households and NPIs. Eurostat HPI captures price changes of all residential properties purchased by households (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.), both new and existing, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered, self-build dwellings are therefore excluded. The land component is included. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the year-on-year growth rate of the deflated house price index. In the MIP domain are also published annual and quarterly figures on:House price index, deflated – average index and rate of changeHouse price index – average rate of change, index and % change T/T-3
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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      Final consumption expenditure consists of expenditure incurred by resident institutional units on goods or services that are used for the direct satisfaction of individual needs or wants or the collective needs of members of the community (ESA 2010 3.94). Private final consumption expenditure includes households' and Non Profit Institutions Serving Households (NPISH's) final consumption expenditure. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 October, 2016
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
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      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
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      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a geographical region during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services, a component of BoP current account, and data on Foreign Direct Investment, a component of BoP financial account, are used to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Outward Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FATS) measure the commercial presence, as defined by the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), through affiliates in foreign markets. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports.  Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU or in millions of national currency. Balance of Payments data coverage varies according to the collection. Some collections refer only to Euro area or EU countries, while some others' coverage includes also EU partner countries.   Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide 2003. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.    More information on BoP is available for each specific collection: Quarterly BoP, ITS, FDI, Outward FATS, BoP of EU Institutions.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
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      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The BoP provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current, capital and financial accounts. The Current account provides information about the transactions of a country with the rest of the world. It covers all transactions (other than those in financial items) in goods, services, primary income and secondary income, which occur between resident and non-resident units. The MIP scoreboard indicator is 3 years average of Current account balance as % of GDP. In addition annual and quarterly data on the BoP sub-balances and its components are published under the MIP domain.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 November, 2019
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      Financial flows and stocks data are often referred to collectively in the national accounts framework as 'financial accounts'. Financial flows consist of transactions and other flows, and represent the difference between the opening financial balance sheet at the start of the year and the closing balance sheet at the end of the year. The data are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts (ESA 2010), which came into force in September 2014, and are presented here in the following tables: 'Financial transactions', 'Other changes in volume', 'Revaluation account', and 'Financial balance sheets'. 
    • July 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 July, 2012
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      Note:i) All the Data Present in this dataset are "Not seasonally adjusted data (NSA)". ii)Eurostat Hierarchy: General and regional statistics > European and national short term indicators (euroind) > Monetary and financial indicators (ei_mf).
    • August 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Quarterly Sector Accounts (QSA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 1995 (Council Regulation 2223/96). The transmission of the QSA data by the Member States follows the Regulation (EC) N° 1161/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council (QSA regulation). The QSA encompass the non-financial accounts and provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The compilation of QSA is the outcome of a close collaboration by Eurostat and the ECB, in cooperation with the national statistical institutes and national central banks. The ECB and Eurostat are publishing integrated non-financial and financial accounts, including financial balance sheets, for the euro area (the euro area accounts). Eurostat is also publishing the non-financial accounts for the EU. The QSA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and show relations between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 1995 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1, in turn, the following institutional sectors are distinguished: - Non-financial Corporations (S.11) - Financial Corporations (S.12) - General Government (S.13) - Households and Non-profit Institutions Serving Households (S.14 + S.15). The full set of quarterly sector accounts is published for euro area / EU28 aggregates only. However, a subset of quarterly national key indicators is available at dedicated section (see "Quarterly data") as well as in the database (see table "Key indicators") for most of the 17 members of the European Economic Area (EEA) whose GDP is above 1% of the EU28 total. The other EEA members do not have to transmit the quarterly accounts of corporations and households to Eurostat. Non-financial accounts are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasq_nf_tr). The other three tables (only the Euro area) include financial accounts, other flows and balance sheets. QSA data are provided at current prices only. The key indicators (and their components) of households and non-financial corporations as published in the QSA news release are seasonally adjusted. Data are presented in millions of national currency, euro and as percentages.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The international investment position (IIP) is a statistical statement that provides an aggregate view of the net financial position (assets minus liabilities) of a country vis-à-vis the rest of the world. It allows for a stock-flow analysis of external position of a country. It shows at a point in time the value and composition of: financial assets of residents of an economy that are claims on non-residents and gold bullion held as reserve assets, andliabilities of residents of an economy to non-residents. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the net international investment position expressed as % of GDP. Additionally are published data for the different functional categories (Direct investment; Portfolio investment; Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options (ESOs) and Other investment) in % of GDP and national currency.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The international investment position (IIP) is a statistical statement that provides an aggregate view of the net financial position (assets minus liabilities) of a country vis-à-vis the rest of the world. It allows for a stock-flow analysis of external position of a country. It shows at a point in time the value and composition of: financial assets of residents of an economy that are claims on non-residents and gold bullion held as reserve assets, andliabilities of residents of an economy to non-residents. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the net international investment position expressed as % of GDP. Additionally are published data for the different functional categories (Direct investment; Portfolio investment; Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options (ESOs) and Other investment) in % of GDP and national currency.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The international investment position (IIP) is a statistical statement that provides an aggregate view of the net financial position (assets minus liabilities) of a country vis-à-vis the rest of the world. It allows for a stock-flow analysis of external position of a country. It shows at a point in time the value and composition of: financial assets of residents of an economy that are claims on non-residents and gold bullion held as reserve assets, andliabilities of residents of an economy to non-residents. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the net international investment position expressed as % of GDP. Additionally are published data for the different functional categories (Direct investment; Portfolio investment; Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options (ESOs) and Other investment) in % of GDP and national currency.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Financial flows and stocks data are often referred to collectively in the national accounts framework as 'financial accounts'. Financial flows consist of transactions and other flows, and represent the difference between the opening financial balance sheet at the start of the year and the closing balance sheet at the end of the year. The data are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts (ESA 2010), which came into force in September 2014. The Total financial sector liabilities measure the evolution of the sum of all liabilities (which includes Currency and deposits, Debt securities, Loans, Equity and investment fund shares/units, Insurance, pensions and standardised guarantee schemes, Financial derivatives and employee stock options and Other accounts payable) of the financial corporations sector (S.12). The MIP scoreboard indicator is the non-consolidated Total financial sector liabilities, 1 year percentage change. For the MIP purposes are published annual consolidated and non-consolidated data by institutional sectors and financial instruments.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The financial flows and stocks data are reported quarterly to the European Central Bank. Once validated the data are transmitted to Eurostat.  Financial flows consist of transactions and other flows and represent  the difference between opening balance sheet  at the beginning of the year and closing balance sheet at the end of the year
    • August 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Quarterly Sector Accounts (QSA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 1995 (Council Regulation 2223/96). The transmission of the QSA data by the Member States follows the Regulation (EC) N° 1161/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council (QSA regulation). The QSA encompass the non-financial accounts and provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The compilation of QSA is the outcome of a close collaboration by Eurostat and the ECB, in cooperation with the national statistical institutes and national central banks. The ECB and Eurostat are publishing integrated non-financial and financial accounts, including financial balance sheets, for the euro area (the euro area accounts). Eurostat is also publishing the non-financial accounts for the EU. The QSA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and show relations between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 1995 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1, in turn, the following institutional sectors are distinguished: - Non-financial Corporations (S.11) - Financial Corporations (S.12) - General Government (S.13) - Households and Non-profit Institutions Serving Households (S.14 + S.15). The full set of quarterly sector accounts is published for euro area / EU28 aggregates only. However, a subset of quarterly national key indicators is available at dedicated section (see "Quarterly data") as well as in the database (see table "Key indicators") for most of the 17 members of the European Economic Area (EEA) whose GDP is above 1% of the EU28 total. The other EEA members do not have to transmit the quarterly accounts of corporations and households to Eurostat. Non-financial accounts are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasq_nf_tr). The other three tables (only the Euro area) include financial accounts, other flows and balance sheets. QSA data are provided at current prices only. The key indicators (and their components) of households and non-financial corporations as published in the QSA news release are seasonally adjusted. Data are presented in millions of national currency, euro and as percentages.
    • August 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Financial transactions in assets and liabilities, consolidated and non-consolidated, for all the sectors of the economy and in relation to rest of the world. (Tables 610 and 620 of ESA 95 transmission programme)
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • G
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 October, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 October, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information on the transition from ESA 95 to ESA 2010 is presented on the Eurostat website. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income) The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income)namq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes.
    • June 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 June, 2012
      Select Dataset
      GDP and main components dataset contains both Quarterly & Annual data for ; Current prices, volumes and Price indices
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Implicit deflators are calculated by dividing an aggregate measured in current prices by the same aggregate measured in constant prices. Implicit deflators are named after the aggregate used (Gross Domestic Product in this case). The deflator is calculated from seasonally adjusted GDP values and rescaled so that 2010 = 100. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data from 1st of June 2018. For most recent GDP data, consult dataset nama_10_gdp. Gross domestic product (GDP) is a measure for the economic activity. It is defined as the value of all goods and services produced less the value of any goods or services used in their creation. The volume index of GDP per capita in Purchasing Power Standards (PPS) is expressed in relation to the European Union (EU28) average set to equal 100. If the index of a country is higher than 100, this country's level of GDP per head is higher than the EU average and vice versa. Basic figures are expressed in PPS, i.e. a common currency that eliminates the differences in price levels between countries allowing meaningful volume comparisons of GDP between countries. Please note that the index, calculated from PPS figures and expressed with respect to EU28 = 100, is intended for cross-country comparisons rather than for temporal comparisons."
    • July 2019
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Sandeep Reddy
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      GDP: Expenditure Approach, in National Currency, by Country and Expenditure
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Government Finance Statistics (GFS) form the basis for fiscal monitoring in Europe, most notably for the statistics related to the Excessive Deficit Procedure (EDP). The EDP is established in the Treaty and specified in the Stability and Growth Pact legislation. The Member States report data related to the EDP to the Commission (Eurostat) which, in turn, is responsible for providing the data to the Council. European GFS, including the statistics for the EDP, are produced in accordance with the European System of Accounts 2010 (ESA 2010), the EU manual for national accounts, which in September 2014 replaced the previous version of the national accounting framework ESA 95. It is supplemented by further interpretation and guidance from Eurostat, in particular the Manual on Government Deficit and Debt. Council Regulation 479/2009 as amended requires that Member States report government deficit/surplus (hereinafter deficit) and debt data related to the EDP twice per year: before 1 April and 1 October for the preceding four calendar years and a forecast for the current year. The data are reported in harmonised tables. These tables are designed specifically to provide a consistent framework, with a link to national budgetary aggregates and between the deficit and changes in the debt. They should be fully consistent with GFS data delivered to Eurostat in the ESA 2010 transmission programme. The EDP notification tables contain for general government and its sub sectors:Table 1: Summary table on deficit and debt, including auxiliary indicators (Gross Fixed Capital Formation, Interest and Gross Domestic Product - GDP)Tables 2A - 2D: Transition from the working balance to the deficit/surplus for general government sub sectorsTables 3A - 3E: Transition from the deficit/surplus to the change in debt for general government and its sub sectorsTable 4: Supplementary data. The data are presented in the Eurostat's Statistics Database in national currency, euro/ECU, and percentage of GDP. In order to reflect economic and technological developments and meet user needs, in September 2014 the new national accounting framework ESA 2010 replaced the previous framework ESA 95. This led to revisions of the time series for all Member States (please see Eurostat press release for the impact of the revisions on the government deficit and debt ratios). The main changes relate to the classification of certain entities into government and the treatment of transactions related to pension schemes. Also the concept of government deficit was changed as regards treatment of interest on swaps and forward rate agreements (Commission Regulation 220/2014 amending the Council Regulation 479/2009), according to which these flows are now recorded as financial transaction in line with the core ESA accounting framework.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The data correspond to quarterly non-financial accounts for the general government sector which are conceptually consistent with the corresponding annual data compiled on a national accounts (ESA2010) basis. The data sets contain quarterly general government total expenditure and total revenue figures, as well as their breakdowns by relevant categories and the resulting quarterly government deficit/surplus.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Main revenue and expenditure items of the general government sector, notified by national authorities in Table 2 of the ESA2010 transmission programme. Data are presented in millions of Euro, millions of national currency units and percentages of GDP. Geographic coverage: EU and euro area, Iceland, Norway and Switzerland. Main sources of data: National authorities (National Statistical Institutes)
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Government Finance Statistics (GFS) form the basis for fiscal monitoring in Europe, most notably for the statistics related to the Excessive Deficit Procedure (EDP). The EDP is established in the Treaty and specified in the Stability and Growth Pact legislation. The Member States report data related to the EDP to the Commission (Eurostat) which, in turn, is responsible for providing the data to the Council. European GFS, including the statistics for the EDP, are produced in accordance with the European System of Accounts 2010 (ESA 2010), the EU manual for national accounts, which in September 2014 replaced the previous version of the national accounting framework ESA 95. It is supplemented by further interpretation and guidance from Eurostat, in particular the Manual on Government Deficit and Debt. Council Regulation 479/2009 as amended requires that Member States report government deficit/surplus (hereinafter deficit) and debt data related to the EDP twice per year: before 1 April and 1 October for the preceding four calendar years and a forecast for the current year. The data are reported in harmonised tables. These tables are designed specifically to provide a consistent framework, with a link to national budgetary aggregates and between the deficit and changes in the debt. They should be fully consistent with GFS data delivered to Eurostat in the ESA 2010 transmission programme. The EDP notification tables contain for general government and its sub sectors:Table 1: Summary table on deficit and debt, including auxiliary indicators (Gross Fixed Capital Formation, Interest and Gross Domestic Product - GDP)Tables 2A - 2D: Transition from the working balance to the deficit/surplus for general government sub sectorsTables 3A - 3E: Transition from the deficit/surplus to the change in debt for general government and its sub sectorsTable 4: Supplementary data. The data are presented in the Eurostat's Statistics Database in national currency, euro/ECU, and percentage of GDP. In order to reflect economic and technological developments and meet user needs, in September 2014 the new national accounting framework ESA 2010 replaced the previous framework ESA 95. This led to revisions of the time series for all Member States (please see Eurostat press release for the impact of the revisions on the government deficit and debt ratios). The main changes relate to the classification of certain entities into government and the treatment of transactions related to pension schemes. Also the concept of government deficit was changed as regards treatment of interest on swaps and forward rate agreements (Commission Regulation 220/2014 amending the Council Regulation 479/2009), according to which these flows are now recorded as financial transaction in line with the core ESA accounting framework.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Government Finance Statistics (GFS) form the basis for fiscal monitoring in the European Union, most notably for the statistics related to the Excessive Deficit Procedure (EDP). The EDP is established in the Treaty and specified in the Stability and Growth Pact legislation. The Member States report data related to the EDP to the Commission (Eurostat) which, in turn, is responsible for providing the data to the Council. The concepts for EDP statistics are explained in Council Regulation (EC) N° 479/2009, as amended and Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council and subsequent legal amendments, supplemented by further interpretation and guidance from Eurostat in the  Manual on Government Deficit and Debt. The EDP statistics are produced in accordance with the European System of Accounts 2010 (ESA 2010). The Government debt is defined as the total gross debt at nominal value outstanding at the end of the year and consolidated between and within the sectors of general government. This definition is supplemented by Council Regulation (EC) No 479/2009, as amended by the Commission Regulation (EU) No 220/2014, specifying the components of government debt with reference to the definitions of financial liabilities and instruments according to the European System of National and Regional Accounts (ESA 2010). The Council Regulation 479/2009 as amended requires that Member States report government deficit/surplus (hereinafter deficit) and debt data related to the EDP twice per year (before 1 April and 1 October) for the preceding four calendar years and a forecast for the current year. The data are reported in harmonised tables. The harmonised tables are designed specifically to provide a consistent framework, with a link to national budgetary aggregates and between the deficit and changes in the debt. They should be fully consistent with GFS data delivered to Eurostat in the ESA 2010 transmission programme. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the annual consolidated General government gross debt.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Government Finance Statistics (GFS) form the basis for fiscal monitoring in Europe, most notably for the statistics related to the Excessive Deficit Procedure (EDP). The EDP is established in the Treaty and specified in the Stability and Growth Pact legislation. The Member States report data related to the EDP to the Commission (Eurostat) which, in turn, is responsible for providing the data to the Council. European GFS, including the statistics for the EDP, are produced in accordance with the European System of Accounts 2010 (ESA 2010), the EU manual for national accounts, which in September 2014 replaced the previous version of the national accounting framework ESA 95. It is supplemented by further interpretation and guidance from Eurostat, in particular the Manual on Government Deficit and Debt. Council Regulation 479/2009 as amended requires that Member States report government deficit/surplus (hereinafter deficit) and debt data related to the EDP twice per year: before 1 April and 1 October for the preceding four calendar years and a forecast for the current year. The data are reported in harmonised tables. These tables are designed specifically to provide a consistent framework, with a link to national budgetary aggregates and between the deficit and changes in the debt. They should be fully consistent with GFS data delivered to Eurostat in the ESA 2010 transmission programme. The EDP notification tables contain for general government and its sub sectors: Table 1: Summary table on deficit and debt, including auxiliary indicators (Gross Fixed Capital Formation, Interest and Gross Domestic Product - GDP)Tables 2A - 2D: Transition from the working balance to the deficit/surplus for general government sub sectorsTables 3A - 3E: Transition from the deficit/surplus to the change in debt for general government and its sub sectorsTable 4: Supplementary data. The data are presented in the Eurostat's Statistics Database in national currency, euro/ECU, and percentage of GDP. In order to reflect economic and technological developments and meet user needs, in September 2014 the new national accounting framework ESA 2010 replaced the previous framework ESA 95. This led to revisions of the time series for all Member States (please see Eurostat press release for the impact of the revisions on the government deficit and debt ratios). The main changes relate to the classification of certain entities into government and the treatment of transactions related to pension schemes. Also the concept of government deficit was changed as regards treatment of interest on swaps and forward rate agreements (Commission Regulation 220/2014 amending the Council Regulation 479/2009), according to which these flows are now recorded as financial transaction in line with the core ESA accounting framework.
    • August 2019
      Source: United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • October 2019
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 October, 2019
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      Vulnerabilities in a Maturing Credit Cycle The October 2019 Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) finds that despite significant variability over the past two quarters, financial conditions remain accommodative. As a result, financial vulnerabilities have continued to build in the sovereign, corporate, and non bank financial sectors in several systemically important countries, leading to elevated medium-term risks. The report attempts to provide a comprehensive assessment of these vulnerabilities while focusing specifically on corporate sector debt in advanced economies, the sovereign–financial sector nexus in the euro area, China’s financial imbalances, volatile portfolio flows to emerging markets, and downside risks to the housing market. These vulnerabilities require action by policymakers, including through the clear communication of any changes in their monetary policy outlook, the deployment and expansion of macroprudential tools, the stepping up of measures to repair public and private sector balance sheets, and the strengthening of emerging market resilience to foreign portfolio out flows. Downside Risks to House Prices The study and quantifies house prices at risk, a measure of downside risks to future house price growth—using theory, insights from past analyses, and new statistical techniques applied to 32 advanced and emerging market economies and major cities. The chapter finds that lower house price momentum, overvaluation, excessive credit growth, and tighter financial conditions predict heightened downside risks to house prices up to three years ahead. The measure of house prices at risk helps forecast downside risks to GDP growth and adds to early-warning models for financial crises. Policymakers can use estimates of house prices at risk to complement other surveillance indicators of housing market vulnerabilities and guide macroprudential policy actions aimed at building buffers and reducing vulnerabilities. Downside risks to house prices could also be relevant for monetary policymakers when forming their views on the downside risks to the economic and inflation outlook. Authorities considering measures to manage capital flows might also find such information useful when a surge in capital inflows increases downside risks to house prices and when other policy options are limited.
    • September 2018
      Source: Dual Citizen LLC
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2018
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      The performance index of the 2018 GGEI is defined by 20 underlying indicators, each contained within one of the four main dimensions of leadership & climate change, efficiency sectors, markets & investment and the environment.   For more detail on our approach to aggregating these diverse data sources to define the composite indicators in the GGEI and its four main dimensions, as well as our approach to data selection, weighting and other issues associated with creating an index, please visit the Methodology section.
    • December 2018
      Source: Knowledge4All
      Uploaded by: Sandeep Reddy
      Accessed On: 18 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: Knowledge4All,United Nations Development Programme & Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation.   Note-Full Version can be checked here: https://knoema.com/WLDKALLGKI2018Dec/global-knowledge-index The GKI is a partnership initiative between the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation (MBRF), it was first announced during the Knowledge Summit in 2016. The Global Knowledge Index (GKI) is the index that measures knowledge on the global level, it highlights the strategic role of knowledge and the importance of developing objective and scientific tools to measure and evaluate it. The GKI aims at measuring knowledge as a broad concept that is intricately related to all aspects of modern human life, in a systematic approach that builds on solid conceptual and methodological principles. The Global Knowledge Index (GKI) is the only index that measures knowledge on the global level, it highlights the strategic role of knowledge and the importance of developing objective and scientific tools to measure and evaluate it. The GKI aims at measuring knowledge as a broad concept that is intricately related to all aspects of modern human life, in a systematic approach that builds on solid conceptual and methodological principles. The GKI is composed of six sectoral indices: 1) Pre - university education 2) Technical vocational education and training(TVET) 3) Higher education 4) Research, development and innovation(RDI) 5) Information and communications technology (ICT) 6) Economy in addition to a seventh supporting index on the General Enabling Environment. All values are normalized to a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).
    • December 2018
      Source: Knowledge4All
      Uploaded by: Sandeep Reddy
      Accessed On: 18 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: Knowledge4All,United Nations Development Programme & Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation. The GKI is a partnership initiative between the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation (MBRF), it was first announced during the Knowledge Summit in 2016. The Global Knowledge Index (GKI) is the index that measures knowledge on the global level, it highlights the strategic role of knowledge and the importance of developing objective and scientific tools to measure and evaluate it. The GKI aims at measuring knowledge as a broad concept that is intricately related to all aspects of modern human life, in a systematic approach that builds on solid conceptual and methodological principles. The Global Knowledge Index (GKI) is the only index that measures knowledge on the global level, it highlights the strategic role of knowledge and the importance of developing objective and scientific tools to measure and evaluate it. The GKI aims at measuring knowledge as a broad concept that is intricately related to all aspects of modern human life, in a systematic approach that builds on solid conceptual and methodological principles. The GKI is composed of six sectoral indices: 1) Pre - university education 2) Technical vocational education and training(TVET) 3) Higher education 4) Research, development and innovation(RDI) 5) Information and communications technology (ICT) 6) Economy in addition to a seventh supporting index on the General Enabling Environment. All values are normalized to a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).   The Pre-University Education sector plays a central role in building the knowledge capital that represents the first input in preparing young people to acquire and produce knowledge. Pre-university education equips youth with scientific knowledge, as well as creative skills and capacities, to access lifelong learning opportunities. This sector is therefore key, as it constitutes the first basis for other sectors to build upon. It is composed of two pillars: knowledge capital and educational enabling environment. The Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) sector represents the main connection between education and the labour market and provides educated young people with opportunities for professional integration. It contributes to the provision of high-skilled labour and the development of conducive working environments. It is composed of two pillars: formation and professional training and features of the labour market. The Higher Education sector is of high importance, as it is an active component in educating youth, developing their qualifications, and expanding their knowledge and skills, which results in the improvement of a country’s productivity and competitiveness in global markets. It is also considered among the most important factors that directly contribute to the advancement of scientific research and technological development. It is composed of two pillars: higher education inputs and higher education outputs and quality. Research, Development, and Innovation (RDI) contribute to increasing knowledge at the national and regional levels. RDI, which serves as a driver for economic growth and sustainable development in both developed and developing countries, is mainly based on the production of new or improved goods, services, production processes, and organizational models. RDI is closely linked to other sectors as it provides essential inputs to the entire system. It is composed of three pillars: research and development, innovation in production, and social innovation. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) plays an essential role in supporting the advancement of knowledge across all sectors. Advancements in knowledge-intensive production have become closely linked to the provision of advanced technology, especially as the Internet has increased the opportunities available to acquire knowledge. Therefore, it is essential for countries to employ indicators that quantify their levels of ICT development for the benefit of stakeholders in their societies. It is composed of two pillars: ICT inputs and ICT outputs. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) plays an essential role in supporting the advancement of knowledge across all sectors. Advancements in knowledge-intensive production have become closely linked to the provision of advanced technology, especially as the Internet has increased the opportunities available to acquire knowledge. Therefore, it is essential for countries to employ indicators that quantify their levels of ICT development for the benefit of stakeholders in their societies. It is composed of two pillars: ICT inputs and ICT outputs. The Knowledge Economy is the main driver of sustainable development, wealth creation, and job creation in various economic fields, across the industrial, agricultural, and service sectors. Unlike the traditional concept of economic resource analysis and availability, a knowledge economy is primarily based on providing economic resources, particularly human resources, with knowledge tools, including digital and technological knowledge assets, as well as innovative and creative skills. It is composed of three pillars: knowledge competitiveness, economic openness, and financing and value added. The General Enabling Environment was added to support the 6 sectoral indices, as these sectors do not operate in isolation from their surroundings, but rather in a space governed by a range of contextual factors – political, socioeconomic, health-related, and environmental. It is composed of three pillars: political and institutional, socio-economic, and health and environment.
    • May 2019
      Source: KPMG
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 June, 2019
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      Covers data on corporate, indirect and individual income tax rates throughout 163 countries across the world during the period from 2006 to 2019. Provided by KPMG.
    • February 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 February, 2017
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      In this version, seven GVCs indicators are presented for 59 economies (34 OECD and 23 non-OECD economies, plus the "rest of the world" and the European Union) for 18 industries in the years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2008-2011. The indicators are calculated based on the five global input-output matrices of the TiVA database. More details can be downloaded at https://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx?queryid=66237#. The GVC participation index indicates the extent to which a country is involved in a vertically fragmented production process (in relative and absolute terms). It distinguishes the use of foreign inputs in exports (backward participation) and the use of domestic intermediates in third country exports (forward participation).
    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 April, 2019
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      Going for Growth helps to promote sustainable economic growth and improve the well-being of OECD citizens. The surveillance is based on a systematic and in-depth analysis of structural policies and their outcomes across OECD members, relying on a set of internationally comparable and regularly updated policy indicators with a well-established link to performance. From one issue to the next, Going for Growth follows up on these recommendations and priorities evolve, not least as a result of governments taking action, http://www.oecd.org/eco/going-for-growth/. This dataset contains time series of a comprehensive set of quantitative indicators that allow for a comparison of policy settings across OECD countries and selected non-member economies: Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Lithuania, the Russian Federation and South Africa. The dataset covers several areas: Product market regulation (economy-wide and sector-specific regulation), Education, Public investment and subsidies, Taxation, Labour market, Transfers. Data are consistent with those published in the Structural Policy Indicators chapter of Going for Growth 2018. The cut-off date is December 2017.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
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      Government Finance Statistics (GFS) form the basis for fiscal monitoring in Europe, most notably for the statistics related to the Excessive Deficit Procedure (EDP). The EDP is established in the Treaty and specified in the Stability and Growth Pact legislation. The Member States report data related to the EDP to the Commission (Eurostat) which, in turn, is responsible for providing the data to the Council. European GFS, including the statistics for the EDP, are produced in accordance with the European System of Accounts 2010 (ESA 2010), the EU manual for national accounts, which in September 2014 replaced the previous version of the national accounting framework ESA 95. It is supplemented by further interpretation and guidance from Eurostat, in particular the Manual on Government Deficit and Debt. Council Regulation 479/2009 as amended requires that Member States report government deficit/surplus (hereinafter deficit) and debt data related to the EDP twice per year: before 1 April and 1 October for the preceding four calendar years and a forecast for the current year. The data are reported in harmonised tables. These tables are designed specifically to provide a consistent framework, with a link to national budgetary aggregates and between the deficit and changes in the debt. They should be fully consistent with GFS data delivered to Eurostat in the ESA 2010 transmission programme. The EDP notification tables contain for general government and its sub sectors: Table 1: Summary table on deficit and debt, including auxiliary indicators (Gross Fixed Capital Formation, Interest and Gross Domestic Product - GDP)Tables 2A - 2D: Transition from the working balance to the deficit/surplus for general government sub sectorsTables 3A - 3E: Transition from the deficit/surplus to the change in debt for general government and its sub sectorsTable 4: Supplementary data. The data are presented in the Eurostat's Statistics Database in national currency, euro/ECU, and percentage of GDP. In order to reflect economic and technological developments and meet user needs, in September 2014 the new national accounting framework ESA 2010 replaced the previous framework ESA 95. This led to revisions of the time series for all Member States (please see Eurostat press release for the impact of the revisions on the government deficit and debt ratios). The main changes relate to the classification of certain entities into government and the treatment of transactions related to pension schemes. Also the concept of government deficit was changed as regards treatment of interest on swaps and forward rate agreements (Commission Regulation 220/2014 amending the Council Regulation 479/2009), according to which these flows are now recorded as financial transaction in line with the core ESA accounting framework.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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      Government final consumption expenditure (ESA 2010, 3.98) includes two categories of expenditures: the value of goods and services produced by general government itself other than own-account capital formation, and purchases by general government of goods and services produced by market producers that are supplied to households - without any transformation - as social transfers in kind. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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      National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts, annual and quarterly sector accounts as well as supply, use and input-output tables, which are each presented with associated metadata. Even though consistency checks are a major aspect of data validation, temporary (usually limited) inconsistencies between datasets may occur, mainly due to vintage effects. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013.   The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information (including actual communications) is presented on the Eurostat website. The domain consists of the following collections:   1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by durability and exports and imports by origin.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 November, 2019
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      The non-financial Annual Sector Accounts (ASA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts (ESA 2010) and are transmitted by the EU Member States, EEA Members (Norway, Iceland) and Switzerland following ESA2010 transmission programme(Table 8) established by the Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union, annexes A and B respectively). The ASA encompass non-financial accounts that provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The ASA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and interactions between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 2010 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1 and S.2, in turn, more detailed subsectors are distinguished as explained in more detail in section "3.2 Classification system". Data are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasa_10_nf_tr). The table contains data, as far as they are available, expressed in national currency and millions of euro in current prices. In line with ESA2010 Transmission programme requirements data series start from 1995 (unless subject to voluntary transmission option and/or country specific derogations). Countries may transmit longer series on voluntary basis. Available level of detail by sectors and transactions may also vary by country due to voluntary transmission of some items (as defined in ESA2010 transmission programme) and country specific derogations. ASA collected according ESA2010 Transmission programme include selected data on employment (in persons and hours worked) by institutional sectors. However, as transmission of these variables is voluntary (except for the sector of General government), data availability may vary significantly across countries. A set of key indicators, deemed meaningful for economic analysis, is available in the table "Key indicators" (nasa_10_ki) for most of the members of the European Economic Area (EEA), of the Euro area and EU. Key ratios are derived from non-financial transactions as follows:Gross household saving rate (S.14_S.15): B8G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of households (S.14_S.15): P51G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of non-financial corporations (S.11): P51G/B1G*100Gross profit share of non-financial corporations (S.11): B2G_B3G/B1G*100Total investment to GDP ratio (S.1): P51G/B1GQ*100Business investment to GDP ratio (S.11+S.12): P51G/B1GQ*100Government investment to GDP ratio (S.13): P51G/B1GQ*100Households investment to GDP ratio (S.14_S.15): P51G/B1GQ*100 With the following transaction codes:B8G -  Gross savingB6G - Gross disposable incomeD8rec / D8pay - the adjustment for the change in pension entitlements (receivable / payable)P51G - Gross fixed capital formationB1G - Gross value addedB1GQ – Gross domestic productB2G_B3G - Gross operating surplus/ mixed income. In the above, all ratios are expressed in gross terms, i.e. before deduction of consumption of fixed capital. The following key indicators combine non-financial with financial accounts:Gross return on capital employed, before taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [B2G_B3G/(AF2+AF3+AF4+AF5, liab)]*100Net debt-to-income ratio, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): ([(AF2+AF3+AF4, liab)/(B4N-D5pay)]*100)Net return on equity, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [(B4N-D5pay)/(AF5, liab)]*100Gross debt-to-income ratio of households (S.14_15): [(AF4, liab)/(B6G+D8net)]*100Household net financial assets ratio (BF90/(B6G+D8net)) With the following codes (the codes already described above have not been listed):B4N - Net entrepreneurial incomeD5pay - Current taxes on income and wealthAF2 - Currency and depositsAF3 - Debt securities (excluding financial derivatives)AF4 - LoansAF5 - Equity and investment fund sharesBF90 – Financial net worth "rec" means resources, that is transactions that add to the economic value of a given sector. "pay" means "uses", that is transactions that reduce the economic value of a given sector. "liab" refers to the stock of liabilities incurred by a given sector and recorded in the financial balance sheets. See also the sector accounts dedicated website for more information.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
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      Gross national disposable income (ESA 2010, 8.95) is the sum of the gross disposable incomes of the institutional sectors. It is equal to: Gross national income (at market prices) + current transfers receivable by resident units from the rest of the world - current transfers payable to non-resident units from the rest of the world. Values are seasonally and calendar adjusted (SCA). The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
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    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 August, 2017
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      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • March 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 April, 2014
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:nama_r_e2gdp Gross domestic product - GDP at market prices - is the final result of the production activity of resident producer units (ESA 1995, 8.89). It can be defined in three ways: 1. Output approach GDP is the sum of gross value added of the various institutional sectors or the various industries plus taxes and less subsidies on products (which are not allocated to sectors and industries). It is also the balancing item in the total economy production account. 2. Expenditure approach GDP is the sum of final uses of goods and services by resident institutional units (final consumption expenditure and gross capital formation), plus exports and minus imports of goods and services. At regional level the expediture approach is not used in the EU, because there is no data on regional exports and imports.  3. Income approach GDP is the sum of uses in the total economy generation of income account: compensation of employees, taxes on production, less subsidies, gross operating surplus and mixed income of the total economy. The different measures for the regional GDP are absolute figures in € and Purchasing Power Standards (PPS), figures per inhabitant and relative data compared to the EU27 average.
    • February 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 April, 2014
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:nama_r_e3gdp National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts, annual and quarterly sector accounts as well as supply, use and input-output tables, which are each presented with associated metadata. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 1995 (Council Regulation 2223/96). Annex B of the Regulation consists of a comprehensive list of the variables to be transmitted for Community purposes within specified time limits. This transmission programme has been updated by Regulation (EC) N° 1392/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council. Meanwhile, the ESA95 has been reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information on the transition from ESA 95 to ESA 2010 is presented on the Eurostat website. The domain consists of the following collections: GDP and main aggregates. The data are recorded at current and constant prices and include the corresponding implicit price indices. Final consumption aggregates, including the split into household and government consumption. The data are recorded at current and constant prices and include the corresponding implicit price indices. Income, saving and net lending / net borrowing at current prices. Disposable income is also shown in real terms. Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries. The data are recorded at current and constant prices and include the corresponding implicit price indices. Breakdowns of gross value added, compensation of employees, wages and salaries, operating surplus, employment (domestic scope), gross fixed capital formation (GFCF) and fixed assets and other main aggregates by industry; investment by products and household final consumption expenditure by consumption purposes (COICOP). The data are recorded at current and constant prices and include the corresponding implicit price indices. Auxiliary indicators: Population and employment national data, purchasing power parities, contributions to GDP growth, labour productivity, unit labour cost and GDP per capita. Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. The data are published: - in ECU/euro, in national currencies (including euro converted from former national currencies using the irrevocably fixed rate for all years) and in Purchasing Power Standards (PPS); - at current prices and in volume terms; - Population and employment are measured in persons. Employment is also measured in total hours worked. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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      Gross domestic product (GDP) at market prices is the final result of the production activity of resident producer units. It is defined as the value of all goods and services produced less the value of any goods or services used in their creation. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are presented in million units of national currency.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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      Gross domestic product (GDP) at market prices is the final result of the production activity of resident producer units. It is defined as the value of all goods and services produced less the value of any goods or services used in their creation. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are seasonally adjusted and presented in million units of national currency.
    • October 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • October 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:urt_e3gdp
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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      Gross domestic product (GDP) at market prices is the final result of the production activity of resident producer units (ESA 2010, 8.89). It can be defined in three ways: a production approach, an income approach and an expenditure approach. Values are seasonally adjusted (SA). The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
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      Gross fixed capital formation (GFCF) consists of resident producers' acquisitions, less disposals, of fixed assets during a given period plus certain additions to the value of non-produced assets realised by the productive activity of producer or institutional units. GFCF includes acquisition less disposals of, e.g. buildings, structures, machinery and equipment, mineral exploration, computer software, literary or artistic originals and major improvements to land such as the clearance of forests. The input data are obtained through official transmissions of national accounts' country data in the ESA2010 transmission programme. Data are expressed as % of GDP, in million euro and in million units of national currency.
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 October, 2016
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    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts, annual and quarterly sector accounts as well as supply, use and input-output tables, which are each presented with associated metadata. Even though consistency checks are a major aspect of data validation, temporary (usually limited) inconsistencies between datasets may occur, mainly due to vintage effects. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013.   The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information (including actual communications) is presented on the Eurostat website. The domain consists of the following collections:   1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by durability and exports and imports by origin.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • June 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 April, 2014
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:nama_r_e2gfcfr2 Branch accounts include data on gross value added, compensation of employees, gross fixed capital formation, total employment and number of employees. The legal base for the collection of branch accounts data is the European System of Accounts ESA95. The ESA95 data are sent to Eurostat by the National Statistical Institutes. The units for these variables are: Millions of national currency and millions of Euro for gross value added, compensation of employees and gross fixed capital formation. 1000 persons for total employment and number of employees at NUTS level 3 1000 hours worked for total employment and number of employees at NUTS level 2 Geographical coverage comprises all EU Member States and some Candidate countries down to Nuts 3 level (Nuts = "Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics" - see Eurostat's classification server "RAMON") for the variables gross value added, total employment and number of employees. Compensation of employees, employment in hours worked and gross fixed capital formation are only collected down to Nuts 2 level. For further information about sources and collection methods in the Member States, please refer to National Statistical Institutes (select Services - Links).
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information on the transition from ESA 95 to ESA 2010 is presented on the Eurostat website. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income) The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income)namq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross fixed capital formation (GFCF, ESA 2010, 3.124) consists of resident producers' acquisitions, less disposals, of fixed assets during a given period plus certain additions to the value of non-produced assets realised by the productive activity of producer or institutional units. GFCF includes acquisition less disposals of, e.g. buildings, structures, machinery and equipment, mineral exploration, computer software, literary or artistic originals and major improvements to land such as the clearance of forests. Values are seasonally and calendar adjusted (SCA). The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross fixed capital formation (GFCF, ESA 2010, 3.124), also known as Investments, consists of resident producers' acquisitions, less disposals, of fixed assets during a given period plus certain additions to the value of non-produced assets. These assets acquired are intended for use in processes of production. GFCF includes acquisition less disposals of, e.g. buildings, structures, machinery and equipment, mineral exploration, computer software, literary or artistic originals and major improvements to land such as the clearance of forests (ESA 2010, 3.127). Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross national income (at market prices) (ESA 2010, 8.94) represents total primary income receivable by resident institutional units: compensation of employees, taxes on production and imports less subsidies, property income (receivable less payable), gross operating surplus and gross mixed income. It is equal to: GDP (Gross Domestic Product) + primary income receivable by resident institutional units from the rest of the world - primary incomes payable to the rest of the world. Values are seasonally and calendar adjusted (SCA). The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The non-financial Annual Sector Accounts (ASA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts (ESA 2010) and are transmitted by the EU Member States, EEA Members (Norway, Iceland) and Switzerland following ESA2010 transmission programme(Table 8) established by the Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union, annexes A and B respectively). The ASA encompass non-financial accounts that provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The ASA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and interactions between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 2010 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1 and S.2, in turn, more detailed subsectors are distinguished as explained in more detail in section "3.2 Classification system". Data are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasa_10_nf_tr). The table contains data, as far as they are available, expressed in national currency and millions of euro in current prices. In line with ESA2010 Transmission programme requirements data series start from 1995 (unless subject to voluntary transmission option and/or country specific derogations). Countries may transmit longer series on voluntary basis. Available level of detail by sectors and transactions may also vary by country due to voluntary transmission of some items (as defined in ESA2010 transmission programme) and country specific derogations. ASA collected according ESA2010 Transmission programme include selected data on employment (in persons and hours worked) by institutional sectors. However, as transmission of these variables is voluntary (except for the sector of General government), data availability may vary significantly across countries. A set of key indicators, deemed meaningful for economic analysis, is available in the table "Key indicators" (nasa_10_ki) for most of the members of the European Economic Area (EEA), of the Euro area and EU. Key ratios are derived from non-financial transactions as follows:Gross household saving rate (S.14_S.15): B8G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of households (S.14_S.15): P51G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of non-financial corporations (S.11): P51G/B1G*100Gross profit share of non-financial corporations (S.11): B2G_B3G/B1G*100Total investment to GDP ratio (S.1): P51G/B1GQ*100Business investment to GDP ratio (S.11+S.12): P51G/B1GQ*100Government investment to GDP ratio (S.13): P51G/B1GQ*100Households investment to GDP ratio (S.14_S.15): P51G/B1GQ*100 With the following transaction codes:B8G -  Gross savingB6G - Gross disposable incomeD8rec / D8pay - the adjustment for the change in pension entitlements (receivable / payable)P51G - Gross fixed capital formationB1G - Gross value addedB1GQ – Gross domestic productB2G_B3G - Gross operating surplus/ mixed income. In the above, all ratios are expressed in gross terms, i.e. before deduction of consumption of fixed capital. The following key indicators combine non-financial with financial accounts:Gross return on capital employed, before taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [B2G_B3G/(AF2+AF3+AF4+AF5, liab)]*100Net debt-to-income ratio, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): ([(AF2+AF3+AF4, liab)/(B4N-D5pay)]*100)Net return on equity, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [(B4N-D5pay)/(AF5, liab)]*100Gross debt-to-income ratio of households (S.14_15): [(AF4, liab)/(B6G+D8net)]*100Household net financial assets ratio (BF90/(B6G+D8net)) With the following codes (the codes already described above have not been listed):B4N - Net entrepreneurial incomeD5pay - Current taxes on income and wealthAF2 - Currency and depositsAF3 - Debt securities (excluding financial derivatives)AF4 - LoansAF5 - Equity and investment fund sharesBF90 – Financial net worth "rec" means resources, that is transactions that add to the economic value of a given sector. "pay" means "uses", that is transactions that reduce the economic value of a given sector. "liab" refers to the stock of liabilities incurred by a given sector and recorded in the financial balance sheets. See also the sector accounts dedicated website for more information.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross saving (ESA 2010, 8.96) measures the portion of gross national disposable income that is not used for final consumption expenditure. Gross national saving is the sum of the gross savings of the various institutional sectors. Values are seasonally and calendar adjusted (SCA). The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE A = Agriculture, forestry, fishing. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE A = Agriculture, forestry, fishing. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE B+C+D+E = Mining and quarrying, manufacturing, electricity, gas and water supply, water supply, sewerage, waste management and remediation activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE B+C+D+E = Mining and quarrying, manufacturing, electricity, gas and water supply, sewerage, waste management and remediation activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE C = Manufacturing. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE C = Manufacturing. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE F = Construction. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE F = Construction. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE G+H+I = Wholesale and retail trade, repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles, transportation and storage, accommodation and food service activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE G+H+I = Wholesale and retail trade, repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles, transportation and storage, accommodation and food service activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE J = Information and communication. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE J = Information and communication. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE K = Financial and insurance activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE K = Financial and insurance activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE L = Real estate activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE L = Real estate activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE M + N = Professional, scientific and technical activities; administrative and support service activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE M+N = Professional, scientific and technical activities; administrative and support service activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE O+P+Q = Public administration and defence, compulsory social security, education, human health and social work activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE O+P+Q = Public administration and defence, compulsory social security, education, human health and social work activities. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE R+S+T+U = Arts, entertainment and recreation, repair of household goods and other services. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is available in a breakdown by 10 main economic activities according to NACE Rev. 2 (Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community). NACE R+S+T+U = Arts, entertainment and recreation, repair of household goods and other services. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is conceptually close to GDP (Gross domestic product), but unlike GDP available in a breakdown by branch of economic activity. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Gross Value Added (GVA) (ESA 2010, 9.31) is defined as output value at basic prices less intermediate consumption valued at purchasers' prices. GVA is calculated before consumption of fixed capital. GVA is conceptually close to GDP (Gross domestic product), but unlike GDP available in a breakdown by branch of economic activity. The ESA 2010 (European System of Accounts) regulation may be referred to for more specific explanations on methodology. Data are calculated as chain-linked volumes (i.e. data at previous year's prices, linked over the years via appropriate growth rates). Growth rates 'q/q-1 (sca)' with respect to the previous quarter and 'q/q-4 (sca)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from calendar and seasonally adjusted figures while growth rates 'q/q-4 (nsa)' with respect to the same quarter of the previous year are calculated from raw data.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information on the transition from ESA 95 to ESA 2010 is presented on the Eurostat website. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income) The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income)namq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes.
    • October 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • March 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 April, 2014
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:nama_r_e3vab95r2 Branch accounts include data on gross value added, compensation of employees, gross fixed capital formation, total employment and number of employees. The legal base for the collection of branch accounts data is the European System of Accounts ESA95. The ESA95 data are sent to Eurostat by the National Statistical Institutes. The units for these variables are: Millions of national currency and millions of Euro for gross value added, compensation of employees and gross fixed capital formation. 1000 persons for total employment and number of employees at NUTS level 3 1000 hours worked for total employment and number of employees at NUTS level 2 Geographical coverage comprises all EU Member States and some Candidate countries down to Nuts 3 level (Nuts = "Nomenclature of territorial units for statistics" - see Eurostat's classification server "RAMON") for the variables gross value added, total employment and number of employees. Compensation of employees, employment in hours worked and gross fixed capital formation are only collected down to Nuts 2 level. For further information about sources and collection methods in the Member States, please refer to National Statistical Institutes (select Services - Links).
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data are the result of the annual structure of government debt survey and cover the EU countries as well as Norway. The following series are available: Central government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; State government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Local government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Social security funds gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; General government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Debt by currency of issuance; Government guarantees (contingent liabilities).
  • H
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The 'LFS main indicators' section presents a selection of the main statistics on the labour market. They encompass indicators of activity employment and unemployment. Those indicators are based on the results of the European Labour Force Survey (EU-LFS), in few cases integrated with data sources like national accounts employment or registered unemployment. As a result of the application of adjustments, corrections and reconciliation of EU Labour Force Survey (EU-LFS), 'LFS main indicators' is the most complete and reliable collection of employment and unemployment data available in the sub-domain ' Employment and unemployment'. The EU-LFS data used for 'LFS main indicators' are, where necessary, adjusted and enriched in various ways, in accordance with the specificities of an indicator.  The most common adjustments cover: - correction of the main breaks in the LFS series - estimation of the missing values, (i.e. in case of missing quarters, annual results and EU aggregates are estimated using adjusted quarterly national labour force survey data or interpolations of the EU Labour Force Survey data with reference to the available quarter(s)) - reconciliations of the LFS data with other sources, mainly National Accounts (for Employment growth and activity branches) and national statistics on monthly unemployment (for Harmonised unemployment series). - for a number of indicators (employment, activity, unemployment, supplementary indicators) seasonally adjusted data are available Those adjustments may produce some differences between data published under 'LFS main indicators' and 'LFS series - Detailed survey results', particularly for back data. For the most recent years these two series converge, due to the implementation of a continuous quarterly survey and the improved quality of the data. This page focuses on the particularities of 'LFS main indicators' in general. There are special pages for indicators 'employment growth', 'population in jobless households', 'average exit age of labour market' and 'education indicators: life-long learning, early school leavers and youth education attainment level. General information on the EU-LFS can be found in the ESMS page for 'Employment and unemployment (LFS)', see link in related metada. Detailed information on the main features, the legal basis, the methodology and the data as well as on the historical development of the EU-LFS is available on the EU-LFS (Statistics Explained) webpage.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised Indices of Consumer Prices (HICP) are designed for international comparisons of consumer price inflation. HICPs are used for the assessment of the inflation convergence criterion as required under Article 121 of the Treaty of Amsterdam and by the ECB for assessing price stability for monetary policy purposes. The ECB defines price stability on the basis of the annual rate of change of the euro area HICP. HICPs are compiled on the basis of harmonised standards, binding for all Member States. Conceptually, the HICP are Laspeyres-type price indices and are computed as annual chain-indices allowing for weights changing each year. The common classification for Harmonized Indices of Consumer Prices is the COICOP (Classification Of Individual COnsumption by Purpose). A version of this classification (COICOP/HICP) has been specially adapted for the HICP. Sub-indices published by Eurostat are based on this classification. HICP are produced and published using a common index reference period (2015 = 100). Growth rates are calculated from published index levels. Indexes, as well as both growth rates with respect to the previous month (M/M-1) and with respect to the corresponding month of the previous year (M/M-12) are neither calendar nor seasonally adjusted.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised Indices of Consumer Prices (HICP) are designed for international comparisons of consumer price inflation. HICPs are used for the assessment of the inflation convergence criterion as required under Article 121 of the Treaty of Amsterdam and by the ECB for assessing price stability for monetary policy purposes. The ECB defines price stability on the basis of the annual rate of change of the euro area HICP. HICPs are compiled on the basis of harmonised standards, binding for all Member States. Conceptually, the HICP are Laspeyres-type price indices and are computed as annual chain-indices allowing for weights changing each year. The common classification for Harmonized Indices of Consumer Prices is the COICOP (Classification Of Individual COnsumption by Purpose). A version of this classification (COICOP/HICP) has been specially adapted for the HICP. Sub-indices published by Eurostat are based on this classification. HICP are produced and published using a common index reference period (2015 = 100). Growth rates are calculated from published index levels. Indexes, as well as both growth rates with respect to the previous month (M/M-1) and with respect to the corresponding month of the previous year (M/M-12) are neither calendar nor seasonally adjusted.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised Indices of Consumer Prices (HICP) are designed for international comparisons of consumer price inflation. HICPs are used for the assessment of the inflation convergence criterion as required under Article 121 of the Treaty of Amsterdam and by the ECB for assessing price stability for monetary policy purposes. The ECB defines price stability on the basis of the annual rate of change of the euro area HICP. HICPs are compiled on the basis of harmonised standards, binding for all Member States. Conceptually, the HICP are Laspeyres-type price indices and are computed as annual chain-indices allowing for weights changing each year. The common classification for Harmonized Indices of Consumer Prices is the COICOP (Classification Of Individual COnsumption by Purpose). A version of this classification (COICOP/HICP) has been specially adapted for the HICP. Sub-indices published by Eurostat are based on this classification. HICP are produced and published using a common index reference period (2015 = 100). Growth rates are calculated from published index levels. Indexes, as well as both growth rates with respect to the previous month (M/M-1) and with respect to the corresponding month of the previous year (M/M-12) are neither calendar nor seasonally adjusted.
    • March 2010
      Source: Maddison Project
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Select Dataset
      Historical Statistics on Population, GDP and Per Capita GDP for 1-2008 AD period. Copyright Angus Maddison.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The deflated house price index (or real house price index) is the ratio between the house price index (HPI) and the national accounts deflator for private final consumption expenditure (households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs)). This indicator therefore measures inflation in the house market relative to inflation in the final consumption expenditure of households and NPIs. Eurostat HPI captures price changes of all residential properties purchased by households (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.), both new and existing, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered, self-build dwellings are therefore excluded. The land component is included. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the year-on-year growth rate of the deflated house price index. In the MIP domain are also published annual and quarterly figures on: House price index, deflated – average index and rate of changeHouse price index – average rate of change, index and % change T/T-3
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The deflated house price index (or real house price index) is the ratio between the house price index (HPI) and the national accounts deflator for private final consumption expenditure (households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs)). This indicator therefore measures inflation in the house market relative to inflation in the final consumption expenditure of households and NPIs. Eurostat HPI captures price changes of all residential properties purchased by households (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.), both new and existing, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered, self-build dwellings are therefore excluded. The land component is included. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the year-on-year growth rate of the deflated house price index. In the MIP domain are also published annual and quarterly figures on: House price index, deflated – average index and rate of changeHouse price index – average rate of change, index and % change T/T-3
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The deflated house price index (or real house price index) is the ratio between the house price index (HPI) and the national accounts deflator for private final consumption expenditure (households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs)). This indicator therefore measures inflation in the house market relative to inflation in the final consumption expenditure of households and NPIs. Eurostat HPI captures price changes of all residential properties purchased by households (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.), both new and existing, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered, self-build dwellings are therefore excluded. The land component is included. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the year-on-year growth rate of the deflated house price index. In the MIP domain are also published annual and quarterly figures on: House price index, deflated – average index and rate of changeHouse price index – average rate of change, index and % change T/T-3
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The deflated house price index (or real house price index) is the ratio between the house price index (HPI) and the national accounts deflator for private final consumption expenditure (households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs)). This indicator therefore measures inflation in the house market relative to inflation in the final consumption expenditure of households and NPIs. Eurostat HPI captures price changes of all residential properties purchased by households (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.), both new and existing, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered, self-build dwellings are therefore excluded. The land component is included. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the year-on-year growth rate of the deflated house price index. In the MIP domain are also published annual and quarterly figures on: House price index, deflated – average index and rate of changeHouse price index – average rate of change, index and % change T/T-3
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side.nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The non-financial Annual Sector Accounts (ASA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts (ESA 2010) and are transmitted by the EU Member States, EEA Members (Norway, Iceland) and Switzerland following ESA2010 transmission programme(Table 8) established by the Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union, annexes A and B respectively). The ASA encompass non-financial accounts that provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The ASA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and interactions between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 2010 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1 and S.2, in turn, more detailed subsectors are distinguished as explained in more detail in section "3.2 Classification system". Data are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasa_10_nf_tr). The table contains data, as far as they are available, expressed in national currency and millions of euro in current prices. In line with ESA2010 Transmission programme requirements data series start from 1995 (unless subject to voluntary transmission option and/or country specific derogations). Countries may transmit longer series on voluntary basis. Available level of detail by sectors and transactions may also vary by country due to voluntary transmission of some items (as defined in ESA2010 transmission programme) and country specific derogations. ASA collected according ESA2010 Transmission programme include selected data on employment (in persons and hours worked) by institutional sectors. However, as transmission of these variables is voluntary (except for the sector of General government), data availability may vary significantly across countries. A set of key indicators, deemed meaningful for economic analysis, is available in the table "Key indicators" (nasa_10_ki) for most of the members of the European Economic Area (EEA), of the Euro area and EU. Key ratios are derived from non-financial transactions as follows:Gross household saving rate (S.14_S.15): B8G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of households (S.14_S.15): P51G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of non-financial corporations (S.11): P51G/B1G*100Gross profit share of non-financial corporations (S.11): B2G_B3G/B1G*100Total investment to GDP ratio (S.1): P51G/B1GQ*100Business investment to GDP ratio (S.11+S.12): P51G/B1GQ*100Government investment to GDP ratio (S.13): P51G/B1GQ*100Households investment to GDP ratio (S.14_S.15): P51G/B1GQ*100 With the following transaction codes:B8G -  Gross savingB6G - Gross disposable incomeD8rec / D8pay - the adjustment for the change in pension entitlements (receivable / payable)P51G - Gross fixed capital formationB1G - Gross value addedB1GQ – Gross domestic productB2G_B3G - Gross operating surplus/ mixed income. In the above, all ratios are expressed in gross terms, i.e. before deduction of consumption of fixed capital. The following key indicators combine non-financial with financial accounts:Gross return on capital employed, before taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [B2G_B3G/(AF2+AF3+AF4+AF5, liab)]*100Net debt-to-income ratio, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): ([(AF2+AF3+AF4, liab)/(B4N-D5pay)]*100)Net return on equity, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [(B4N-D5pay)/(AF5, liab)]*100Gross debt-to-income ratio of households (S.14_15): [(AF4, liab)/(B6G+D8net)]*100Household net financial assets ratio (BF90/(B6G+D8net)) With the following codes (the codes already described above have not been listed):B4N - Net entrepreneurial incomeD5pay - Current taxes on income and wealthAF2 - Currency and depositsAF3 - Debt securities (excluding financial derivatives)AF4 - LoansAF5 - Equity and investment fund sharesBF90 – Financial net worth "rec" means resources, that is transactions that add to the economic value of a given sector. "pay" means "uses", that is transactions that reduce the economic value of a given sector. "liab" refers to the stock of liabilities incurred by a given sector and recorded in the financial balance sheets. See also the sector accounts dedicated website for more information.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 March, 2018
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      The gross saving rate of households (including Non-Profit Institutions Serving Households) is defined as gross saving (ESA2010 code: B8G) divided by gross disposable income (B6G), with the latter being adjusted for the change in in pension entitlements (D8net). Gross saving is the part of the gross disposable income which is not spent as final consumption expenditure. The indicator is based on data from annual non-financial sector accounts. For more information please refer to Eurobase domain nasa_10_nf_tr.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2019
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      The domain "Income and living conditions" covers four topics: people at risk of poverty or social exclusion, income distribution and monetary poverty, living conditions and material deprivation, which are again structured into collections of indicators on specific topics. The collection "People at risk of poverty or social exclusion" houses main indicator on risk of poverty or social inclusion included in the Europe 2020 strategy as well as the intersections between sub-populations of all Europe 2020 indicators on poverty and social exclusion. The collection "Income distribution and monetary poverty" houses collections of indicators relating to poverty risk, poverty risk of working individuals as well as the distribution of income. The collection "Living conditions" hosts indicators relating to characteristics and living conditions of households, characteristics of the population according to different breakdowns, health and labour conditions, housing conditions as well as childcare related indicators. The collection "Material deprivation" covers indicators relating to economic strain, durables, housing deprivation and environment of the dwelling.
  • I
    • July 2018
      Source: International Centre for Tax and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 May, 2019
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      Data cited at: ICTD/UNU-WIDER, ‘Government Revenue Dataset’, 2018, https://www.wider.unu.edu/project/government-revenue-dataset' ICTD Government Revenue Dataset, 2018 A major obstacle to cross-country research on the role of revenue and taxation in development has been the weakness of available data. Government Revenue Dataset (GRD), developed through the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD), is aimed at overcoming this obstacle. It meticulously combines data from several major international databases, as well as drawing on data compiled from all available International Monetary Fund (IMF) Article IV reports. It achieves marked improvements in data coverage and accuracy, including a standardized approach to revenue from natural resources, and holds the promise of significant improvement in the credibility and robustness of research in this area. Dataset contains Central, General and merged government revenue data reported as % of GDP.
    • October 2019
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 October, 2019
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      The World Economic Outlook (WEO) database contains selected macroeconomic data series from the statistical appendix of the World Economic Outlook report, which presents the IMF staff's analysis and projections of economic developments at the global level, in major country groups and in many individual countries. The WEO is released in April and September/October each year.
    • June 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 July, 2017
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      The implicit tax rate on employed labour is defined as the sum of all direct and indirect taxes and employees' and employers' social contributions levied on employed labour income divided by the total compensation of employees working in the economic territory increased by taxes on wage bill and payroll. The ITR on labour is calculated for employed labour only (so excluding the tax burden falling on social transfers, including pensions). The implicit tax rate on labour should be seen as a summary measure that approximates an average effective tax burden on labour income in the economy. Source: Structures of the taxation systems in the European Union
    • June 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
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    • April 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 April, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Short-term statistics (STS) give information on a wide range of economic activities according to NACE Rev.2 classification (Statistical Classification of Economic Activities in the European Community). The industrial import price indices offer information according to the CPA classification (Statistical Classification of Products by Activity in the European Economic Community). Construction indices are broken down by Classification of Types of Construction (CC). All data under this heading are index data. Percentage changes are also available for each indicator. The index data are generally presented in the following forms:UnadjustedCalendar adjustedSeasonally adjusted Depending on the STS regulation data are accessible as monthly, quarterly and annual data. This heading covers the indicators listed below in four different sectors. Based on the national data, Eurostat compiles EU and euro area infra-annual economic statistics. Among these, a list of indicators, called Principal European Economic Indicators (PEEIs) has been identified by key users as being of prime importance for the conduct of monetary and economic policy of the euro area. These indicators are mainly released through Eurostat's website under the heading Euro-indicators. There are eight PEEIs contributed by STS and they are marked with * in the text below. INDUSTRYProduction (volume)*Turnover: Total, Domestic market and Non-domestic market==> A further breakdown of the non-domestic turnover into euro area and non euro area is available for the euro area countriesProducer prices (output prices)*: Total, Domestic market and Non-domestic market==> A further breakdown of the non-domestic producer prices into euro area and non euro area is available for the euro area countriesImport prices*: Total, Euro area market, Non euro area market (euro area countries only)Labour input indicators: Number of persons employed, Hours worked, Gross wages and salaries CONSTRUCTIONProduction (volume)*: Total of the construction sector, Building construction, Civil EngineeringBuilding permits indicators*: Number of dwellings, Square meters of useful floor (or alternative size measure)Construction costs or prices: Construction costs, Material costs, Labour costs (if not available, they may be approximated by the Output prices variable)Labour input indicators: Number of persons employed, Hours worked, Gross wages and salaries WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADEVolume of sales (deflated turnover)*Turnover (value)Labour input indicators: Number of persons employed, Hours worked, Gross wages and salaries SERVICESTurnover (in value)*Labour input indicators: Number of persons employed, Hours worked, Gross wages and salariesProducer prices (Output prices )* National reference metadata of the reporting countries can be found in the Annexes of this metadata file.
    • April 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2015
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    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side.nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 October, 2016
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    • February 2019
      Source: Heritage Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 February, 2019
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      Data cited at: Heritage Foundation   Economic freedom is the fundamental right of every human to control his or her own labor and property. In an economically free society, individuals are free to work, produce, consume, and invest in any way they please, with that freedom both protected by the state and unconstrained by the state. In economically free societies, governments allow labor, capital and goods to move freely, and refrain from coercion or constraint of liberty beyond the extent necessary to protect and maintain liberty itself. Economic Freedom Scores: Range and level of freedom 80–100:- Free 70–79.9:- Mostly Free 60–69.9:- Moderately Free 50–59.9:- Mostly Unfree 0–49.9:- Repressed
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 July, 2012
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      This Dataset contains 4 Tables. Index of purchasing power of the euro/ECU - Annual data (mny_ppe_a) Index of purchasing power of the euro/ECU - Quarterly data (mny_ppe_q) Index of purchasing power of the euro/ECU - Monthly data (mny_ppe_m). Capital raised on stock markets (mny_h_caprais) Note: Eurostat Hierarchy: Economy and finance > Monetary and other financial statistics (mny) > Monetary and other financial statistics: historical data (mny_h) > Index of purchasing power of the euro/ECU (mny_h_ppe).
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 July, 2019
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      Data given in this domain are collected annually by the National Statistical Institutes and are based on Eurostat's annual model questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage in households and by individuals. The model questionnaire changes every year. The changes of questions in the MQ are required by the evolving situation of information and communication technologies. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the follow up of the Digital Single Market process (Monitoring the Digital Economy & Society  2016-2021). This conceptual framework follows the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework, the i2010 Benchmarking Framework and the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. ICT usage data are also used in the Consumer Conditions Scoreboard (purchases over the Internet) and in the Employment Guidelines (e-skills of individuals). The aim of the European ICT surveys is the timely provision of statistics on individuals and households on the use of Information and Communication Technologies at European level. Data for this collection are supplied directly from the surveys with no separate treatment. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: access to and use of ICTs by individuals and/or in households,use of the Internet and other electronic networks for different purposes by individuals and/or in households,ICT security and trust,ICT competence and skills,barriers to the use of ICT and the Internet,perceived effects of ICT usage on individuals and/or on households,use of ICT by individuals to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),access to and use of technologies enabling connection to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns (see details of available breakdowns): Relating to households: by region of residence (NUTS 1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area) by type of householdby households net monthly income (optional) Relating to individuals: by region of residence (NUTS1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation: (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area)by genderby country of birth, country of citizenship (as of 2010, optional in 2010)by educational level: ISCED 1997 up to 2013 and ISCED 2011 from 2014 onwards.by occupation: manual, non-manual; ICT (coded by 2-digit ISCO categories)/non-ICT (optional: all 2-digit ISCO categories)by employment situationby age (in completed years and by groups)legal / de facto marital status (2011-2014, optional) Regional breakdowns (NUTS) are available only for a selection of indicators disseminated in the regional tables in Eurobase (Regional Information society statistics by NUTS regions (isoc_reg): Households with access to the internet at homeHouseholds with broadband accessIndividuals who have never used a computerIndividuals who used the internet, frequency of use and activitiesIndividuals who used the internet for interaction with public authoritiesIndividuals who ordered goods or services over the internet for private useIndividuals who accessed the internet away from home or work
    • January 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 August, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:ei_bsin_q_bc Six qualitative surveys are conducted on a monthly basis in the following areas: manufacturing industry, construction, consumers, retail trade, services and financial services. Some additional questions are asked on a quarterly basis in the surveys in industry, services, financial services, construction and among consumers. In addition, a survey is conducted twice a year on Investment in the manufacturing sector. The domain consists of a selection for variables from the following type of survey: Industry monthly questions for: production, employment expectations, order-book levels, stocks of finished products and selling price. Industry quarterly questions for:production capacity, order-books, new orders, export expectations, capacity utilization, Competitive position and factors limiting the production. Construction monthly questions for: trend of activity, order books, employment expectations, price expectations and factors limiting building activity. Construction quarterly questions for: operating time ensured by current backlog. Retail sales monthly questions for: business situation, stocks of goods, orders placed with suppliers and firm's employment. Services monthly questions for: business climate, evolution of demand, evolution of employment and selling prices. Services quarterly question for: factors limiting their business Consumer monthly questions for: financial situation, general economic situation, price trends, unemployment, major purchases and savings. Consumer quarterly questions for: intention to buy a car, purchase or build a home, home improvements. Financial services monthly questions for: business situation, evolution of demand and employment Financial services quarterly questions for: operating income, operating expenses, profitability of the company, capital expenditure and competitive position Monthly Confidence Indicators are computed for industry, services, construction, retail trade, consumers (at country level, EU and euro area level) and financial services (EU and euro area). An Economic Sentiment indicator (ESI) is calculated based on a selection of questions from industry, services, construction, retail trade and consumers at country level and aggregate level (EU and euro area). A monthly Euro-zone Business Climate Indicator is also available for industry. The data are published:as balance i.e. the difference between positive and negative answers (in percentage points of total answers)as indexas confidence indicators (arithmetic average of balances),at current level of capacity utilization (percentage)estimated months of production assured by orders (number of months)Unadjusted (NSA) and seasonally adjusted (SA)
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 October, 2019
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:sbs_sc_ind_r2 SBS covers the Nace Rev.2 Section B to N and division S95 which are organized in four annexes, covering Industry (sections B-E), Construction (F), Trade (G) and Services (H, I, J, L, M, N and S95). Financial services are covered in three specific annexes and separate metadata files have been compiled. Up to reference year 2007 data was presented using the NACE Rev.1.1 classification. The SBS coverage was limited to NACE Rev.1.1 Sections C to K. Starting from the reference year 2008 data is available in NACE Rev.2. Double reported data in NACE Rev.1.1 for the reference year 2008 will be available in the first and second quarter of 2011. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category:Business Demographic variables (e.g. number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables               - labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked)               - goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases)               - capital input (e.g. Material investments) Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4 digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' in NACE Rev 1.1 sections H, I, K have been aggregated. Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available. Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009.  For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by N°1614/2002 and N°1669/2003. SBS data are collected primarily by National Statistical Institutes (NSI). Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provides the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE  Rev 1.1 Section J). 
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
    • October 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
      International investment position (assets, liabilities and net position); broken down by investment category, financial instruments and by sectors of the economy. Data are presented in millions of Euro/ECU. Geographic coverage: Euro area and EU27 Member States. Data are delivered by ECB.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BOP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, primary and secondary income), as well as on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. International investment position presents value of financial assets owned outside the economy and indebtedness of the economy to the rest of the world. BOP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit for current and capital acount, net acquisition of financial assets or net incurrence of liabilities for BOP financial account and international investment position) towards the external world. Out of BOP data, some indicators on international position of the EU and Member States are derived. Indicators on Main Balance of Payments and International Investment Position items as share of GDP are presented as percentage of GDP for given year or quarter and moving average for 3 consecutive years for: Balance, credit and debit flows of current and capital accounts and of main current account  items: goods, services, primary and secondary income,Net flows, net acquisition of financial assets and net incurrence of liabilities for total financial account and foreign direct investment,International investment position and net external debt at the end of reference quarter or year. Indicators on export market shares present shares of each EU Member State in total world exports of goods and services for given year, and 1-year and 5-year percentage changes of these shares, as well as shares in OECD exports and 5-year percentage changes of these shares.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2019
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      The international investment position (IIP) is a statistical statement that provides an aggregate view of the net financial position (assets minus liabilities) of a country vis-à-vis the rest of the world. It allows for a stock-flow analysis of external position of a country. It shows at a point in time the value and composition of: financial assets of residents of an economy that are claims on non-residents and gold bullion held as reserve assets, andliabilities of residents of an economy to non-residents. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the net international investment position expressed as % of GDP. Additionally are published data for the different functional categories (Direct investment; Portfolio investment; Financial derivatives (other than reserves) and employee stock options (ESOs) and Other investment) in % of GDP and national currency.
    • December 2018
      Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The International Macroeconomic Data Set provides historical and projected data for 189 countries that account for more than 99 percent of the world economy. These macroeconomic data and projections are assembled explicitly to serve as underlying assumptions for the annually updated USDA agricultural supply and demand projections, which provide a 10-year outlook on U.S. and global agriculture. The macroeconomic projections describe the long-term scenario that is used as a benchmark for analyzing the impacts of alternative scenarios and macroeconomic shocks.  The projections assume there are no changes in policy and abstract from business cycle effects.  Historical data are available for real (inflation-adjusted) gross domestic product (GDP), inflation, population, and real exchange rates from 1969 to the most recent available year, and each variable is projected forward to 2030.
    • June 2013
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 July, 2013
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      Time series on international reserves (including gold), by individual country, expressed in millions of dollars. It further presents the number of months of merchandise imports that these reserves could finance at current imports level, as well as annual changes in total reserves.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services (ITS), a component of BoP current account, are used, alongside with data on Foreign Direct Investment (a component of BoP financial account), to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports. Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU and in millions of national currency. Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. These are described in the International Trade in Services EU 1992-2001 - Compilation guide. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat uses as a base for its work the OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment Third Edition, a detailed operational definition fully consistent with the IMF Balance of Payments Manual, Fifth Edition, BPM5. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by an entity resident in one economy (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an enterprise operating in another economy (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the direct investor acquires at least 10% of the voting power of the direct investment enterprise. FDI statistics record separately: 1) Inward FDI (or FDI in the reporting economy), namely investment by foreigners in enterprises resident in the reporting economy. 2) Outward FDI (or FDIabroad), namely investment by residents entities in affiliated enterprises abroad. FDI statistics record both the initial investment and all subsequent investment made by the direct investor, either in the form of equity capital, or in the form of loans, or in the form of reinvesting earnings. Investment made through other affiliated enterprises of the same group of the direct investor should also be recorded according to the international methodology. There are three main indicators: FDI flows, stocks and income. The indicators described in more detail below are presented in the complete tables with a breakdown by partner country or region and a breakdown by the kind of activity in which FDI is made. In the table called "Main indicators" there is a reduced breakdown by partners and data for total activity only. See the part on classification system for more detail. See also the User's guideon the structure on the database and for practical information on data downloading. 1) FDI flows denote the new investment made during the period. FDI flows are recorded in the Balance of Payments financial account. Total FDI flows are broken down by kind of instrument used for making the investment:Equity capital comprises equity in branches, all shares in subsidiaries and associates (except non-participating, preferred shares that are treated as debt securities and are included under other FDI capital) and other contributions such as the provision of machinery.Reinvested earnings consist of the direct investor's share (in proportion to equity participation) of earnings not distributed by the direct investment enterprise. Reinvested earnings are an imputed transaction. Reinvested earnings are also recorded with opposite sign among FDI income (see below). This recording represents not distributed income as being earned by the direct investor and reinvested in the direct investment enterprise at the same time.Other FDI capital (loans) covers the borrowing and lending of funds, including debt securities and trade credits between direct investors and direct investment enterprises. Debt transactions between affiliated financial intermediaries recorded under direct investment flows are limited to permanent debt. 2) FDI stocks (or positions) denote the value of the investment at the end of the period. FDI stocks are recorded in the International Investment Position. Outward FDI stocks are recorded as assets of the reporting economy, inward FDI stocks as liabilities. Similarly with flows, FDI stocks are broken down by kind of instrument. However, there are only two categories instead of three:Equity capital and reinvested earnings is the value of the own capital of the enterprise, including the value of own reserves that are accumulated from past reinvested earnings. Reserves corresponding to reinvested earnings are not shown separately from other equity capital as in the case of flows.Other FDI capital is the stock of debts (assets or liabilities) between the direct investors and the direct investment enterprise. 3) FDI income is the income accruing to direct investors during the period. FDI income is recorded in the current account of the Balance of Payments. Total FDI income is broken down by kind of income. The categories of FDI income available are linked to the breakdown of FDI flows and stocks by kind of instrument, namely:Dividends Dividends payable in the period and branch profits remitted to the direct investor, gross of any withholding taxes. Dividends include payments due on common and preferred shares.Reinvested earnings See definition under FDI flows.Interest on loans Interest accrued in the period on loans (other FDI capital) with affiliated enterprises, gross of any withholding tax. 4) FDI intensity Out of FDI annual data, an indicator useful to measure EU market integration is also calculated and disseminated in the domain Structural Indicators:FDI intensity as % of GDP: Average of inward and outward FDI flows divided by GDP. A higher index indicates higher new FDI during the period in relation to the size of the economy as measured by GDP. If this index increases over time, then the country/zone is becoming more integrated with the international economy.
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      20.1. Source data
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The non-financial Annual Sector Accounts (ASA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts (ESA 2010) and are transmitted by the EU Member States, EEA Members (Norway, Iceland) and Switzerland following ESA2010 transmission programme(Table 8) established by the Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union, annexes A and B respectively). The ASA encompass non-financial accounts that provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The ASA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and interactions between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 2010 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1 and S.2, in turn, more detailed subsectors are distinguished as explained in more detail in section "3.2 Classification system". Data are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasa_10_nf_tr). The table contains data, as far as they are available, expressed in national currency and millions of euro in current prices. In line with ESA2010 Transmission programme requirements data series start from 1995 (unless subject to voluntary transmission option and/or country specific derogations). Countries may transmit longer series on voluntary basis. Available level of detail by sectors and transactions may also vary by country due to voluntary transmission of some items (as defined in ESA2010 transmission programme) and country specific derogations. ASA collected according ESA2010 Transmission programme include selected data on employment (in persons and hours worked) by institutional sectors. However, as transmission of these variables is voluntary (except for the sector of General government), data availability may vary significantly across countries. A set of key indicators, deemed meaningful for economic analysis, is available in the table "Key indicators" (nasa_10_ki) for most of the members of the European Economic Area (EEA), of the Euro area and EU. Key ratios are derived from non-financial transactions as follows:Gross household saving rate (S.14_S.15): B8G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of households (S.14_S.15): P51G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of non-financial corporations (S.11): P51G/B1G*100Gross profit share of non-financial corporations (S.11): B2G_B3G/B1G*100Total investment to GDP ratio (S.1): P51G/B1GQ*100Business investment to GDP ratio (S.11+S.12): P51G/B1GQ*100Government investment to GDP ratio (S.13): P51G/B1GQ*100Households investment to GDP ratio (S.14_S.15): P51G/B1GQ*100 With the following transaction codes:B8G -  Gross savingB6G - Gross disposable incomeD8rec / D8pay - the adjustment for the change in pension entitlements (receivable / payable)P51G - Gross fixed capital formationB1G - Gross value addedB1GQ – Gross domestic productB2G_B3G - Gross operating surplus/ mixed income. In the above, all ratios are expressed in gross terms, i.e. before deduction of consumption of fixed capital. The following key indicators combine non-financial with financial accounts:Gross return on capital employed, before taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [B2G_B3G/(AF2+AF3+AF4+AF5, liab)]*100Net debt-to-income ratio, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): ([(AF2+AF3+AF4, liab)/(B4N-D5pay)]*100)Net return on equity, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [(B4N-D5pay)/(AF5, liab)]*100Gross debt-to-income ratio of households (S.14_15): [(AF4, liab)/(B6G+D8net)]*100Household net financial assets ratio (BF90/(B6G+D8net)) With the following codes (the codes already described above have not been listed):B4N - Net entrepreneurial incomeD5pay - Current taxes on income and wealthAF2 - Currency and depositsAF3 - Debt securities (excluding financial derivatives)AF4 - LoansAF5 - Equity and investment fund sharesBF90 – Financial net worth "rec" means resources, that is transactions that add to the economic value of a given sector. "pay" means "uses", that is transactions that reduce the economic value of a given sector. "liab" refers to the stock of liabilities incurred by a given sector and recorded in the financial balance sheets. See also the sector accounts dedicated website for more information.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • April 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
    • January 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 February, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the category of international investment made by a resident entity (direct investor) to acquire a lasting interest in an entity operating in an economy other than that of the investor (direct investment enterprise). The lasting interest is deemed to exist if the investor acquires at least 10% of the equity capital of the enterprise. For this indicator stocks of FDI in the reporting economy are expressed as percentage of GDP to remove the effect of differences in the size of the economies of the reporting countries.
  • K
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The non-financial Annual Sector Accounts (ASA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts (ESA 2010) and are transmitted by the EU Member States, EEA Members (Norway, Iceland) and Switzerland following ESA2010 transmission programme (Table 8) established by the Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union, annexes A and B respectively). The ASA encompass non-financial accounts that provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The ASA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and interactions between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 2010 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1 and S.2, in turn, more detailed subsectors are distinguished as explained in more detail in section "3.2 Classification system". Data are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasa_10_nf_tr). The table contains data, as far as they are available, expressed in national currency and millions of euro in current prices. In line with ESA2010 Transmission programme requirements data series start from 1995 (unless subject to voluntary transmission option and/or country specific derogations). Countries may transmit longer series on voluntary basis. Available level of detail by sectors and transactions may also vary by country due to voluntary transmission of some items (as defined in ESA2010 transmission programme) and country specific derogations. ASA collected according ESA2010 Transmission programme include selected data on employment (in persons and hours worked) by institutional sectors. However, as transmission of these variables is voluntary (except for the sector of General government), data availability may vary significantly across countries. A set of key indicators, deemed meaningful for economic analysis, is available in the table "Key indicators" (nasa_10_ki) for most of the members of the European Economic Area (EEA), of the Euro area and EU. Key ratios are derived from non-financial transactions as follows: Gross household saving rate (S.14_S.15): B8G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of households (S.14_S.15): P51G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of non-financial corporations (S.11): P51G/B1G*100Gross profit share of non-financial corporations (S.11): B2G_B3G/B1G*100Total investment to GDP ratio (S.1): P51G/B1GQ*100Business investment to GDP ratio: (S.11_P51G+S.12_P51G)/B1GQ*100Government investment to GDP ratio: S.13_P51G/B1GQ*100Households investment to GDP ratio: (S.14_S.15_P51G)/B1GQ*100 With the following transaction codes: B8G -  Gross savingB6G - Gross disposable incomeD8rec / D8pay - the adjustment for the change in pension entitlements (receivable / payable)P51G - Gross fixed capital formationB1G - Gross value addedB1GQ – Gross domestic productB2G_B3G - Gross operating surplus/ mixed income. In the above, all ratios are expressed in gross terms, i.e. before deduction of consumption of fixed capital. The following key indicators are calculated in real or nominal terms: Real growth of household adjusted disposable income per capita (percentage change on previous period, S.14_S.15): B7G/(POP_NC*Price Deflator)Nominal growth of household adjusted disposable income per capita (percentage change on previous period, S.14_S.15): B7G/(POP_NC)Real growth of household actual consumption per capita (percentage change on previous period, S.14_S.15): P4/(POP_NC*Price Deflator) With the following codes (the codes already described above have not been listed): B7G - Gross adjusted gross disposable income (adjusted for social transfers in kind)P4 - Actual final consumption (adjusted for social transfers in kind)POP_NC - Total population national concept (source:Quarterly national accounts, Eurobase domain namq_10_pe)Price deflator - Price index/implicit deflator calculated as CP_MEUR/CLV10_MEUR – both indicators refer to households and NPISH final consumption expenditure (P31_S14_S15) (source: Quarterly national accounts, Eurobase domain namq_10_gdp) The following key indicators combine non-financial with financial accounts: Gross return on capital employed, before taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [B2G_B3G/(AF2+AF3+AF4+AF5, liab)]*100Net debt-to-income ratio, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): ([(AF2+AF3+AF4, liab)/(B4N-D5pay)]*100)Net return on equity, after taxes, of non-financial corporations (S.11): [(B4N-D5pay)/(AF5, liab)]*100Gross debt-to-income ratio of households (S.14_15): [(AF4, liab)/(B6G+D8net)]*100Household net financial assets ratio (BF90/(B6G+D8net)) With the following codes (the codes already described above have not been listed): B4N - Net entrepreneurial incomeD5pay - Current taxes on income and wealthAF2 - Currency and depositsAF3 - Debt securities (excluding financial derivatives)AF4 - LoansAF5 - Equity and investment fund sharesBF90 – Financial net worth "rec" means resources, that is transactions that add to the economic value of a given sector. "pay" means "uses", that is transactions that reduce the economic value of a given sector. "liab" refers to the stock of liabilities incurred by a given sector and recorded in the financial balance sheets. See also the sector accounts dedicated website for more information.
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The non-financial Quarterly Sector Accounts (QSA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts (ESA 2010) and are transmitted by the EU Member States and EEA Members (Norway, Iceland) following ESA2010 transmission programme (Table 801) established by the Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013 on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union, annexes A and B respectively). The QSA encompass non-financial accounts that provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The ASA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and interactions between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 2010 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1 and S.2, in turn, more detailed subsectors are distinguished as explained in more detail in section "3.2 Classification system". Data are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasq_10_nf_tr). The table contains data, as far as they are available, expressed in national currency and millions of euro in current prices. In line with ESA2010 Transmission programme requirements data series start from 1999 Q1 (unless subject to voluntary transmission option and/or country specific derogations). Available level of detail by sectors and transactions may also vary by country due to voluntary transmission of some items (as defined in ESA2010 transmission programme) and country specific derogations. QSA collected according ESA2010 Transmission programme include selected data on employment (in persons and hours worked) and seasonally adjusted variables by institutional sectors. However, as transmission of these variables is voluntary (except for the selected seasonally adjusted variables of Total economy and the Rest of the world), data availability may vary significantly across countries. A set of key indicators, deemed meaningful for economic analysis, is available in the table "Key indicators" (nasq_10_ki) for most of the members of the European Economic Area (EEA), of the Euro area and EU. Key indicators are generally released in non-seasonally adjusted terms. Only EA/EU aggregate key indicators are also available seasonally adjusted. Key ratios are derived from non-financial transactions as follows:Gross household saving rate (S.14_S.15): B8G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of households (S.14_S.15): P51G/(B6G+D8rec-D8pay)*100Gross investment rate of non-financial corporations (S.11): P51G/B1G*100Gross profit share of non-financial corporations (S.11): B2G_B3G/B1G*100 With the following transaction codes:B6G - Gross disposable incomeB8G -  Gross savingD8rec / D8pay - the adjustment for the change in pension entitlements (receivable / payable)P51G - Gross fixed capital formationB1G - Gross value addedB2G_B3G - Gross operating surplus/ mixed income. The following seasonally adjusted key indicators are calculated in real terms for European aggregates only: Nominal growth of household adjusted disposable income per capita (percentage change on previous period, S.14_S.15): B7G/(POP_NC)Real growth of household adjusted disposable income per capita (percentage change on previous period, S.14_S.15): B7G/(POP_NC*Price Deflator)Real growth of household actual consumption per capita (percentage change on previous period, S.14_S.15): P4/(POP_NC*Price Deflator) With the following codes (the codes already described above have not been listed): B7G - Gross adjusted gross disposable income (adjusted for social transfers in kind)P4 - Actual final consumption (adjusted for social transfers in kind)POP_NC - Total population national concept (source:Quarterly national accounts, Eurobase domain namq_10_pe)Price deflator - Price index/implicit deflator calculated as CP_MEUR/CLV05_MEUR – both indicators refer to households and NPISH final consumption expenditure (P31_S14_S15) (source: Quarterly national accounts, Eurobase domain namq_10_gdp) In the above, all ratios are expressed in gross terms, i.e. before deduction of consumption of fixed capital. The following key indicators combine non-financial with financial accounts:Household net financial assets ratio (BF90/(B6G+D8net)) With the following codes (the codes already described above have not been listed):BF90 – Financial net worth "rec" means resources, that is transactions that add to the economic value of a given sector. "pay" means "uses", that is transactions that reduce the economic value of a given sector. "liab" refers to the stock of liabilities incurred by a given sector and recorded in the financial balance sheets. See also the sector accounts dedicated website for more information.
    • August 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Quarterly Sector Accounts (QSA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 1995 (Council Regulation 2223/96). The transmission of the QSA data by the Member States follows the Regulation (EC) N° 1161/2005 of the European Parliament and of the Council (QSA regulation). The QSA encompass the non-financial accounts and provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The compilation of QSA is the outcome of a close collaboration by Eurostat and the ECB, in cooperation with the national statistical institutes and national central banks. The ECB and Eurostat are publishing integrated non-financial and financial accounts, including financial balance sheets, for the euro area (the euro area accounts). Eurostat is also publishing the non-financial accounts for the EU. The QSA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and show relations between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 1995 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1, in turn, the following institutional sectors are distinguished: - Non-financial Corporations (S.11) - Financial Corporations (S.12) - General Government (S.13) - Households and Non-profit Institutions Serving Households (S.14 + S.15). The full set of quarterly sector accounts is published for euro area / EU28 aggregates only. However, a subset of quarterly national key indicators is available at dedicated section (see "Quarterly data") as well as in the database (see table "Key indicators") for most of the 17 members of the European Economic Area (EEA) whose GDP is above 1% of the EU28 total. The other EEA members do not have to transmit the quarterly accounts of corporations and households to Eurostat. Non-financial accounts are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasq_nf_tr). The other three tables (only the Euro area) include financial accounts, other flows and balance sheets. QSA data are provided at current prices only. The key indicators (and their components) of households and non-financial corporations as published in the QSA news release are seasonally adjusted. Data are presented in millions of national currency, euro and as percentages.
    • July 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Annual Sector Accounts (ASA) are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 1995 (Council Regulation 2223/96). The transmission of the ASA data by the Member States follows the Regulation (EC) N° 1392/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council (new ESA95 transmission programme). The ASA encompass the non-financial accounts and provide a description of the different stages of the economic process: production, generation of income, distribution of income, redistribution of income, use of income and non-financial accumulation. The ASA record the economic flows of institutional sectors in order to illustrate their economic behaviour and show relations between them. They also provide a list of balancing items that have high analytical value in their own right: value added, operating surplus and mixed income, balance of primary incomes, disposable income, saving, net lending / net borrowing. All of them but net lending / net borrowing, can be expressed in gross or net terms, i.e. with and without consumption of fixed capital that accounts for the use and obsolescence of fixed assets. In terms of institutional sectors, a broad distinction is made between the domestic economy (ESA 1995 classification code S.1) and the rest of the world (S.2). Within S.1 and S.2, in turn, more detailed subsectors are distinguished in "3.2 Classification system". Data are presented in the table "Non-financial transactions" (nasa_nf_tr). The table contains data, as far as they are available, expressed in national currency and millions of euro in current prices. The availability of back data varies according to country. A subset of national key indicators is available in the table "Key indicators" for most of the members of the European Economic Area (EEA), for the euro area and for the EU28. See also the sector accounts dedicated website for more information.
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Key Economic Indicators (KEI) database contains monthly and quarterly statistics (and associated statistical methodological information) for all OECD member countries and for a selection of non-member countries on a wide variety of economic indicators, namely: quarterly national accounts, industrial production, composite leading indicators, business tendency and consumer opinion surveys, retail trade, consumer and producer prices, hourly earnings, employment/unemployment, interest rates, monetary aggregates, exchange rates, international trade and balance of payments.
  • L
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The level of citizens confidence in EU institutions (Council of the European Union, European Parliament and European Commission) is expressed as the share of positive opinions (people who declare that they tend to trust) about the institutions. The indicator is based on the Eurobarometer, a survey which has been conducted twice a year since 1973 to monitor the evolution of public opinion in the Member States. The indicator only displays the results of the autumn survey. Potential replies to the question on the level of confidence include 'tend to trust', 'tend not to trust' and 'don't know' or 'no answer'. Trust is not precisely defined and could leave some room for interpretation to the interviewees.
  • M
    • November 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 January, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Macroeconomic Imbalances Procedure (MIP) is a surveillance mechanism that aims to identify potential macroeconomic risks early on, prevent the emergence of harmful macroeconomic imbalances, and correct the imbalances that are already in place. It is a mechanism for monitoring economic policies and detecting potential harm to the proper functioning of the economy of a Member State, of the Economic and Monetary Union, and of the European Union as a whole. The MIP covers a number of sequential steps, having the  Alert Mechanism Report (AMR), as a starting point. The report is an initial screening device and it consists of Statistical annex, presenting the MIP Scoreboard indicators. The AMR identifies the Member States for which further analysis (in the form of an in-depth review) is deemed necessary in order to decide whether an imbalance in need of policy action exists. The MIP Scoreboard comprises a small number of relevant, practical, simple, measurable and available macroeconomic and macrofinancial indicators. It is used as a tool to facilitate early identification and monitoring of imbalances and consists of headline indicators with defined  indicative thresholds, serving as alert levels. A wider set of auxiliary indicators is used for the economic reading of the scoreboard. It should be emphasised that the scoreboard indicators are not mechanically interpreted. Countries are assessed by looking at the evolution of indicators over time as well as taking into account the most recent developments and outlook. The assessment takes into account a combination of additional relevant information. The table presents the different versions of the Statistical Annexes of the AMR. Each annex covers 10-year time series by Member State with the following cut-off dates:26th October 2015 for the 2016 AMR;1st November 2014 for the 2015 AMR;1st November 2013 for the 2014 AMR;1st November 2012 for the 2013 AMR;30th January 2012 for the 2012 AMR.
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side.nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side.nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income   The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and incomenamq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes
    • November 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BOP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of an economic area during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, primary and secondary income), as well as on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. International investment position presents value of financial assets owned outside the economy and indebtedness of the economy to the rest of the world. BOP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit for current and capital acount, net acquisition of financial assets or net incurrence of liabilities for BOP financial account and international investment position) towards the external world. Out of BOP data, some indicators on international position of the EU and Member States are derived. Indicators on Main Balance of Payments and International Investment Position items as share of GDP are presented as percentage of GDP for given year or quarter and moving average for 3 consecutive years for: Balance, credit and debit flows of current and capital accounts and of main current account  items: goods, services, primary and secondary income,Net flows, net acquisition of financial assets and net incurrence of liabilities for total financial account and foreign direct investment,International investment position and net external debt at the end of reference quarter or year. Indicators on export market shares present shares of each EU Member State in total world exports of goods and services for given year, and 1-year and 5-year percentage changes of these shares, as well as shares in OECD exports and 5-year percentage changes of these shares.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • November 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a geographical region during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services, a component of BoP current account, and data on Foreign Direct Investment, a component of BoP financial account, are used to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Outward Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FATS) measure the commercial presence, as defined by the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), through affiliates in foreign markets. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports.  Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU or in millions of national currency. Balance of Payments data coverage varies according to the collection. Some collections refer only to Euro area or EU countries, while some others' coverage includes also EU partner countries.   Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.    More information on BoP is available for each specific collection: Quarterly BoP, ITS, FDI, Outward FATS, BoP of EU Institutions.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Balance of Payments (BoP) systematically summarizes all economic transactions between the residents and the non-residents of a country or of a geographical region during a given period. The Balance of payments provides harmonized information on international transactions which are part of the current account (goods, services, income, current transfers), but also on transactions which fall in the capital and the financial account. BoP is an important macro-economic indicator used to assess the position of an economy (of credit or debit) towards the external world. Data on International Trade in Services, a component of BoP current account, and data on Foreign Direct Investment, a component of BoP financial account, are used to monitor the external commercial performance of different economies. Outward Foreign Affiliates Statistics (FATS) measure the commercial presence, as defined by the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS), through affiliates in foreign markets. Balance of Payments data are used for calculation of indicators needed for monitoring of macroenomic imbalances such as share of main BoP and International Investment Position (IIP) items in GDP and export market shares calculated as the EU Member States' shares in total world exports.  Out of BoP data, some indicators of EU market integration are also derived. Data are in millions of Euro/ECU or in millions of national currency. Balance of Payments data coverage varies according to the collection. Some collections refer only to Euro area or EU countries, while some others' coverage includes also EU partner countries.   Several statistical adjustments are applied to the original data provided by the Member States. The International Monetary Fund Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5) classification is used for the compilation of the BoP. The BoP data are collected through national surveys and administrative sources.    More information on BoP is available for each specific collection: Quarterly BoP, ITS, FDI, Outward FATS, BoP of EU Institutions.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data are the result of the annual structure of government debt survey and cover the EU countries as well as Norway. The following series are available: Central government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; State government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Local government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Social security funds gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; General government gross debt by initital maturity and sector of debt holder; Debt by currency of issuance; Government guarantees (contingent liabilities); Average remaining maturity of debt; Apparent cost of the debt; Market value of debt.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Economy-wide material flow accounts (EW-MFA) provide an aggregate overview, in thousand tonnes per year, of the material flows into and out of an economy. EW-MFA cover solid, gaseous, and liquid materials, except for bulk flows of water and air. Like the system of national accounts, EW-MFA constitute a multi-purpose information system. The detailed material flows provide a rich empirical database for numerous analytical purposes. Further, EW-MFA are used to derive various material flow indicators.   This metadata refers to the following five datasets based on the EW-MFA data collection: Material flow accounts (env_ac_mfa): this dataset provides detailed material input flows, in thousand tonnes per year, into (domestic extraction and physical imports) and out (physical exports) of an economy according toRegulation (EU) 691/2011.Material flow accounts - domestic processed output (env_ac_mfadpo): this dataset provides detailed material flows, termed 'domestic processed output', from an economy to the environment in thousand tonnes per year.Material flow accounts - balancing items (env_ac_mfabi): this dataset provides balancing items which are required to articulate a consistent material input-output balance of a national economy (in thousand tonnes per year).Material flow accounts - main indicators (env_ac_mfain): this dataset provides highly aggregated EW-MFA and derived indicators: - domestic extraction (DE): DE indicates the total amount of material extracted by resident units from the natural environment for further processing in the economy; - imports (IMP), total and extra-EU: imports of products in their simple mass weight; - exports (EXP), total and extra-EU: exports of products in their simple mass weight; - physical trade balance (PTB): physical imports minus physical exports; - direct material input (DMI): DMI indicates the direct input of material into the economy. DMI includes all materials which are of economic value and which are availble for use in production and consumption activities and it is calculated as the sum of domestic extraction plus physical imports: DMI = DE + IMP; - domestic material consumption (DMC): DMC indicates the total amount of material actually consumed domestically by resident units. DMC of a given country's national economy can be calculated as direct material input minus physical exports: DMC = DMI – EXP; - domestic processed output (DPO): DPO indicates the amounts of solid, liquid and gaseous materials (excluding water and respiratory carbon dioxide) supplied by the national economy and taken up by the natural environment, particularly by the atmosphere; - balancing items (BI): balancing items enable the balancing of material input and output related to a national economy. Two groupings of balancing items are distinguishable: BI to be added to material input, such as oxygen for combustion processes and respiration, and nitrogen; BI to be added to material output, such as water vapour from combustion and gases from respiration. 'Total BI' designates the difference between 'BI: input side' and 'BI: output side', i.e 'BI (input -output)'; - net additions to stock (NAS): NAS is a measure for the ‘physical growth of the economy’. Materials in form of buildings, infrastructures, durable goods such as e.g. cars, industry machinery, or household appliances are added to the economy’s material stock each year (gross additions), and old materials are removed from stock as buildings are demolished, and durable goods disposed of (removals). NAS is approximated using the following equation: NAS = DMC - DPO + BI (input-output).   Resource productivity (env_ac_rp): this dataset provides ratios of gross domestic product (GDP) over domestic material consumption (DMC) in various unit of measure (see also item 4 of metadata). The term 'resource productivity' designates an indicator that reflects the GDP generated per unit of resources used by the economy. This is typically a macro-economic concept that can be presented alongside labour or capital productivity.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Economy-wide material flow accounts (EW-MFA) provide an aggregate overview, in thousand tonnes per year, of the material flows into and out of an economy. EW-MFA cover solid, gaseous, and liquid materials, except for bulk flows of water and air. Like the system of national accounts, EW-MFA constitute a multi-purpose information system. The detailed material flows provide a rich empirical database for numerous analytical purposes. Further, EW-MFA are used to derive various material flow indicators.   This metadata refers to the following five datasets based on the EW-MFA data collection: Material flow accounts (env_ac_mfa): this dataset provides detailed material input flows, in thousand tonnes per year, into (domestic extraction and physical imports) and out (physical exports) of an economy according toRegulation (EU) 691/2011.Material flow accounts - domestic processed output (env_ac_mfadpo): this dataset provides detailed material flows, termed 'domestic processed output', from an economy to the environment in thousand tonnes per year.Material flow accounts - balancing items (env_ac_mfabi): this dataset provides balancing items which are required to articulate a consistent material input-output balance of a national economy (in thousand tonnes per year).Material flow accounts - main indicators (env_ac_mfain): this dataset provides highly aggregated EW-MFA and derived indicators: - domestic extraction (DE): DE indicates the total amount of material extracted by resident units from the natural environment for further processing in the economy; - imports (IMP), total and extra-EU: imports of products in their simple mass weight; - exports (EXP), total and extra-EU: exports of products in their simple mass weight; - physical trade balance (PTB): physical imports minus physical exports; - direct material input (DMI): DMI indicates the direct input of material into the economy. DMI includes all materials which are of economic value and which are availble for use in production and consumption activities and it is calculated as the sum of domestic extraction plus physical imports: DMI = DE + IMP; - domestic material consumption (DMC): DMC indicates the total amount of material actually consumed domestically by resident units. DMC of a given country's national economy can be calculated as direct material input minus physical exports: DMC = DMI – EXP; - domestic processed output (DPO): DPO indicates the amounts of solid, liquid and gaseous materials (excluding water and respiratory carbon dioxide) supplied by the national economy and taken up by the natural environment, particularly by the atmosphere; - balancing items (BI): balancing items enable the balancing of material input and output related to a national economy. Two groupings of balancing items are distinguishable: BI to be added to material input, such as oxygen for combustion processes and respiration, and nitrogen; BI to be added to material output, such as water vapour from combustion and gases from respiration. 'Total BI' designates the difference between 'BI: input side' and 'BI: output side', i.e 'BI (input -output)'; - net additions to stock (NAS): NAS is a measure for the ‘physical growth of the economy’. Materials in form of buildings, infrastructures, durable goods such as e.g. cars, industry machinery, or household appliances are added to the economy’s material stock each year (gross additions), and old materials are removed from stock as buildings are demolished, and durable goods disposed of (removals). NAS is approximated using the following equation: NAS = DMC - DPO + BI (input-output).   Resource productivity (env_ac_rp): this dataset provides ratios of gross domestic product (GDP) over domestic material consumption (DMC) in various unit of measure (see also item 4 of metadata). The term 'resource productivity' designates an indicator that reflects the GDP generated per unit of resources used by the economy. This is typically a macro-economic concept that can be presented alongside labour or capital productivity.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Economy-wide material flow accounts (EW-MFA) provide an aggregate overview, in thousand tonnes per year, of the material flows into and out of an economy. EW-MFA cover solid, gaseous, and liquid materials, except for bulk flows of water and air. Like the system of national accounts, EW-MFA constitute a multi-purpose information system. The detailed material flows provide a rich empirical database for numerous analytical purposes. Further, EW-MFA are used to derive various material flow indicators.   This metadata refers to the following five datasets based on the EW-MFA data collection:Material flow accounts (env_ac_mfa): this dataset provides detailed material input flows, in thousand tonnes per year, into (domestic extraction and physical imports) and out (physical exports) of an economy according toRegulation (EU) 691/2011.  Material flow accounts - domestic processed output (env_ac_mfadpo): this dataset provides detailed material flows, termed 'domestic processed output', from an economy to the environment in thousand tonnes per year.  Material flow accounts - balancing items (env_ac_mfabi): this dataset provides balancing items which are required to articulate a consistent material input-output balance of a national economy (in thousand tonnes per year).  Material flow accounts - main indicators (env_ac_mfain): this dataset provides highly aggregated EW-MFA and derived indicators: - domestic extraction (DE): DE indicates the total amount of material extracted by resident units from the natural environment for further processing in the economy; - imports (IMP), total and extra-EU: imports of products in their simple mass weight; - exports (EXP), total and extra-EU: exports of products in their simple mass weight; - physical trade balance (PTB): physical imports minus physical exports; - direct material input (DMI): DMI indicates the direct input of material into the economy. DMI includes all materials which are of economic value and which are availble for use in production and consumption activities and it is calculated as the sum of domestic extraction plus physical imports: DMI = DE + IMP; - domestic material consumption (DMC): DMC indicates the total amount of material actually consumed domestically by resident units. DMC of a given country's national economy can be calculated as direct material input minus physical exports: DMC = DMI – EXP; - domestic processed output (DPO): DPO indicates the amounts of solid, liquid and gaseous materials (excluding water and respiratory carbon dioxide) supplied by the national economy and taken up by the natural environment, particularly by the atmosphere; - balancing items (BI): balancing items enable the balancing of material input and output related to a national economy. Two groupings of balancing items are distinguishable: BI to be added to material input, such as oxygen for combustion processes and respiration, and nitrogen; BI to be added to material output, such as water vapour from combustion and gases from respiration. 'Total BI' designates the difference between 'BI: input side' and 'BI: output side', i.e 'BI (input -output)'; - net additions to stock (NAS): NAS is a measure for the ‘physical growth of the economy’. Materials in form of buildings, infrastructures, durable goods such as e.g. cars, industry machinery, or household appliances are added to the economy’s material stock each year (gross additions), and old materials are removed from stock as buildings are demolished, and durable goods disposed of (removals). NAS is approximated using the following equation: NAS = DMC - DPO + BI (input-output).  Resource productivity (env_ac_rp): this dataset provides ratios of gross domestic product (GDP) over domestic material consumption (DMC) in various unit of measure (see also item 4 of metadata). The term 'resource productivity' designates an indicator that reflects the GDP generated per unit of resources used by the economy. This is typically a macro-economic concept that can be presented alongside labour or capital productivity.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The datasets:Material flow accounts in raw material equivalents - modelling estimates (env_ac_rme)Material flow accounts in raw material equivalents by final uses of products - modelling estimates (env_ac_rmefd) provide model-based estimates, for the aggregate EU economy only, of material flow accounts in raw material equivelents (MFA-RME) to complement the dataset ´Material flow accounts' (env_ac_mfa), also referred to as economy-wide material flow accounts (EW-MFA). Both EW-MFA and MFA-RME present the flows of natural resources (minerals, metal ores, biomass, fossil energy materials) from the environment into the economy. Both include domestic extraction of materials measured in tonnes of gross material (e.g. gross ore or gross harvest). However, in EW-MFA imports and exports are measured in mass weight of the products as they cross country borders. For the derived indicators this implies that they combine data with different underlying measurement concepts. The MFA-RME dataset offers a complementary view by replacing the material trade flows in mass weight by estimates of the raw material equivalents of the products traded, i.e. how much extraction, domestic and abroad, was needed to produce the traded products. And by extension, the indicator raw material consumption (RMC) shows the amount of extraction required to produce the products demanded by final users in the EU-28, irrespective of where in the world the extraction of material from the environment took place.  The MFA-RME dataset (env_ac_rme) includes:domestic material extraction by material, directly taken from the EW-MFA dataset (env_ac_mfa), see also Section 15.3 and 17.2 below,estimates of the imports and exports in raw material equivalents (RME) by materialderived indicators, namely raw material input (RMI) and raw material consumption (RMC), by material, see also Section 3.2 below.   The MFA-RME dataset by final uses of products (env_ac_rmefd) presents RMC in more detail by:materialfinal productsfinal uses (representing subcategories of RMC) The two MFA-RME datasets are compiled using the same model and are fully consistent.    For more information on the complete set of material flow accounts see also the dedicated website on material flows and resource productivity.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • March 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • March 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2014 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data. The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for countries (where applicable) and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnings Survey (SES) is a 4-yearly survey which provides EU-wide harmonised structural data on gross earnings, hours paid and annual days of paid holiday leave, which are collected every four years under Council Regulation (EC) No 530/1999 concerning structural statistics on earnings and on labour costs, and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1738/2005 amending Regulation (EC) No 1916/2000 as regards the definition and transmission of information on the structure of earnings. The objective of this legislation is so that National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) provide accurate and harmonised data on earnings in EU Member States and other countries for policy-making and research purposes. The SES 2010 provides detailed and comparable information on relationships between the level of hourly, monthly and annual remuneration, personal characteristics of employees (sex, age, occupation, length of service, highest educational level attained, etc.) and their employer (economic activity, size and economic control of the enterprise). Regional data is also available for some countries and regional metadata is identical to that provided for national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Structure of Earnigns Survey is a 4-yearly survey conducted by the National Statistical Institutes (NSI). The tables published present data on number of employees, mean hourly earnings and hourly overtime pay, mean monthly earnings and overtime & shift pay, mean annual earnings and total annual bonuses, mean monthly hours paid and mean annual holidays. Details of available indicators and tables can be found under Annexes Tables 2002 at the bottom of this page. Regional metadata is identical to metadata provided for the national data.
    • August 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema