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Bulgaria

  • President:Rumen Radev
  • Prime Minister:Boyko Borisov
  • Capital city:Sofia
  • Languages:Bulgarian (official) 76.8%, Turkish 8.2%, Roma 3.8%, other 0.7%, unspecified 10.5% (2011 est.)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:7,075,991 (2017)
  • Area, sq km:108,560 (2017)
  • GDP per capita, US$:8,032 (2017)
  • GDP, billion current US$:56.8 (2017)
  • GINI index:37.4 (2014)
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:50 (2017)
All datasets:  3 B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T W
  • 3
    • October 2016
      Source: Philipps-University of Marburg, Empirical Institutional Economics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2016
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      The 3P Anti-trafficking Policy Index evaluates governmental anti-trafficking efforts in the three main policy dimensions (3Ps), based on the requirements prescribed by the United Nations Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (2000).   The three main policy dimensions (3Ps) are:Prosecution of perpetrators of human traffickingPrevention of human traffickingProtection of the victims of human trafficking Each of the 3P areas is evaluated on a 5-point scale and each index is aggregated to the overall 3P Anti-trafficking Index as the  sum (score 3-15).Prosecution Index Score: 1 (no compliance) - 5 (full compliance)Prevention Index Score: 1 (no compliance) - 5 (full compliance)Protection Index Score: 1 (no compliance) - 5 (full compliance)3P Anti-trafficking Policy Index Score: 3 (no compliance for any of the three areas) - 15 (full compliance for all of the three areas) The 3P Anti-trafficking Policy Index is available for each country and each year and currently includes up to 189 countries for the preiod from 2000 to 2015.
  • B
    • April 2017
      Source: Bloom Consulting
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 May, 2017
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      Bloom Consulting was founded in 2003 as a Nation Branding consultancy. Our Headquarters are located in Madrid, with offices in Lisbon and São Paulo. Bloom Consulting has been interviewed by The Economist, Forbes and CNN . According to Country Branding Central www.countrybrandingwiki.org, our CEO José Filipe Torres, a recurrent lecturer in Universities such as Harvard, is considered one of the top 3 international experts in the field of Nation Branding, Region and City Branding, providing advisory for the OECD. In addition, Bloom Consulting publishes the Bloom Consulting Country Brand Ranking © annually for both Trade and Tourism, to extensively analyze the brand performance of 193 countries and territories worldwide and the Digital Country Index - Measuring the Brand appeal of countries and territories in the Digital World.
  • C
    • December 2016
      Source: Concordia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2017
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      THE CONCORDIA PARTNERSHIP Index (the Index) was developed as a tool for public, private, and nonprofit organizations to identify opportunities to form strategic partnerships and pool resources for the implementation of innovative ideas. The Index ranks countries based on their readiness and need to engage in public-private partnerships (P3s). The inclu- sion of the need indicators sets the Index apart from other indices that measure P3 environ- ments. While the success of a P3 depends on a country’s political and market structures, the Index recognizes that for a P3 to be truly impactful it must address a large-scale need.
    • January 2019
      Source: Transparency International
      Uploaded by: Pallavi S
      Accessed On: 01 February, 2019
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      Data cited at CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX 2018 by Transparency International is licensed under CC-BY-ND 4.0. Global Corruption Barometer is the largest world-wide public opinion survey on corruption. see more at https://www.transparency.org/cpi2018 Transparency International(TI) defines corruption as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. This definition encompasses corrupt practices in both the public and private sectors. The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranks countries according to the perception of corruption in the public sector. The CPI is an aggregate indicator that combines different sources of information about corruption, making it possible to compare countries. The CPI ranks almost 200 countries by their perceived levels of corruption, as determined by expert assessments and opinion surveys.
    • March 2019
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 March, 2019
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      Source: UNECE Statistical Database, compiled from national and international official sources. Area data exclude overseas departments and territories. For population footnotes click here. For life expectancy footnotes click here. For fertility rate footnotes click here. For population by marital status footnotes click here. For female members of parliament footnotes click here. For female government ministers footnotes click here. For female central bank board members footnotes click here. For female tertiary students footnotes click here. For economic activity rate footnotes click here. For gender pay gap footnotes click here. For employment growth rate footnotes click here. For unemployment rate footnotes click here. For youth unemployment rate footnotes click here. For employment by economic sector footnotes click here. For economic indicator footnotes click here. For road accident footnotes click here. For total length of motorways footnotes click here. For total length of railway lines footnotes click here. Key indicators in maps .. - data not availableIndicatorGDP in agriculture (ISIC4 A): output approach, index, 2010=100If the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP in industry (incl. construction) (ISIC4 B-F): output approach, index, 2010=100If the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP in services (ISIC4 G-U): output approach, index, 2010=100If the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in agriculture etc. (ISIC4 A), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in industry etc. (ISIC4 B-E), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in construction (ISIC4 F), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in trade, hospitality, transport and communication (ISIC4 G-J), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in finance and business services (ISIC4 K-N), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in public administration, education and health (ISIC4 O-Q), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.GDP: in other service activities (ISIC4 R-U), output approach, per cent share of GVAIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in agriculture, hunting, forestry and fishing (ISIC Rev. 4 A), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in industry and energy (ISIC Rev. 4 B-E), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in construction (ISIC Rev. 4 F), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in trade, hotels, restaurants, transport and communications (ISIC Rev. 4 G-J), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in finance, real estate and business services (ISIC Rev. 4 K-N), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in public administration, education and health (ISIC Rev. 4 O-Q), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.Employment in other service activities (ISIC Rev. 4 R-U), share of total employmentIf the country has not yet provided data according to ISIC 4, you may find the data according to ISIC 3.1 in more detailed tables under the Economy section of the database.
    • January 2019
      Source: Numbeo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 February, 2019
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      Data cited at: Numbeo Crime Index is an estimation of overall level of crime in a given city or a country. We consider crime levels lower than 20 as very low, crime levels between 20 and 40 as being low, crime levels between 40 and 60 as being moderate, crime levels between 60 and 80 as being high and finally crime levels higher than 80 as being very high. Safety index is, on the other way, quite opposite of crime index. If the city has a high safety index, it is considered very safe.  
  • D
    • May 2007
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2015
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      The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) is the only index that includes price data for 181 economies, which is vital in assessing effective market demand. The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) has been designed to as a tool for tracking progress in bridging the digital divide and the implementa- tion of the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS). As such, it provides a powerful policy tool for exploring the global and regional trends in infrastructure, opportu- nity and usage that are shaping the Information Society.
  • E
    • September 2018
      Source: Fraser Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 November, 2018
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      Data cited at: "Economic Freedom of the World: 2018 Annual Report"@Fraser Institute   The economic freedom index measures the degree of economic freedom present in five major areas: [1] Size of Government; [2] Legal System and Security of Property Rights; [3] Sound Money; [4] Freedom to Trade Internationally; [5] Regulation. Within the five major areas, there are 24 components (area) in economic freedom index. Each component and sub-component is placed on a scale from 0 to 10.
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Misha Gusev
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      Calculated using Mean Years of Schooling and Expected Years of Schooling.
    • July 2018
      Source: InterNations
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 November, 2018
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      In 2018, Expat Insider, one of the world’s largest and most comprehensive surveys on life abroad, achieved a major milestone for its fifth anniversary: the number of respondents reached a new record high. In total, 18,135 expats from across the globe took part in the survey. They represent 178 nationalities and are living in 187 countries or territories, from over 1,600 participants in Germany to one each in Greenland and Equatorial Guinea, providing a unique insight into life abroad in 2018.
  • F
    • May 2018
      Source: Fund for Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 May, 2018
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      The FSI focuses on the indicators of risk and is based on thousands of articles and reports that are processed by our CAST Software from electronically available sources. Measures of fragility, like Demographic Pressures,Refugees and IDPs and etc., have been scaled on 0 to 10 where 10 is highest fragility and 0 no fragility.
  • G
    • March 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 March, 2019
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      The GID-DB is a database providing researchers and policymakers with key data on gender-based discrimination in social institutions. This data helps analyse women’s economic empowerment and understand gender gaps in other key areas of development. Covering 160 countries, the GID-DB contains comprehensive information on legal, cultural and traditional practices that discriminate against women and girls.
    • October 2015
      Source: HelpAge International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2015
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      The aim of the Index is both to capture the multidimensional nature of the quality of life and wellbeing of older people, and to provide a means by which to measure performance and promote improvements. We have chosen 13 different indicators for the four key domains of Income security, Health status, Capability, and Enabling environment. Domain 1: Income security The income security domain assesses people's access to a sufficient amount of income, and the capacity to use it independently, in order to meet basic needs in older age. Domain 2: Health status The three indicators used for the health domain provide information about physical and psychological wellbeing. Domain 3: Capability The employment and education indicators in this domain look at different aspects of the empowerment of older people. Domain 4: Enabling environment This domain uses data from Gallup World View to assess older people's perception of social connectedness, safety, civic freedom and access to public transport - issues older people have singled out as particularly important.
    • November 2016
      Source: DHL
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2016
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      DHL released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI), a detailed analysis of the state of globalization around the world. The latest report, authored by internationally acclaimed globalization expert Professor Pankaj Ghemawat together with Steven A. Altman, shows that global connectedness, measured by cross-border flows of trade, capital, information and people, has recovered most of its losses incurred during the financial crisis. Especially the depth of international interactions – the proportion of interactions that cross national borders – gained momentum in 2013 after its recovery had stalled in the previous year. Nonetheless, trade depth, as a distinct dimension of globalization, continues to stagnate and the overall level of global connectedness remains quite limited, implying that there could be gains of trillions of US dollars if boosted in future years.
    • July 2017
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 13 September, 2017
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        The Global Cybersecurity Index (GCI) is a survey that measures the commitment of Member States to cybersecurity in order to raise awareness. The GCI revolves around the ITU Global Cybersecurity Agenda (GCA) and its five pillars (legal, technical, organizational, capacity building and cooperation). For each of these pillars, questions were developed to assess commitment. Through consultation with a group of experts, these questions were weighted in order to arrive at an overall GCI score. The survey was administered through an online platform through which supporting evidence was also collected. One-hundred and thirty-four Member States responded to the survey throughout 2016. Member States who did not respond were invited to validate responses determined from open-source research. As such, the GCI results reported herein cover all 193 ITU Member States. The 2017 publication of the GCI continues to show the commitment to cybersecurity of countries around the world. The overall picture shows improvement and strengthening of all five elements of the cybersecurity agenda in various countries in all regions. However, there is space for further improvement in cooperation at all levels, capacity building and organizational measures. As well, the gap in the level of cybersecurity engagement between different regions is still present and visible. The level of development of the different pillars varies from country to country in the regions, and while commitment in Europe remains very high in the legal and technical fields in particular, the challenging situation in the Africa and Americas regions shows the need for continued engagement and support. In addition to providing the GCI score, this report also provides a set of illustrative practices that give insight into the achievements of certain countries.
    • February 2017
      Source: Global Democracy Ranking
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2017
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      The Democracy Ranking 2016 compares the development of quality of democracy in 112 countries during the years 2011-2012 with 2014-2015. It is based on the following dimensions: politics (weighted with 50%), economy (10%), ecology and environment (10%), gender equality (10%), health and health status (10%), and knowledge (10%). The possible values that a country can achieve go from 1 (minimum) to 100 (maximum) (the entire scale is thus 1-100). Rank change: + sign shows improvement in rank and - sign shows deterioration in rank
    • March 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 April, 2017
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic: Global Energy Architecture Performance Index Report 2017 Publication URL: https://www.weforum.org/reports/global-energy-architecture-performance-index-report-2017 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode   The Energy Architecture Performance Index (EAPI) uses a set of indicators to highlight the performance of various countries across each facet of their energy architecture, determining to what extent nations have been able to create affordable, sustainable and secure energy systems   1)Economic growth and development: The extent to which energy architecture supports, rather than detracts from, economic growth and development 2) Environmental sustainability: The extent to which energy architecture has been constructed to minimize negative environmental externalities 3) Energy access and security: The extent to which energy architecture is at risk of an energy security impact, and whether adequate access to energy is provided to all parts of the population   Note: For detail methodology please visit:"http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GlobalEnergyArchitecturePerformance_Index_2017.pdf"
    • December 2018
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 March, 2019
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      The GEM Adult Population Survey (APS) measures the level and nature of entrepreneurial activity around the world. It is administered to a representative national sample of at least 2000 respondents. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.
    • April 2018
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 April, 2018
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      The GEM National Expert Survey (NES) monitors the factors that are believed to have a significant impact on entrepreneurship, known as the Entrepreneurial Framework Conditions (EFCs). It is administered to a minimum of 36 carefully chosen 'experts' in each country. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.
    • December 2018
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2019
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic:  The Global Gender Gap Report 2018 Publication URL: https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-global-gender-gap-report-2018 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode   Gender parity is fundamental to whether and how economies and societies thrive. Ensuring the full development and appropriate deployment of half of the world’s total talent pool has a vast bearing on the growth, competitiveness and future-readiness of economies and businesses worldwide. The Global Gender Gap Report benchmarks 149 countries on their progress towards gender parity across four thematic dimensions: Economic Participation and Opportunity, Educational Attainment, Health and Survival, and Political Empowerment. In addition, this year’s edition studies skills gender gaps related to Artificial Intelligence (AI)
    • September 2018
      Source: Dual Citizen LLC
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2018
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      The performance index of the 2018 GGEI is defined by 20 underlying indicators, each contained within one of the four main dimensions of leadership & climate change, efficiency sectors, markets & investment and the environment.   For more detail on our approach to aggregating these diverse data sources to define the composite indicators in the GGEI and its four main dimensions, as well as our approach to data selection, weighting and other issues associated with creating an index, please visit the Methodology section.
    • October 2018
      Source: International Food Policy Research Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 October, 2018
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      Global Hunger Index, 2018   The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is a tool designed to comprehensively measure and track hunger globally, regionally, and by country. Each year, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) calculates GHI scores in order to assess progress, or the lack thereof, in decreasing hunger. The GHI is designed to raise awareness and understanding of regional and country differences in the struggle against hunger. Since 2015, GHI scores have been calculated using a revised and improved formula. The revision replaces child underweight, previously the sole indicator of child under-nutrition, with two indicators of child under-nutrition—child wasting and child stunting—which are equally weighted in the GHI calculation. The revised formula also standardizes each of the component indicators to balance their contribution to the overall index and to changes in the GHI scores over time. GHI scores are calculated using a three-step process that draws on available data from various sources to capture the multidimensional nature of hunger: 1. Undernourishment: The share of the population that is undernourished (that is, whose caloric intake is insufficient). 2. Child wasting and stunting: The share of children under the age of five who are wasted (that is, who have low weight for their height, reflecting acute under-nutrition). 3.Child Stunting: The share of children under the age of five who are stunted (that is, who have low height for their age, reflecting chronic under-nutrition). 4. Child Mortality: The mortality rate of children under the age of five (in part, a reflection of the fatal mix of inadequate nutrition and unhealthy environments).   Note: Values for the years are taken as per below table.1Global Hunger Index Scores2Proportion of Undernourished in the Population (%)3Prevalence of Wasting in Children Under Five Years(%)4Prevalence of Stunting in Children Under Five Years (%)5Prevalence of underweight in children under five years (%)   Date for above indicators are taken as per below year ranges. 1   2   3   4   5   Date Range Date Range Date Range Date Range Date Range 2018 2013-2017 2018 2015-2017 2018 2013-2017 2018 2013-2017 2012 2009-2013 2017 2012-2016 2017 2014-2016 2017 2012-2016 2017 2012-2016 2011 2008-2012 2015 2010-2016 2015 2014-2016 2015 2012-2016 2015 2012-2016 2010 2005-2010 2014 2009-2013 2013 2014-2016 2013 2010-2014 2013 2010-2014 2009 2004-2009 2013 2008-2012 2012 2011-2013 2010 2008-2012 2010 2008-2012 2008 2003-2008 2012 2005-2010 2011 2010-2012 2008 2006-2010 2008 2006-2010 2007 2002-2007 2011 2004-2009 2010 2009-2011 2005 2003-2007 2005 2003-2007 2006 2001-2006 2010 2008-2012 2009 2005-2007 2000 1998-2002 2000 1998-2002 2005 2003-2007 2009 2002-2007 2008 2007-2009 1995 1993-1997 1995 1993-1997 2004 2000-2005 2008 2006-2010 2007 2003-2005 1992 1990-1994 1992 1990-1994 2003 1999-2003 2005 2003-2007 2006 2002-2004 1990 1988-1992 1990 1988-1992 2000 1998-2002 2001 1994-1998 2005 2004-2006         1997 1993-1998 2000 1998-2002 2004 2001-2003         1995 1993-1997 1996 1988-1992 2003 2000-2002         1990 1988-1992 1995 1993-1997 2000 1999-2001         1980 1977-1982 1992 1990-1994 1997 1995-1997             1990 1988-1992 1995 1994-1996                 1992 1991-1993                 1990 1990-1992                 1980 1979-1981               6. "Under-five Mortality  Rate(%)" year range has not been specified in source. GHI Severity Scale ≤ 9.9 low 10.0–19.9 moderate 20.0–34.9 serious 35.0–49.9 alarming 50.0 ≤ extremely alarming
    • July 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 January, 2017
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic: The Global Information Technology Report 2016 Publication URL: https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-global-information-technology-report-2016 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode   This Dataset contains proprietary and non-proprietary data used in the computation of the World Economic's Forum Networked Readiness Index. By making this data available, the Forum aims to inform multi-stakeholder dialogue, foster evidence-based, data-driven decisions, allow measuring progress, and support research by academia, journalists and others.
    • December 2018
      Source: Knowledge4All
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: Knowledge4All,United Nations Development Programme & Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation. The GKI is a partnership initiative between the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation (MBRF), it was first announced during the Knowledge Summit in 2016. The Global Knowledge Index (GKI) is the index that measures knowledge on the global level, it highlights the strategic role of knowledge and the importance of developing objective and scientific tools to measure and evaluate it. The GKI aims at measuring knowledge as a broad concept that is intricately related to all aspects of modern human life, in a systematic approach that builds on solid conceptual and methodological principles. The Global Knowledge Index (GKI) is the only index that measures knowledge on the global level, it highlights the strategic role of knowledge and the importance of developing objective and scientific tools to measure and evaluate it. The GKI aims at measuring knowledge as a broad concept that is intricately related to all aspects of modern human life, in a systematic approach that builds on solid conceptual and methodological principles. The GKI is composed of six sectoral indices: 1) Pre - university education 2) Technical vocational education and training(TVET) 3) Higher education 4) Research, development and innovation(RDI) 5) Information and communications technology (ICT) 6) Economy in addition to a seventh supporting index on the General Enabling Environment. All values are normalized to a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).
    • June 2018
      Source: Open Knowledge International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 June, 2018
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    • January 2019
      Source: Milken Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 February, 2019
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      he Global Opportunity Index answers a pressing need for information that's vital to a thriving global economy like what policies can governments pursue to attract foreign direct investment (FDI), expand their economies, and accelerate job creation, what do multinational companies, other investors, and development agencies need to know before making large-scale, long-term capital commitments.   Methodology:  The GOI considers economic and financial factors that influence investment activities as well as key business, legal and regulatory policies that governments can modify to support and often drive investments. Overall, the GOI tracks countries’ performance on 51 variables aggregated in five categories, each measuring an aspect of the country’s attractiveness for investors.   The assigned composite index value is the average score of the five categories (called component scores). Each variable is normalized from 0 to 10. Within each category, the normalized variables are given equal weight and aggregated, resulting in a normalized category score between 0, indicating the least favorable conditions for investment, and 10, signaling the most favorable. The index covers 133 countries. The index methodology is reviewed for each publication to reflect changes in data sources or other relevant adjustments.
    • March 2018
      Source: A. T. Kearney
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 April, 2018
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      The Global Retail Development Index™ is an annual study that ranks the top 30 developing countries for retail expansion worldwide. The Index analyzes 25 macroeconomic and retail-specific variables to help retailers devise successful global strategies and to identify developing market investment opportunities. The GRDI is unique because it identifies today's most successful markets and those that offer the most potential for the future.
    • March 2019
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 March, 2019
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      Source: UNECE Statistical Database, compiled from national and international (CIS, EUROSTAT, IMF, OECD, World Bank) official sources. Indicators that base on OECD Handbook on Economic Globalisation Indicators are indicated (OECD). General note: The UNECE secretariat presents time series ready for immediate analysis. When appropriate, source segments with methodological differences have been linked and rescaled to build long consistent time series. The national accounts estimates are compiled according to 2008 SNA (System of National Accounts 2008) – e.g. EU member countries, United States, Canada, Ukraine - or 1993 SNA (System of National Accounts 1993). Growth rates (per cent) are over the preceding period, unless otherwise specified. .. - data not available Indicator: Domestic final demand met by total imports, % Indicator measures the share of total domestic final demand (the difference between GDP and net exports) met by imports. Sometimes it is referred to as an import penetration rate. It should be noted that small economies or those rich in mineral resources may be specialized in their production, and so import higher proportions of other goods. In addition, the size of service sector is likely to affect this relationship. [ ( imports / ( final consumption expenditure + gross capital formation ) ) * 100 ] Indicator: Export performance, percentage points Export performance measures the difference between the annual growth rate of exports of a country and the growth rate of imports to the country from the rest of the world. A result above zero level indicates a faster growth of exports compared to the growth of imports during the reference period. [ ( exports (t) / exports (t-1) ) – ( imports (t) / imports (t-1) ) * 100 ] Indicator: Export performance, value in millions of US $, in constant prices of comon base year Export performance measures the difference between the annual growth of exports of a country and the growth of imports to the country from the rest of the world. A result indicates a relation of growth of exports compared to the growth of imports during the reference period in millions of US dollars. [ ( ( exports (t) - exports (t-1) ) – ( ( imports (t) - imports (t-1) ) ) ] Indicator: Growth rate of exports, % Growth rate of exports is an indicator of the annual growth or decline of exports from the previous year. [ ( exports (t) / exports (t-1) ) * 100 ] Indicator: Growth rate of imports, % Growth rate of imports is an indicator of the annual growth or decline of imports from the previous year. [ ( imports (t) / imports (t-1) ) * 100 ] Indicator: Growth rate of total trade, % Growth rate of total trade describes either annual growth or decline of the volume of international trade from the previous year. [ ( exports + imports ) (t) / ( exports + imports ) (t-1) ) * 100 ] Indicator: Import coverage by exports, % Indicator shows whether or not a country’s imports are fully covered for by exports. The results describe how many per cent of imports are covered by exports. [ ( exports / imports ) * 100 ] Indicator: Total exports to GDP, % Total exports in GDP show the dependence of domestic producers on foreign markets. It may provide a better indicator of vulnerability to some types of external shocks than total trade in GDP, thus, it is one of the most frequently used globalization indicators. This ratio may indicate the intensity of a country’s trade. In the case of some countries, it may not show significant growth if, during the reference period, services that are not traded internationally and are included in GDP grow more rapidly than exports. Furthermore, larger economies tend to show lower export to GDP ratios because the larger domestic demand. [ ( exports / GDP ) * 100 ] Indicator: Total trade per capita, value in thousands of US $, current prices Total trade per capita measures the relative importance of international trade against the size of the country in terms of population. It is a very concrete measure of the value of international trade per person. [ ( absolute values of imports + exports ) / population ] Indicator: Total trade to GDP, % Total trade (the sum of exports and imports) as a share of GDP measures the dependence on foreign markets and intermediate inputs and, on the other hand, the importance of international trade in the country. It may give indications of the degree to which an economy is open to trade, but should be interpreted with care. This indicator may be called a trade dependence or openness indicator. [ ( (exports + imports ) / GDP ) * 100 ] Indicator: Trade balance to GDP, % Trade balance to GDP highlights the countries with major surplus or deficit in the reference period in relation to the size of their economies. [ ( ( exports - imports ) / GDP ) * 100 ] Indicator: Trade balance to total trade, % Indicator measures international transactions of the country with the rest of the world normalised against its own total trade. This indicator is sometimes also called the normalized trade balance. [ ( ( exports - imports ) / ( exports + imports ) ) * 100 ] Indicator: Trade balance, value in millions of US $, current prices Trade balance shows the difference between exports and imports (surplus / deficit). This conventional measure reflects a country’s performance in international markets in terms of the net value of goods and services transactions between the country and the rest of the world. [ ( exports - imports ) ]
  • H
    • August 2018
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 December, 2018
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      The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, access to knowledge and a decent standard of living. The HDI is the geometric mean of normalized indices for each of the the three dimensions.
  • I
    • November 2018
      Source: IMD World Competitiveness Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 December, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The IMD World Talent Ranking is based on countries’ performance in three main categories — investment and development, appeal and readiness. The three categories assess how countries perform in a wide range of areas. These include education, apprenticeships, workplace training, language skills, cost of living, quality of life, remuneration and tax rates. The objective of the IMD World Talent Ranking is to assess the extent to which countries develop, attract and retain talent to sustain the talent pool available for enterprises operating in those economies. While the hard data used in this report have been gathered from various sources (see Appendix), the survey data were obtained from the Center’s executive opinion survey, designed for the World Competitiveness Yearbook.
    • January 2018
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: World Economic Forum The Inclusive Development Index (IDI) is an annual assessment of 103 countries’ economic performance that measures how countries perform on eleven dimensions of economic progress in addition to GDP. It has 3 pillars; growth and development; inclusion and; intergenerational equity – sustainable stewardship of natural and financial resources. The IDI is a project of the World Economic Forum’s System Initiative on the Future of Economic Progress, which aims to inform and enable sustained and inclusive economic progress through deepened public-private cooperation through thought leadership and analysis, strategic dialogue and concrete cooperation, including by accelerating social impact through corporate action.
    • September 2015
      Source: Pearson
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2015
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      The Global Index of Cognitive Skills and Educational Attainment compares the performance of 39 countries and one region (Hong Kong) on two categories of education: Cognitive Skills and Educational Attainment. The Index provides a snapshot of the relative performance of countries based on their education outputs.List of indicators   Main sourceMain year1. Cognitive Skills  1.1  Grade 8  1.1.1  Reading Literacy - PISAOECD - PISA report20091.1.2  Mathematics Literacy - PISA and TIMSSEIU based on IEA and OECD data 1.1.2.1  PISA - Mathematics LiteracyOECD - PISA report20091.1.2.2  TIMSS - Mathematics AchievementIEA - TIMSS and PIRLS International Study Center20071.1.3  Science Literacy - PISA and TIMSSEIU based on IEA and OECD data 1.1.3.1  PISA - Science LiteracyOECD - PISA report20091.1.3.2  TIMSS - Science  AchievementIEA - TIMSS and PIRLS International Study Center20071.2  Grade 4  1.2.1  PIRLS - Reading Literacy AchievementIEA - TIMSS and PIRLS International Study Center20061.2.2  TIMSS - Mathematics  AchievementIEA - TIMSS and PIRLS International Study Center20071.2.3  TIMSS - Science  AchievementIEA - TIMSS and PIRLS International Study Center20072. Educational Attainment  2.1  Literacy rate  2.1.1  Literacy rate (15 and over), %UNESCO Institute for Statistics (UIS)20102.2  Graduation rate  2.2.1  Graduation rate at upper secondary level OECD 20102.2.2  Graduation rate at tertiary level OECD 2010
    • February 2019
      Source: Heritage Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 February, 2019
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      Data cited at: Heritage Foundation   Economic freedom is the fundamental right of every human to control his or her own labor and property. In an economically free society, individuals are free to work, produce, consume, and invest in any way they please, with that freedom both protected by the state and unconstrained by the state. In economically free societies, governments allow labor, capital and goods to move freely, and refrain from coercion or constraint of liberty beyond the extent necessary to protect and maintain liberty itself. Economic Freedom Scores: Range and level of freedom 80–100:- Free 70–79.9:- Mostly Free 60–69.9:- Moderately Free 50–59.9:- Mostly Unfree 0–49.9:- Repressed
    • January 2006
      Source: American University
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
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      International patent protection: 1960–2005 Walter G. Park ∗ Department of Economics, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA Received 24 October 2007; received in revised form 14 December 2007; accepted 29 January 2008 Available online 10 March 2008 http://fs2.american.edu/wgp/www/res_policy08.pdf
    • October 2017
      Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 September, 2018
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      The mission of the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) is to provide the public with a reliable and convenient reporting mechanism to submit information to the FBI concerning suspected Internet-facilitated criminal activity and to develop effective alliances with industry partners. Information is processed for investigative and intelligence purposes for law enforcement and public awareness.
  • K
    • January 2012
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 August, 2013
      Select Dataset
      The World Bank’s Knowledge Assessment Methodology (KAM: www.worldbank.org/kam) is an online interactive tool that produces the Knowledge Economy Index (KEI)–an aggregate index representing a country’s or region’s overall preparedness to compete in the Knowledge Economy (KE). The KEI is based on a simple average of four subindexes, which represent the four pillars of the knowledge economy:  Economic Incentive and Institutional Regime (EIR)  Innovation and Technological Adoption  Education and Training  Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) Infrastructure The EIR comprises incentives that promote the efficient use of existing and new knowledge and the flourishing of entrepreneurship. An efficient innovation system made up of firms, research centers, universities, think tanks, consultants, and other organizations can tap into the growing stock of global knowledge, adapt it to local needs, and create new technological solutions. An educated and appropriately trained population is capable of creating, sharing, and using knowledge. A modern and accessible ICT infrastructure serves to facilitate the effective communication, dissemination, and processing of information.
  • L
    • June 2018
      Source: Legatum Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 December, 2018
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    • May 2018
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 August, 2018
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      The Logistics Performance Index overall score reflects assessments of a country's logistics based on efficiency of the customs clearance process, quality of trade- and transport-related infrastructure, ease of arranging competitively priced shipments, quality of logistics services, ability to track and trace consignments, and frequency with which shipments reach the consignee within the scheduled time. The index ranges from 1 to 5, with a higher score representing better performance. Data are from Logistics Performance Index surveys conducted by the World Bank in partnership with academic and international institutions and private companies and individuals engaged in international logistics. 2011 round of surveys covered more than 6,000 country assessments by nearly 1,000 international freight forwarders. Respondents evaluated eight markets on six core dimensions using a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best). The markets are chosen based on the most important export and import markets of the respondent's country, random selection, and, for landlocked countries, neighboring countries that connect them with international markets. Scores for the six areas are averaged across all respondents and aggregated to a single score using principal components analysis. Details of the survey methodology and index construction methodology are in Connecting to Compete 2012: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy (2012).
  • M
    • May 2018
      Source: globalEDGE
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 June, 2018
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      Global marketing has become more and more important over the years with the increasing trend of internationalization. Faced with too many choices, marketers have the challenge of determining which international markets to enter and the appropriate marketing strategies for those countries. The purpose of this study is to rank, with a U.S. focus, the market potential of the largest economies and to provide guidance to the U.S. companies that plan to expand their markets internationally. While the U.S. is not included in the rankings, the insights provided by the index are still applicable to companies located in other international markets. This indexing study is conducted by the Michigan State University — International Business Center to help companies compare prospect markets on several dimensions. Eight dimensions are chosen to represent the market potential of a country on a scale of 1 to 100. The dimensions are measured using various indicators and are weighted in determining their contribution to the overall Market Potential Index(MPI). Between years 1996 and 2014, the MPI has been calculated for 26 countries identified as "Emerging Markets" by The Economist magazine. However, in order to cover a wider range of markets, a decision has been made in 2014 to increase the number of countries according to the criteria explained below.
    • December 2018
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 December, 2018
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      This Dataset contains Indicators related to IC Development Index and Tables from "Measuring the Information Society Report 2018, Volume 1" For Indicators for other ICT Development data please refer: https://knoema.com/ITUKIICT2019/global-ict-developments
  • N
    • June 2018
      Source: Freedom House
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 October, 2018
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      Note: The ratings are based on a scale of 1 to 7, with 1 representing the highest level of democratic progress and 7 the lowest. Nations in Transit is Freedom House’s research project on democracy in the 29 formerly communist countries from Central Europe to Central Asia. The flagship of the project is an annual survey of democratic reform that has been published since 1995, and with the same methodology since 2003. Nations in Transit also publishes briefs on topics relevant to democratic reform in the region. The Nations in Transit annual report researchers score the countries on a scale of 1 to 7 in seven categories:National Democratic Governance. Considers the democratic character and stability of the governmental system; the independence, effectiveness, and accountability of legislative and executive branches; and the democratic oversight of military and security services. Electoral Process. Examines national executive and legislative elections, electoral processes, the development of multiparty systems, and popular participation in the political process.Civil Society. Assesses the growth of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), their organizational capacity and financial sustainability, and the legal and political environment in which they function; the development of free trade unions; and interest group participation in the policy process. Independent Media. Addresses the current state of press freedom, including libel laws, harassment of journalists, and editorial independence; the emergence of a financially viable private press; and internet access for private citizens. Local Democratic Governance. Considers the decentralization of power; the responsibilities, election, and capacity of local governmental bodies; and the transparency and accountability of local authorities. Judicial Framework and Independence. Highlights constitutional reform, human rights protections, criminal code reform, judicial independence, the status of ethnic minority rights, guarantees of equality before the law, treatment of suspects and prisoners, and compliance with judicial decisions. Corruption. Looks at public perceptions of corruption, the business interests of top policymakers, laws on financial disclosure and conflict of interest, and the efficacy of anticorruption initiatives.  These category scores are straight-averaged to create a country’s “Democracy Score” on a scale of 1 to 7, with 1 being the most democratic, and 7 the least.   Freedom House contracts independent researchers from academia, journalism, and civil society for each country to draft the country reports and make the initial scoring. These draft country reports and score proposals are sent to between three and six reviewers per country per year for comments. After researchers have a chance to respond to the comments, Nations in Transit and its advisors meet to finalize scores for each country. Where possible, scores reflect the consensus of researchers, reviewers, advisors, and Freedom House, but Freedom House has the final vote on all score changes. The annual report is currently funded through a grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). USAID has no say in the methodology or conclusions of the report.
  • O
    • November 2018
      Source: Ocean Health Index
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2018
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      Ocean Health Index
    • June 2018
      Source: Open Data Research Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 June, 2018
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      Produced by the World Wide Web Foundation as a collaborative work of the Open Data for Development (OD4D) network and with the support of the Omidyar Network, the Open Data Barometer (ODB) aims to uncover the true prevalence and impact of open data initiatives around the world. It analyses global trends, and provides comparative data on countries and regions using an in-depth methodology that combines contextual data, technical assessments and secondary indicators. Covering 115 jurisdictions in the fourth edition, the Barometer ranks governments on:Readinessfor open data initiatives.Implementationof open data programmes.Impactthat open data is having on business, politics and civil society. After three successful editions, the fourth marks another step towards becoming a global policymaking tool with a participatory and inclusive process and a strong regional focus. This year’s Barometer includes an assessment of government performance in fulfilling the Open Data Charter principles. The Barometer is a truly global and collaborative effort, with input from more than 100 researchers and government representatives. It takes over six months and more than 10,000 hours of research work to compile. During this process, we address more than 20,000 questions and respond to more than 5,000 comments and suggestions.  
    • June 2016
      Source: Open Data Research Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 September, 2018
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      Peer-reviewed numerical scores assigned to each primary data variable collected for the Open Data Barometer.
    • April 2018
      Source: Open Data Watch
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 April, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at: Open Data Watch https://opendatawatch.com/ Topic: Open Data Inventory (ODIN) data Publication: http://odin.opendatawatch.com/data/download License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   Score Type Options: Three sets of scores are available: raw, weighted, or standardized. Raw scores have values between 0 and 1 as recorded in the original assessment; subscores are simple totals. Weighted scores use a predefined weighting matrix; subscores are simple totals. Standardized scores are scaled from 0 to 100; subscores are weighted averages.
  • P
    • December 2018
      Source: Passport Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 December, 2018
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      Passport Index is an interactive tool, which collects, displays and ranks the passports of the world. You can discover the world’s passports on a map, by country name, by Passport Power Rank and even by the color of their cover. Visa Free Score Passports accumulate points for each visa free country that their holders can visit without a visa, or they can obtain a visa on arrival. Passport Power Rank Passports are ranked based on their Visa Free Score. The higher the Visa Free Score, the better the Passport Power Rank. Methodology The country list is based on the 193 UN member countries and 6 territories (Macao, Kosovo, etc.) for a total of 199. Territories annexed to other countries such as Norfolk Island, French Polynesia, etc. are excluded. Data is based on research from publicly available sources, as well as information shared by government agencies.
    • December 2018
      Source: Political Terror Scale
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 January, 2019
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      citation: Gib­ney, Mark, Linda Cor­nett, Reed Wood, Peter Hasch­ke, and Daniel Arnon. 2016. The Polit­ic­al Ter­ror Scale 1976-2015. Date Re­trieved, from the Polit­ic­al Ter­ror Scale website: ht­tp://www.polit­ic­al­ter­rorscale.org.   Political Terror Scale Levels 1 - Coun­tries un­der a se­cure rule of law, people are not im­prisoned for their views, and tor­ture is rare or ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murders are ex­tremely rare. 2 - There is a lim­ited amount of im­pris­on­ment for non­vi­ol­ent polit­ic­al activ­ity. However, few per­sons are af­fected, tor­ture and beat­ings are ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murder is rare. 3 - There is ex­tens­ive polit­ic­al im­pris­on­ment, or a re­cent his­tory of such im­pris­on­ment. Ex­e­cu­tion or oth­er polit­ic­al murders and bru­tal­ity may be com­mon. Un­lim­ited de­ten­tion, with or without a tri­al, for polit­ic­al views is ac­cep­ted. 4 - Civil and polit­ic­al rights vi­ol­a­tions have ex­pan­ded to large num­bers of the pop­u­la­tion. Murders, dis­ap­pear­ances, and tor­ture are a com­mon part of life. In spite of its gen­er­al­ity, on this level ter­ror af­fects those who in­terest them­selves in polit­ics or ideas. 5 - Ter­ror has ex­pan­ded to the whole pop­u­la­tion. The lead­ers of these so­ci­et­ies place no lim­its on the means or thor­ough­ness with which they pur­sue per­son­al or ideo­lo­gic­al goals.
  • Q
    • January 2019
      Source: Quality of Government Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 February, 2019
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      Data cited at: The Quality of Government Institute; Teorell, Jan, Stefan Dahlberg, Sören Holmberg, Bo Rothstein, Natalia Alvarado Pachon & Richard Svensson. 2018. The Quality of Government Standard Dataset, version Jan18. University of Gothenburg: The Quality of Government Institute, http://www.qog.pol.gu.se doi:10.18157/QoGStdJan18   In the QoG Standard TS dataset, data from 1946 to 2018 is included and the unit of analysis is country-year (e.g. Sweden-1946, Sweden-1947 and so on).    
  • R
  • S
    • June 2014
      Source: Scimago Lab
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 June, 2014
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      The SIR reports are not league tables. The ranking parameter –the scientific output of institutions- should be understood as a default rank, not our ranking proposal. The only goal of this report is to characterize research outcomes of organizations so as to provide useful scientometric information to institutions, policymakers and research manager so they are able to analyze, evaluate and improve their research results. If someone uses this report to rank institutions or to build a league table with any purpose, he/she will do it under his/her own responsibility. Output - Total number of documents published in scholarly journals indexed in Scopus (Romo-Fernández, et al., 2011). International Collaboration - Institution's output ratio produced in collaboration with foreign institutions. The values are computed by analyzing an institution's output whose affiliations include more than one country address (Guerrero-Bote, Olmeda-Gómez and Moya-Anegón, 2013; Lancho-Barrantes, Guerrero-Bote and Moya-Anegón, 2013; Lancho-Barrantes, et al., 2013; Chinchilla-Rodríguez, et al., 2012) Normalized Impact - Normalized Impact is computed using the methodology established by the Karolinska Intitutet in Sweden where it is named "Item oriented field normalized citation score average". The normalization of the citation values is done on an individual article level. The values (in %) show the relationship between an institution's average scientific impact and the world average set to a score of 1, --i.e. a NI score of 0.8 means the institution is cited 20% below world average and 1.3 means the institution is cited 30% above average (Rehn and Kronman, 2008; González-Pereira, Guerrero-Bote and Moya- Anegón, 2011). High Quality Publications - Ratio of publications that an institution publishes in the most influential scholarly journals of the world, those ranked in the first quartile (25%) in their categories as ordered by SCImago Journal Rank (SJRII) indicator (Miguel, Chinchilla-Rodríguez and Moya-Anegón, 2011). Specialization Index - The Specialization Index indicates the extent of thematic concentration /dispersion of an institution’s scientific output. Values range between 0 and 1, indicating generalist vs. specialized institutions respectively. This indicator is computed according to the Gini Index used in Economy (Moed, et. al., 2011; López-Illescas, Moya-Anegón and Moed, 2011; Arencibia-Jorge et al., 2012). In this indicator, when the value is 0 it means that the data are not sufficient to calculate. Excellence Rate - Excellence rate indicates the amount (in %) of an institution’s scientific output that is included into the set of the 10% of the most cited papers in their respective scientific fields. It is a measure of high quality output of research institutions (SCImago Lab, 2011; Bornmann, Moya-Anegón and Leydesdorff, 2012; Guerrero-Bote and Moya-Anegón, 2012). Scientific Leadership - Leadership indicates an institution’s “output as main contributor”, that is the number of papers in which the corresponding author belongs to the institution (Moya-Anegón, 2012; Moya-Anegón et. al, 2013; Moya-Anegón, et al., forthcoming) Excellence with Leadership - Excellence with Leadership indicates the amount of documents in the Excellence rate in which the institution is the main contributor (Moya-Anegón, et al., 2013).
    • August 2018
      Source: Social Progress Imperative
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2018
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      The Social Progress Index is a new way to define the success of our societies. It is a comprehensive measure of real quality of life, independent of economic indicators. The Social Progress Index is designed to complement, rather than replace, economic measures such as GDP. Each year, Social Progress Imperative conducts a comprehensive review of all indicators included in the Social Progress Index framework to check data updates (which frequently include retroactive revisions) and whether new indicators have been published that are well-suited to describing social progress concepts. Such a review necessitates a recalculation of previously published versions of the Social Progress Index, as any removal or additions of indicators to the framework or changes due to retroactive revisions in data from the original data sources prevent comparability between previously published versions of the Social Progress Index and the 2018 Social Progress Index. Therefore, using the 2018 Social Progress Index framework and methodology, we provide comparable historical data for four additional years of the Social Progress Index, from 2014 to 2017. To read more about our methodology, please see the 2018 Methodology here https://www.socialprogress.org/index/methodology
    • February 2018
      Source: Fraser Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 March, 2018
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      Data cited at: "Annual Survey of Mining Companies: 2016"@Fraser Institute   The Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies was sent to approximately 4,100 exploration, development, and other mining-related companies around the world. Several mining publications and associations also helped publicize the survey. The survey, conducted from October 9, 2012, to January 6, 2013, represents responses from 742 of those companies. The companies participating in the survey reported exploration spending of US$6.2 billion in 2012 and US$ 5.4 billion in 2011.
    • October 2018
      Source: Sustainable Governance Indicators
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 November, 2018
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      The SGI is a platform built on a cross-national survey of governance that identifies reform needs in 41 EU and OECD countries. The SGI brings together a broad network of experts and practitioners aiming to understand what works best in sustainable governance. Advocating the exchange of best practices, we offer full access to our data set and enable the comparisons that generate innovation in governance.
  • T
    • November 2015
      Source: Save the Children Federation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2015
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    • October 2018
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2018
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic: The Global Competitiveness Report Publication URL: http://www3.weforum.org/docs/GCR2018/GCI_4.0_2018_Dataset.xlsx License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode
    • March 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 March, 2017
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic: The Global Enabling Trade Report 2016 Publication URL: http://reports.weforum.org/global-enabling-trade-report-2016/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode   The Enabling Trade Index (ETI) was developed within the context of the World Economic Forum’s Transportation Industry Partnership program, and was first published in The Global Enabling Trade Report 2008. The ETI measures the extent to which individual economies have developed institutions, policies, and services facilitating the free flow of goods over borders and to destination. The structure of the Index reflects the main enablers of trade, breaking them into four overall issue areas, captured in the subindexes: 1) The market access subindex measures the extent to which the policy framework of the country welcomes foreign goods into the economy and enables access to foreign markets for its exporters. 2) The border administration subindex assesses the extent to which the administration at the border facilitates the entry and exit of goods. 3) Infrastructure subindex takes into account whether the country has in place the transport and communications infrastructure necessary to facilitate the movement of goods within the country and across the border. 4) The business environment subindex looks at the quality of governance as well as at the overarching regulatory and security environment impacting the business of importers and exporters active in the country. Each of these four subindexes is composed in turn of a number of pillars of enabling trade, of which there are seven in all. These are: 1) Domestic market access; 2) Foreign market access; 3) Efficiency and transparency of border administration; 4) Availability and quality of transport infrastructure; 5) Availability and quality of transport services; 6) Availability and use of ICTs; 7) Operating environment. Each indicator and sub-indicator is given a score on a scale of 1 to 7 that corresponds to the worst and best possible outcome, respectively.
    • September 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 September, 2017
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic: The Global Human Capital Report 2017 Publication URL: https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-global-human-capital-report-2017 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode
    • February 2015
      Source: University of Keele
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 April, 2015
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      This water poverty index is a first pass at trying to establish an international measure comparing performance in the water sector across countries in a holistic way that brings in the diverse aspects and issues that are relevant. It does seem to give some sensible results but it does not pretend to be definitive nor offer a totally accurate measure of the situation.
    • March 2017
      Source: Bloomberg
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 November, 2017
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      To identify the healthiest countries in the world, Bloomberg Rankings created health scores and health-risk scores for countries with populations of at least 1 million. The risk score was subtracted from the health score to determine the country''s rank. Five-year averages, when available, were used to mitigate some of the short-term year-over-year swings.
    • December 2013
      Source: Strategy&
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 December, 2013
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    • April 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 April, 2017
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      The rise of travel and tourism has shown significant resilience globally. Despite slow economic growth in advanced economies and geopolitical tensions in some regions, the T&T sector still accounts for a large part of the global economy (estimated to be approximately 9% of global GDP or US$ 7 trillion) and employment,while the number of international travellers continues to increase. According to the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), the T&T sector is forecast to continue growing at 4% annually—faster than financial services,transport and manufacturing
    • June 2018
      Source: Pew Research Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 August, 2018
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      Levels of restrictions on religion Government Restrictions Index Very high- 6.6 to 10.0 High- 4.5 to 6.5 Moderate - 2.4 to 4.4 Low- 0.0 to 2.3 Social Hostilities Index Very high- 7.2 to 10.0 High- 3.6 to 7.1 Moderate- 1.5 to 3.5 Low- 0.0 to 1.4
  • W
    • October 2018
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 October, 2018
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      Note: In recent years, Doing Business introduced improvements to all of its indicator sets. In Doing Business 2015, Resolving Insolvency introduced new measures of quality, while Getting Credit and Protecting Minority Investors broadened their existing measures. In Doing Business 2016, Dealing with Construction Permits, Getting Electricity, Registering Property and Enforcing Contracts also introduced new measures of quality, and Trading across Borders introduced a new case scenario to increase the economic relevance. In Doing Business 2017, Paying Taxes introduced new measures of post-filing processes and Starting a Business, Registering Property and Enforcing Contracts added gender components. For the details on the Doing Business methodology changes, please view the Ease of Doing Business metrics. Each methodology expansion was recalculated for one year to provide comparable indicator values and scores for the previous year. Rankings are calculated for Doing Business 2019 only. Year-to-year changes in the number of economies, number of indicators and methodology affect the comparability of prior years.
    • May 2018
      Source: IMD World Competitiveness Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2018
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      The IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook analyzes and ranks the ability of a country to facilitate an environment in which enterprises can generate sustainable value.
    • February 2019
      Source: World Energy Council
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 February, 2019
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      The World Energy Council’s Energy Trilemma Index tool, produced in partnership with Oliver Wyman, ranks countries on their ability to provide sustainable energy through 3 dimensions: Energy security, Energy equity (accessibility and affordability), Environmental sustainability. The ranking measures overall performance in achieving a sustainable mix of policies and the balance score highlights how well a country manages the trade-offs of the Trilemma with "A" being the best.
    • October 2018
      Source: Charities Aid Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2018
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      Data cited at: Charities Aid Foundation CAF World Giving Index 2018 : This ninth edition of the CAF World Giving Index presents giving data from across the globe over a five year period (2013-2017). The CAF World Giving Index 2018 includes data from 146 countries that was collected throughout 2017. A full explanation of the methodology used is included in the appendices. CAF World Giving Index ranking and scores: The method used to calculate CAF World Giving Index scores remains identical to previous years. In order to establish a rounded measure of giving behavior across the world, the CAF World Giving Index relies on a simple averaging of the responses from the three key questions asked in each country. Each country is given a percentage score and countries are ranked on the basis of these scores.
    • March 2018
      Source: Sustainable Development Solutions Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 March, 2018
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      The World Happiness Report is a landmark survey of the state of global happiness. The World Happiness Report 2018, ranks 156 countries by their happiness levels, and 117 countries by the happiness of their immigrants. The main focus of this year’s report, in addition to its usual ranking of the levels and changes in happiness around the world, is on migration within and between countries. The overall rankings of country happiness are based on the pooled results from Gallup World Poll surveys from 2015-2017, and show both change and stability. There is a new top ranking country, Finland, but the top ten positions are held by the same countries as in the last two years, although with some swapping of places. Four different countries have held top spot in the four most recent reports- Denmark, Switzerland, Norway and now Finland. All the top countries tend to have high values for all six of the key variables that have been found to support well-being: income, healthy life expectancy, social support, freedom, trust and generosity. Among the top countries, differences are small enough that that year-to-year changes in the rankings are to be expected. The analysis of happiness changes from 2008-2010 to 2015-2015 shows Togo as the biggest gainer, moving up 17 places in the overall rankings from the last place position it held as recently as in the 2015 rankings. The biggest loser is Venezuela, down 2.2 points on the 0 to 10 scale.
    • April 2014
      Source: The Earth Institute, Columbia University
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 April, 2014
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      The World Happiness Report 2013 is a study conducted by Columbia University's Earth Institute and published in September 2013 by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). It reveals trends in the data judging just how happy countries really are on a scale running from 0 to 10. The report uses data from people in over 150 countries, surveyed by Gallup over the period 2010-12. Six key variables explain three-quarters of the variation in annual national average scores over time and among countries. These six factors include: real GDP per capita, healthy life expectancy, having someone to count on, perceived freedom to make life choices, freedom from corruption, and generosity. Note: datapoints for 2012 and 2007 refer to national averages in 2010-12 and 2005-07 correspondingly; changes from 2005-07 to 2010-12 are presented for the 130 countries with data in both periods; positive affect in 2005-07 does not include happiness (yesterday) since happiness data were not collected in the period. Reference: World Happiness Report 2013, Appendix material for Chapter 2 "World Happiness:  Trends, Explanations and Distribution", John F. Helliwell & Shun Wang.
    • May 2018
      Source: Reporters Without Borders
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 May, 2018
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      The press freedom index that Reporters Without Borders publishes every year measures the level of freedom of information in nearly 180 countries. It reflects the degree of freedom that journalists, news organizations and netizens enjoy in each country, and the efforts made by the authorities to respect and ensure respect for this freedom. It is based partly on a questionnaire that is sent to our partner organizations (18 freedom of expression NGOs located in all five continents), to our network of 150 correspondents, and to journalists, researchers, jurists and human rights activists. The 179 countries ranked in this year’s index are those for which Reporters Without Borders received completed questionnaires from various sources. Some countries were not included because of a lack of reliable, confirmed data. A score and a position are assigned to each country in the final ranking. They are complementary indicators that together assess the state of press freedom. In order to make the index more informative and make it easier to compare different years, scores will henceforth range from 0 to 100, with 0 being the best possible score and 100 the worst. The index reflects the situation during a specific period. This year’s index is based solely on events between the start of December 2012 and the end of November 2013. It does not look at human rights violations in general, just violations of freedom of information. The index should in no way be taken as an indication of the quality of the media in the countries concerned. The range of score to access the press freedom.  From 0 to 15 points: Good From 15.01 to 25 points: Fairly good From 25.01 to 35 points: Problematic From 35.01 to 55 points: Bad From 55.01 to 100 points: Very bad