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Austria

  • President:Dr. Alexander Van der Bellen
  • Chancellor:Brigitte Bierlein
  • Capital city:Vienna
  • Languages:German (official nationwide) 88.6%, Turkish 2.3%, Serbian 2.2%, Croatian (official in Burgenland) 1.6%, other (includes Slovene, official in South Carinthia, and Hungarian, official in Burgenland) 5.3% (2001 est.)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:8,847,037 (2018)
  • Area, sq km:82,523
  • GDP per capita, US$:51,513 (2018)
  • GDP, billion current US$:455.7 (2018)
  • GINI index:No data
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:26

PPP

All datasets:  2 E M N P Q
  • 2
    • August 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Sandeep Reddy
      Accessed On: 12 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This dataset contains the main results of the 2014 Eurostat-OECD PPP comparison for the 47 countries that participated in the 2014 round of the Eurostat-OECD Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) Programme. The dataset is organised in 23 tables which show results both in US dollars and OECD as reference (Table 1.1 to Table 1.12) and in euros and European Union as reference (Table 2.1 to Table 2.11) calculated with the EKS method. The tables contain the following information: Table 1.1 to 1.12 The dollar serves as numeraire and the OECD as reference country (except for Table 1.12 where the United States are the reference country). Table 1.1 and Table 1.2 present the data on which the following ten tables are based. • Table 1.1 gives nominal expenditure in national currency of the participating countries. • Table 1.2 presents PPPs (OECD=1.00) that have been calculated for the participating countries using the price and expenditure data collected during the 2014 round. The PPPs were obtained by the EKS method of calculation and aggregation. • Table 1.3 shows nominal expenditure of Table 1.1 converted to US dollars. Exchange rates do not reflect the relative purchasing power of different currencies and the converted expenditure is still expressed at national prices. As such, it remains nominal measures, the spatial equivalent of a time series of GDP for a single country at current prices. Hence, they are called “nominal expenditure”. The nominal expenditure in the table reflects both differences in the quantities of goods and services purchased in the countries and differences in the price levels of the countries. • Table 1.4 gives nominal expenditure of Table 1.3 expressed on a per capita basis using the midyear population data. • Table 1.5 and Table 1.6 present the nominal expenditure from Table 1.3 and the nominal expenditure per head from Table 1.4 as indices with OECD=100. • Table 1.7 shows real expenditure converted to US dollar using the PPPs from Table 1.2. PPPs equalise the purchasing power of different currencies during the process of conversion and the converted expenditures are expressed at international prices (that is at the same price level). As such, they are real measures, the spatial equivalent of a time series of GDP for a single country at constant prices. Hence, they are called “real expenditures”. The real final expenditures in the table reflect only differences in the volumes of goods and services purchased in the countries. • Table 1.8 gives the real expenditure of Table 1.7 expressed on a per capita basis using the midyear population data. Again, the real expenditures per head in this table are not additive nor are they subject to the Gerschenkron effect. • Table 1.9 and Table 1.10 present the real expenditure on GDP from Table 1.7 and the real final expenditure per head on GDP from Table 1.8 as indices with OECD=100. • Table 1.11 gives the price levels which are computed as ratios of the PPPs in Table 1.2 to the exchange rates and are expressed as indices with OECD=100. For a given aggregate, they indicate the number of units of the common currency needed to buy the same volume of the  aggregate in each country. Price levels that exceed 100 indicate that the level of prices in that country and for that analytical category is higher than the average price level for the OECD. • Table 1.12 present PPPs as in Table 1.2 (see description above) but with the United States as reference country (US=1.00). Table 2.1 to 2.11 The euro serves as numeraire and the European Union as reference country. Table 2.1 and Table 2.2 present the data on which the following nine tables are based. Table 2.1 to 2.11 contain the same information as Table 1.1 to 1.11 with a different basis. For explanation on the contents, please see description above.
  • E
  • M
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This dataset contains monthly Comparative Price Levels (CPL) for OECD countries. CPLs are defined as the ratios of PPPs for private final consumption expenditure to exchange rates. They provide measures of differences in price levels between countries. The monthly PPPs used to derive the table are OECD estimates. The table is to be read vertically. Each column shows the number of specified monetary units needed in each of the countries listed to buy the same representative basket of consumer goods and services. In each case the representative basket costs a hundred units in the country whose currency is specified. Let’s take an example. If you are a Canadian citizen and you want to know the price level in Canada when compared to other countries, you have to look at the column Canada, where the price level is set at 100 for the whole column. If you have 120 for Finland, it means that the price level in Finland is 20% higher than in Canada. It means that you would spend 120 dollars in Finland to buy the same basket of goods and services when you spend 100 in Canada.
  • N
  • P
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Purchasing power parities (PPPs) are indicators of price level differences across countries. PPPs tell us how many currency units a given quantity of goods and services costs in different countries. PPPs can thus be used as currency conversion rates to convert expenditures expressed in national currencies into an artificial common currency (the Purchasing Power Standard, PPS), eliminating the effect of price level differences across countries. The main use of PPPs is to convert national accounts aggregates, like the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of different countries, into comparable volume aggregates. Applying nominal exchange rates in this process would overestimate the GDP of countries with high price levels relative to countries with low price levels. The use of PPPs ensures that the GDP of all countries is valued at a uniform price level and thus reflects only differences in the actual volume of the economy. PPPs are also applied in analyses of relative price levels across countries. For this purpose, the PPPs are divided by the current nominal exchange rate to obtain a price level index (PLI) which expresses the price level of a given country relative to another, or relative to a group of countries like the EU Member States. The production of PPPs is a multilateral exercise involving the National Statistical Institutes of the participating countries, Eurostat and the OECD. Indicators in Eurostat's dissemination database The indicators published in the price domain on Eurostat's website are the following: Purchasing power parities (PPPs) scaled to the sum of expenditures of the EU Member States expressed in euro. This means that the PPP of one particular country indicates how many units of national currency one would need in that country in order to maintain the purchasing power of one euro in the EUPrice level indices (PLIs) as defined aboveNominal expenditure in national currency, as extracted from each country's national accountsNominal expenditure as percentage of GDPNominal expenditure in euroNominal expenditure per inhabitant in euroReal expenditure, defined as nominal expenditure divided by the PPPReal expenditure per inhabitantVolume indices of real expenditure per inhabitantThe convergence indicators, defined as the coefficient of variation of the price level indices (PLIs) and per capita volume indices (VIs) of gross domestic product (GDP), actual individual consumption (AIC) and household final consumption expenditure (HFCE). It measures the price and volume convergence across countries. In addition, PPPs and real expenditures are available from the national accounts domain of the database. For further details, cf. 17.1.
    • March 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This dataset contains Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs) for all OECD countries. PPPs are the rates of currency conversion that eliminate the differences in price levels between countries. Per capita volume indices based on PPP converted data reflect only differences in the volume of goods and services produced. Comparative price levels are defined as the ratios of PPPs to exchange rates. They provide measures of the differences in price levels between countries. The PPPs are given in national currency units per US dollar. The price levels and volume indices derived using these PPPs have been rebased on the OECD average. Per capita volume indices should not be used to rank countries as PPPs are statistical constructs rather than precise measures. Minor differences between countries should be interpreted with caution.
  • Q
    • September 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The OECD's quarterly national accounts (QNA) dataset presents data collected from all the OECD member countries and some other major economies on the basis of a standardised questionnaire as well as countries' own definitions and classifications. It contains a wide selection of generally seasonally adjusted quarterly series most widely used for economic analysis from 1960 or whenever available: - GDP expenditure and output approaches (current prices and volume estimates); - GDP income approach (current prices); - Gross fixed capital formation (current prices and volume estimates) broken down separately by type of asset or product and by institutional sector; - Disposable income and Real disposable income components; - Saving and net lending (current prices); - Population and Employment (in persons); - Employment by industry (in persons and hours worked); - Compensation of employees (current prices); - Household final consumption expenditure by durability (current prices and volume estimates). The main purpose of this dataset is to provide relevant, reliable, consistent, comparable and timely quarterly national accounts for OECD member countries, some non-member countries and some area totals for analytical purposes. All the OECD member countries compile their accounts according to the 2008 SNA. The non-member countries which are still producing national accounts according to the 1993 SNA will switch to the new 2008 SNA over the coming months/years. This will allow the improvement of cross-countries comparability.

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