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Burundi

  • President:Pierre Nkurunziza
  • First Vice President:Gaston Sindimwo
  • Capital city:Bujumbura
  • Languages:Kirundi 29.7% (official), Kirundi and other language 9.1%, French (official) and French and other language 0.3%, Swahili and Swahili and other language 0.2% (along Lake Tanganyika and in the Bujumbura area), English and English and other language 0.06%, more than 2 languages 3.7%, unspecified 56.9% (2008 est.)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:10,864,245 (2017)
  • Area, sq km:25,680 (2017)
  • GDP per capita, US$:320 (2017)
  • GDP, billion current US$:3.5 (2017)
  • GINI index:38.6 (2013)
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:164 (2017)

Deaths

All datasets:  C U
  • C
    • November 2018
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 December, 2018
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      The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories, and at the subnational level for a subset of countries.
    • February 2019
      Source: United Nations Children's Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 April, 2019
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      Global and regional deaths of children under 5 years of age by cause. Estimates generated by the WHO and Maternal and Child Epidemiology Estimation Group (MCEE) 2018.
  • U
    • February 2017
      Source: United Nations Children's Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 August, 2017
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      Maternal mortality refers to deaths due to complications from pregnancy or childbirth. From 1990 to 2015, the global maternal mortality ratio declined by 44 per cent – from 385 deaths to 216 deaths per 100,000 live births, according to UN inter-agency estimates. This translates into an average annual rate of reduction of 2.3 per cent. While impressive, this is less than half the 5.5 per cent annual rate needed to achieve the three-quarters reduction in maternal mortality targeted for 2015 in Millennium Development Goal 5. Every region has advanced, although levels of maternal mortality remain unacceptably high in sub-Saharan Africa. Almost all maternal deaths can be prevented, as evidenced by the huge disparities found between the richest and poorest countries. The lifetime risk of maternal death in high-income countries is 1 in 3,300, compared to 1 in 41 in low-income.