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Eurostat

Eurostat is the statistical office of the European Union situated in Luxembourg. Its task is to provide the European Union with statistics at European level that enable comparisons between countries and regions and to promote the harmonisation of statistical methods across EU member states and candidates for accession as well as EFTA countries.

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    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include: Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc. Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include: Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc. Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include: Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc. Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include: Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc. Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The air accident data are provided to Eurostat by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). EASA as an Agency is responsible for providing common standards of safety and environmental protection in civil aviation in Europe and worldwide. It is the centrepiece of regulations creating a single European market in the aviation industry. The Agency’s responsibilities include aviation safety analysis and research for which it also collects statistics on European and worldwide aviation safety. The statistics are grouped according to type of operation, such as commercial air transport or general aviation, and aircraft category, such as aeroplanes, helicopters or gliders. The EASA manages and is responsible for the entire data collection. The selection of data made available to Eurostat does not differ from those available through the EASA (http://easa.europa.eu). In Eurobase, the following data are available: Air accident victims in commercial air transport, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviaca); Air accident victims in aerial works, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviaaw); Air accident victims in general aviation, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft – maximum take-off mass above 2250 kg (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviagah); Air accident victims in general aviation by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft – maximum take-off mass under 2250 kg (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviagal).
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The air accident data are provided to Eurostat by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). EASA as an Agency is responsible for providing common standards of safety and environmental protection in civil aviation in Europe and worldwide. It is the centrepiece of regulations creating a single European market in the aviation industry. The Agency’s responsibilities include aviation safety analysis and research for which it also collects statistics on European and worldwide aviation safety. The statistics are grouped according to type of operation, such as commercial air transport or general aviation, and aircraft category, such as aeroplanes, helicopters or gliders. The EASA manages and is responsible for the entire data collection. The selection of data made available to Eurostat does not differ from those available through the EASA (http://easa.europa.eu). In Eurobase, the following data are available: Air accident victims in commercial air transport, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviaca); Air accident victims in aerial works, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviaaw); Air accident victims in general aviation, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft – maximum take-off mass above 2250 kg (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviagah); Air accident victims in general aviation by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft – maximum take-off mass under 2250 kg (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviagal).
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The air accident data are provided to Eurostat by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). EASA as an Agency is responsible for providing common standards of safety and environmental protection in civil aviation in Europe and worldwide. It is the centrepiece of regulations creating a single European market in the aviation industry. The Agency’s responsibilities include aviation safety analysis and research for which it also collects statistics on European and worldwide aviation safety. The statistics are grouped according to type of operation, such as commercial air transport or general aviation, and aircraft category, such as aeroplanes, helicopters or gliders. The EASA manages and is responsible for the entire data collection. The selection of data made available to Eurostat does not differ from those available through the EASA (http://easa.europa.eu). In Eurobase, the following data are available: Air accident victims in commercial air transport, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviaca); Air accident victims in aerial works, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviaaw); Air accident victims in general aviation, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft – maximum take-off mass above 2250 kg (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviagah); Air accident victims in general aviation by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft – maximum take-off mass under 2250 kg (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviagal).
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The air accident data are provided to Eurostat by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). EASA as an Agency is responsible for providing common standards of safety and environmental protection in civil aviation in Europe and worldwide. It is the centrepiece of regulations creating a single European market in the aviation industry. The Agency’s responsibilities include aviation safety analysis and research for which it also collects statistics on European and worldwide aviation safety. The statistics are grouped according to type of operation, such as commercial air transport or general aviation, and aircraft category, such as aeroplanes, helicopters or gliders. The EASA manages and is responsible for the entire data collection. The selection of data made available to Eurostat does not differ from those available through the EASA (http://easa.europa.eu). In Eurobase, the following data are available: Air accident victims in commercial air transport, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviaca); Air accident victims in aerial works, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviaaw); Air accident victims in general aviation, by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft – maximum take-off mass above 2250 kg (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviagah); Air accident victims in general aviation by country of occurrence and country of registry of aircraft – maximum take-off mass under 2250 kg (EASA data) (tran_sf_aviagal).
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • February 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
  • F
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
  • M
  • N
    • April 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 April, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the administrative data collection 'European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW)', on the basis of a methodology developed first in 1990. An accident at work is defined as 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. The data include only fatal and non-fatal accidents involving more than 3 calendar days of absence from work. If the accident does not lead to the death of the victim it is called a 'non-fatal' (or 'serious') accident. A fatal accident at work is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The variables collected  on accidents at work include:Economic activity of the employer and size of the enterpriseEmployment status, occupation, age, sex and nationality of victimGeographical location, date and time of the accidentType of injury, body part injured and the severity of the accident (number of full calendar days during which the victim is unfit for work excluding the day of the accident, permanent incapacity or death within one year of the accident).Variables on causes and circumstances of the accident: workstation, working environment, working process, specific physical activity, material agent of the specific physical activity, deviation and material agent of deviation, contact - mode of injury and material agent of contact - mode of injury. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the accident insurance of the national social security system, a private insurance for accidents at work or to other relevant national authorities (labour inspection etc.). As an exception, accident data for the Netherlands are based on survey data. On the Eurostat website, ESAW data are disseminated in two sections: 'Main Indicators' and 'Details by economic sector (NACE Rev2, 2008 onwards)'. Depending on the table, data are broken down by: economic activity (NACE 'main sectors' (1 digit code) or more detailed NACE divisions (2 digit codes)); the occupation of the victim (ISCO-08 code); country; severity of the accident, sex, age, employment status, size  of the enterprise, body part injured and type of injury. The data is presented in form of numbers, percentages, incidence rates and standardised incidence rates of non-fatal and fatal accidents at work, either for EU aggregates, countries or certain breakdowns by dimensions such as age, sex etc.Numbers correspond to a simple count of all non-fatal and fatal accidents for the entirety or certain breakdowns of the data;Percentages represent shares of breakdowns;The incidence rate of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work is the number of serious or fatal accidents per 100,000 persons in employment;The standardised incidence rates of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work aim to eliminate differences in the structures of countries' economies (see section 20.6 Adjustment for more details). The incidence rate indicates the relative importance of non-fatal or fatal accidents at work in the working population. For both types of accidents at work the numerator is the number of accidents that occurred during the year. The denominator is the reference population (i.e. the number of persons in employment) expressed in 100,000 persons. The reference population (or number of persons in employment) related to the national ESAW reporting system is provided by the Member States, either from administrative sources related to accidents at work or from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS).
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW), on the basis of a methodology developed in 1990. The data refer to accidents at work resulting in more than 3 days' absence from work (serious accidents) and fatal accidents. A fatal accident is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The indicators used are the number and incidence rate of serious and fatal accidents at work. The incidence rate of serious accidents at work is the number of persons involved in accidents at work with more than 3 days' absence per 100,000 persons in employment. The incidence rate of fatal accidents at work is the number of persons with fatal accidents at work per 100,000 persons in employment. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the public (Social Security) or private specific insurance for accidents at work, or to other relevant national authority (Labour Inspection, etc.) for countries having a "universal" Social Security system. For the Netherlands only survey data are available for the non-fatal accidents at work (a special module in the national labour force survey). Sector coverage: In general the private sector is covered by all national reporting systems. However some important sectors are not covered by all Member States. The specification of sectors is given according to the NACE classification (NACE = Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté européenne). The incidence rate is calculated for the total of the so-called 9 common branches (See point 3.6). For a structured metadata overview on variables, coverage of sectors and professional status please see also the annex Metadata_overview_2007.Statistical adjustments: Because the frequency of work accidents is higher in some branches (high-risk sectors), an adjustment is performed to get more standardised incidence rates. For more details, please see the summary methodology (link at the bottom of the page). Geographical coverage: For accidents at work, data are available for all old EU-Member States (EU 15) and Norway. The methodology has also been implemented in the New Member States and Switzerland with first data being available for the reference year 2004.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW), on the basis of a methodology developed in 1990. The data refer to accidents at work resulting in more than 3 days' absence from work (serious accidents) and fatal accidents. A fatal accident is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The indicators used are the number and incidence rate of serious and fatal accidents at work. The incidence rate of serious accidents at work is the number of persons involved in accidents at work with more than 3 days' absence per 100,000 persons in employment. The incidence rate of fatal accidents at work is the number of persons with fatal accidents at work per 100,000 persons in employment. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the public (Social Security) or private specific insurance for accidents at work, or to other relevant national authority (Labour Inspection, etc.) for countries having a "universal" Social Security system. For the Netherlands only survey data are available for the non-fatal accidents at work (a special module in the national labour force survey). Sector coverage: In general the private sector is covered by all national reporting systems. However some important sectors are not covered by all Member States. The specification of sectors is given according to the NACE classification (NACE = Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté européenne). The incidence rate is calculated for the total of the so-called 9 common branches (See point 3.6). For a structured metadata overview on variables, coverage of sectors and professional status please see also the annex Metadata_overview_2007.Statistical adjustments: Because the frequency of work accidents is higher in some branches (high-risk sectors), an adjustment is performed to get more standardised incidence rates. For more details, please see the summary methodology (link at the bottom of the page). Geographical coverage: For accidents at work, data are available for all old EU-Member States (EU 15) and Norway. The methodology has also been implemented in the New Member States and Switzerland with first data being available for the reference year 2004.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW), on the basis of a methodology developed in 1990. The data refer to accidents at work resulting in more than 3 days' absence from work (serious accidents) and fatal accidents. A fatal accident is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The indicators used are the number and incidence rate of serious and fatal accidents at work. The incidence rate of serious accidents at work is the number of persons involved in accidents at work with more than 3 days' absence per 100,000 persons in employment. The incidence rate of fatal accidents at work is the number of persons with fatal accidents at work per 100,000 persons in employment. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the public (Social Security) or private specific insurance for accidents at work, or to other relevant national authority (Labour Inspection, etc.) for countries having a "universal" Social Security system. For the Netherlands only survey data are available for the non-fatal accidents at work (a special module in the national labour force survey). Sector coverage: In general the private sector is covered by all national reporting systems. However some important sectors are not covered by all Member States. The specification of sectors is given according to the NACE classification (NACE = Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté européenne). The incidence rate is calculated for the total of the so-called 9 common branches (See point 3.6). For a structured metadata overview on variables, coverage of sectors and professional status please see also the annex Metadata_overview_2007.Statistical adjustments: Because the frequency of work accidents is higher in some branches (high-risk sectors), an adjustment is performed to get more standardised incidence rates. For more details, please see the summary methodology (link at the bottom of the page). Geographical coverage: For accidents at work, data are available for all old EU-Member States (EU 15) and Norway. The methodology has also been implemented in the New Member States and Switzerland with first data being available for the reference year 2004.
  • P
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The standardised incidence rate for a country is calculated by multiplying the incidence rate for each economic sector with the ratio between the sector-specific and the total EU reference population (employed persons), and then summing up the weighted incidence rates. The standardised incidence rate assumes that the economic sectors in each country have the same relative size in terms of reference populations as the sectors at EU level. This enables a direct comparison of incidence rates between countries without being influenced by larger high or low risk sectors. The (non-standardised) incidence rate is calculated, for each country and economic sector, as the number of accidents at work (with 4 calendar days of absence from work or more) divided by the number of employed persons working in the relevant country and economic sector A, C, D, …N according to the NACE classification, revision 2, and multiplied by 100,000. An accident at work is 'a discrete occurrence in the course of work which leads to physical or mental harm'. This includes all accidents in the course of work, whether they happen inside or outside the premises of the employer, in public places or during transport and at home (such as during teleworking). It also includes cases of acute poisoning and wilful acts of other persons.
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Fatalities caused by road accidents include drivers and passengers of motorised vehicles and pedal cycles as well as pedestrians, killed within 30 days from the day of the accident. For Member States not using this definition, corrective factors were applied. The data come from the CARE database managed by DG MOVE. For more information click here.
    • September 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 September, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Fatalities caused by road accidents include drivers and passengers of motorised vehicles and pedal cycles as well as pedestrians, killed within 30 days from the day of the accident. For Member States not using this definition, corrective factors were applied. The data come from the CARE database managed by DG Mobility and Transport.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The European Union Labour Force Survey (EU-LFS) provides population estimates for the main labour market characteristics, such as employment, unemployment, inactivity, hours of work, occupation, economic activity and much else, as well as important socio-demographic characteristics, such as sex, age, education, households and regions of residence. Since 1999 an inherent part of the European Union labour force survey (LFS) are the so called 'ad-hoc modules' (AHM). Council Regulation No 577/98 specifies that a further set of variables (the AHM) may be added to supplement the information obtained from the core questionnaire of the LFS. The topic covered by the ad hoc module change every year, although some of them have been repeated.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The road accident data are taken from the CARE database, which is entirely managed by Directorate-General Mobility and Transport (MOVE) CARE is a Community database on road accidents resulting in death or injury (no statistics on damage - only accidents). The tables included in Eurobase are limited to the number of fatalities as the definition of injuries is not entirely harmonised across the Member States. The major difference between CARE and most other existing international databases is the high level of disaggregation, i.e. CARE results are based on detailed data on individual accidents as collected by the Member States. The Council decided on 30 November 1993 the creation of a Community database on road accidents (Council Decision 93/704/EC, OJ No L329 of 30.12.1993, pp. 63-65). This database at Community level (CARE - Community database on Accidents on the Roads in Europe) would make it possible to identify and quantify road safety problems, evaluate the efficiency of road safety measures, determine the relevance of Community actions and facilitate the exchange of experience in this field. National data sets are integrated into the CARE database in their original national structure and definitions, with confidential data blanked out. The Commission provides a framework of transformation rules allowing CARE to provide compatible data. The following data are available: Fatalities in road accidents by genderFatalities in road accidents by road type userFatalities in road accidents by age classFatalities in road accidents by type of area For the road accident fatalities by type of area, and notably the classification of accidents on motorways, which may also occur in urban areas, please note the following rationale: Rural : Outside urban area and no motorway/unknown Urban: inside urban area (all) Motorway: Outside urban area & motorway Unknown: urban area unknown and motorway unknown. More information can be obtained in Part 2 Road Information of the document with the CARE database variable description, the link of which is given in point 3.2.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The road accident data are taken from the CARE database, which is entirely managed by Directorate-General Mobility and Transport (MOVE) CARE is a Community database on road accidents resulting in death or injury (no statistics on damage - only accidents). The tables included in Eurobase are limited to the number of fatalities as the definition of injuries is not entirely harmonised across the Member States. The major difference between CARE and most other existing international databases is the high level of disaggregation, i.e. CARE results are based on detailed data on individual accidents as collected by the Member States. The Council decided on 30 November 1993 the creation of a Community database on road accidents (Council Decision 93/704/EC, OJ No L329 of 30.12.1993, pp. 63-65). This database at Community level (CARE - Community database on Accidents on the Roads in Europe) would make it possible to identify and quantify road safety problems, evaluate the efficiency of road safety measures, determine the relevance of Community actions and facilitate the exchange of experience in this field. National data sets are integrated into the CARE database in their original national structure and definitions, with confidential data blanked out. The Commission provides a framework of transformation rules allowing CARE to provide compatible data.   The following data are available: Fatalities in road accidents by genderFatalities in road accidents by road type userFatalities in road accidents by age classFatalities in road accidents by type of areaFatalities in road accidents by type of vehicle   Please note that data referring to the French Départements d’Outre-Mer (overseas territories) and the Portuguese autonomous regions of Açores and Madeira are not available and hence excluded from the respective national totals and the EU aggregates.   For the road accident fatalities by type of area, and notably the classification of accidents on motorways, which may also occur in urban areas, please note the following rationale: Rural : Outside urban area and no motorway/unknown Urban: inside urban area (all) Motorway: Outside urban area & motorway Unknown: urban area unknown and motorway unknown.   For the road accident fatalities by type of vehicle, please note that the position OTH (‘Other’) in the dimension VEHICLE corresponds to pedestrians. More information can be obtained in Part 2 Road Information of the document with the CARE database variable description, the link of which is given in point 3.2.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The road accident data are taken from the CARE database, which is entirely managed by Directorate-General Mobility and Transport (MOVE) CARE is a Community database on road accidents resulting in death or injury (no statistics on damage - only accidents). The tables included in Eurobase are limited to the number of fatalities as the definition of injuries is not entirely harmonised across the Member States. The major difference between CARE and most other existing international databases is the high level of disaggregation, i.e. CARE results are based on detailed data on individual accidents as collected by the Member States. The Council decided on 30 November 1993 the creation of a Community database on road accidents (Council Decision 93/704/EC, OJ No L329 of 30.12.1993, pp. 63-65). This database at Community level (CARE - Community database on Accidents on the Roads in Europe) would make it possible to identify and quantify road safety problems, evaluate the efficiency of road safety measures, determine the relevance of Community actions and facilitate the exchange of experience in this field. National data sets are integrated into the CARE database in their original national structure and definitions, with confidential data blanked out. The Commission provides a framework of transformation rules allowing CARE to provide compatible data. The following data are available: Fatalities in road accidents by genderFatalities in road accidents by road type userFatalities in road accidents by age classFatalities in road accidents by type of area For the road accident fatalities by type of area, and notably the classification of accidents on motorways, which may also occur in urban areas, please note the following rationale: Rural : Outside urban area and no motorway/unknown Urban: inside urban area (all) Motorway: Outside urban area & motorway Unknown: urban area unknown and motorway unknown. More information can be obtained in Part 2 Road Information of the document with the CARE database variable description, the link of which is given in point 3.2.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The road accident data are taken from the CARE database, which is entirely managed by Directorate-General Mobility and Transport (MOVE) CARE is a Community database on road accidents resulting in death or injury (no statistics on damage - only accidents). The tables included in Eurobase are limited to the number of fatalities as the definition of injuries is not entirely harmonised across the Member States. The major difference between CARE and most other existing international databases is the high level of disaggregation, i.e. CARE results are based on detailed data on individual accidents as collected by the Member States. The Council decided on 30 November 1993 the creation of a Community database on road accidents (Council Decision 93/704/EC, OJ No L329 of 30.12.1993, pp. 63-65). This database at Community level (CARE - Community database on Accidents on the Roads in Europe) would make it possible to identify and quantify road safety problems, evaluate the efficiency of road safety measures, determine the relevance of Community actions and facilitate the exchange of experience in this field. National data sets are integrated into the CARE database in their original national structure and definitions, with confidential data blanked out. The Commission provides a framework of transformation rules allowing CARE to provide compatible data. The following data are available: Fatalities in road accidents by genderFatalities in road accidents by road type userFatalities in road accidents by age classFatalities in road accidents by type of area For the road accident fatalities by type of area, and notably the classification of accidents on motorways, which may also occur in urban areas, please note the following rationale: Rural : Outside urban area and no motorway/unknown Urban: inside urban area (all) Motorway: Outside urban area & motorway Unknown: urban area unknown and motorway unknown. More information can be obtained in Part 2 Road Information of the document with the CARE database variable description, the link of which is given in point 3.2.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The road accident data are taken from the CARE database, which is entirely managed by Directorate-General Mobility and Transport (MOVE) CARE is a Community database on road accidents resulting in death or injury (no statistics on damage - only accidents). The tables included in Eurobase are limited to the number of fatalities as the definition of injuries is not entirely harmonised across the Member States. The major difference between CARE and most other existing international databases is the high level of disaggregation, i.e. CARE results are based on detailed data on individual accidents as collected by the Member States. The Council decided on 30 November 1993 the creation of a Community database on road accidents (Council Decision 93/704/EC, OJ No L329 of 30.12.1993, pp. 63-65). This database at Community level (CARE - Community database on Accidents on the Roads in Europe) would make it possible to identify and quantify road safety problems, evaluate the efficiency of road safety measures, determine the relevance of Community actions and facilitate the exchange of experience in this field. National data sets are integrated into the CARE database in their original national structure and definitions, with confidential data blanked out. The Commission provides a framework of transformation rules allowing CARE to provide compatible data.   The following data are available:Fatalities in road accidents by gender  Fatalities in road accidents by road type user  Fatalities in road accidents by age class  Fatalities in road accidents by type of area  Fatalities in road accidents by type of vehicle   Please note that data referring to the French Départements d’Outre-Mer (overseas territories) and the Portuguese autonomous regions of Açores and Madeira are not available and hence excluded from the respective national totals and the EU aggregates.   For the road accident fatalities by type of area, and notably the classification of accidents on motorways, which may also occur in urban areas, please note the following rationale: Rural : Outside urban area and no motorway/unknown Urban: inside urban area (all) Motorway: Outside urban area & motorway Unknown: urban area unknown and motorway unknown.   For the road accident fatalities by type of vehicle, please note that the position OTH (‘Other’) in the dimension VEHICLE corresponds to pedestrians. More information can be obtained in Part 2 Road Information of the document with the CARE database variable description, the link of which is given in point 3.2.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on:the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics ofthe employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value:providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on:the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics ofthe employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value:providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data collection is based on the two Labour Force Survey ad-hoc modules (LFS AHMs) carried out in 2007 and 2013, and provides information on: the number of employed persons who had one or more accidents at work resulting in injuries and which occurred in the last 12 months before the survey;the number of employed persons having had one or more work-related physical or mental health problems in the 12 months before the survey which were caused or made worse by work apart from the previously mentioned accidents at work;the type of the most serious work-related health problem caused or made worse by work;the exposure at work to certain risk factor(s) that can affect physical health or mental well-being. In addition, the data published on the Eurostat website provides information on certain characteristics of the employed person: sex, age, educational attainment level, occupation, employment status, full/part-time work, atypical working hours and the job done when the most recent accident at work resulting in injury occurred (main, second, last job etc.);the enterprise or other employer: area of economic activity (according to the NACE classification of economic activities in the European Union) and the sizes of the enterprises;the accident: whether the accident was a road traffic accident or not, and the period off work because of the accident;whether the most serious health problem caused of made worse by work limits the ability to carry out day to day activities either at work or outside work. Compared with the administrative data collection ESAW (European Statistics of Accidents at Work), the LFS AHMs 2007 and 2013 give the following additional value: providing information about accidents with less than four days of absence from work, as well as more information about the occurrence of road traffic accidents;including information about work-related health problems and risk factors for physical health and mental well-being;enabling the analysis of accidents and work-related health problems by LFS core variables;enabling a comparison of reporting levels between Member States, economic sectors and other variables.
  • R
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The rail accident data are provided to Eurostat by the European Railway Agency (ERA). The ERA manages and is responsible for the entire data collection. The Eurostat data constitute a part of the data collected by ERA and are part of the so-called Common Safety Indicators (CSIs). In Eurobase, the following data are available:Number of rail accidents by type of accidentNumber of rail accident victims by type of accidentNumber of rail accidents involving the transport of dangerous goodsNumber of suicides involving railways.  Rail accident data are also collected in the framework of Regulation (EC) 91/2003 – Annex H: please refer to point 3.4 for more information.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The rail accident data are provided to Eurostat by the European Railway Agency (ERA). The ERA manages and is responsible for the entire data collection. The Eurostat data constitute a part of the data collected by ERA and are part of the so-called Common Safety Indicators (CSIs). In Eurobase, the following data are available:Number of rail accidents by type of accidentNumber of rail accident victims by type of accidentNumber of rail accidents involving the transport of dangerous goodsNumber of suicides involving railways.  Rail accident data are also collected in the framework of Regulation (EC) 91/2003 – Annex H: please refer to point 3.4 for more information.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The rail accident data are provided to Eurostat by the European Railway Agency (ERA). The ERA manages and is responsible for the entire data collection. The Eurostat data constitute a part of the data collected by ERA and are part of the so-called Common Safety Indicators (CSIs). In Eurobase, the following data are available: Number of rail accidents by type of accidentNumber of rail accident victims by type of accidentNumber of rail accidents involving the transport of dangerous goodsNumber of suicides involving railways. Rail accident data are also collected in the framework of Regulation (EC) 91/2003 – Annex H: please refer to point 3.4 for more information.
    • January 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      An ad hoc module on "Work-related health problems and accidental injuries" was included in the 1999 Labour Force Survey (LFS), in order to act as a complementary data source to ESAW (European Statistics on accidents at Work) and EODS (European Occupational Diseases Statistics) and give a broader view on Health and Safety at Work.. This module provided complementary information on accidents occurring at work and resulting in less than 4 days' absence from work, on return to work after the accident at work and on health problems caused or made worse by work. The data refer to self-reported accidental injuries at work during a 12 month period before the survey and to self-reported non-accidental health problems caused or made worse by work and from which the respondent had suffered during a 12 month period before the survey. The indicators used for accidental injuries are the percentage distributions of accidents and the relative incidence rate of accidents (relative to the rate in the total of all participating countries, which is marked with 100). The incidence rate is the number of accidents at work per 100 000 employed workers. The indicators used for non-accidental health problems are the percentage distribution, number, prevalence rate and relative prevalence rate of health problems (relative to the rate in the total of all participating countries, which is marked with 100). The prevalence rate is the number of people suffering from the health problem during the last 12 months per 100 000 employed workers (see the link to summary methodology at the bottom of the page). Statistical adjustments: Because the frequency of work accidents is higher in some branches (high-risk sectors), an adjustment is performed to get more standardised incidence rates. Similarly, the prevalence rates for non-accidental health problems are standardised for economic activity and for age, as age influences importantly the prevalence of health problems. For more details, please see the link to the summary methodology at the bottom of the page. Geographical coverage: Denmark, Germany, Greece, Spain, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Portugal, Finland, Sweden, United Kingdom. Sector coverage: All sectors of economic activity are covered. The specification of sectors is given according to the NACE classification (NACE = Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté européenne). The incidence and prevalence rates are calculated for the total of all branches.
  • S
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW), on the basis of a methodology developed in 1990. The data refer to accidents at work resulting in more than 3 days' absence from work (serious accidents) and fatal accidents. A fatal accident is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The indicators used are the number and incidence rate of serious and fatal accidents at work. The incidence rate of serious accidents at work is the number of persons involved in accidents at work with more than 3 days' absence per 100,000 persons in employment. The incidence rate of fatal accidents at work is the number of persons with fatal accidents at work per 100,000 persons in employment. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the public (Social Security) or private specific insurance for accidents at work, or to other relevant national authority (Labour Inspection, etc.) for countries having a "universal" Social Security system. For the Netherlands only survey data are available for the non-fatal accidents at work (a special module in the national labour force survey). Sector coverage: In general the private sector is covered by all national reporting systems. However some important sectors are not covered by all Member States. The specification of sectors is given according to the NACE classification (NACE = Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté européenne). The incidence rate is calculated for the total of the so-called 9 common branches (See point 3.6). For a structured metadata overview on variables, coverage of sectors and professional status please see also the annex Metadata_overview_2007.Statistical adjustments: Because the frequency of work accidents is higher in some branches (high-risk sectors), an adjustment is performed to get more standardised incidence rates. For more details, please see the summary methodology (link at the bottom of the page). Geographical coverage: For accidents at work, data are available for all old EU-Member States (EU 15) and Norway. The methodology has also been implemented in the New Member States and Switzerland with first data being available for the reference year 2004.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW), on the basis of a methodology developed in 1990. The data refer to accidents at work resulting in more than 3 days' absence from work (serious accidents) and fatal accidents. A fatal accident is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The indicators used are the number and incidence rate of serious and fatal accidents at work. The incidence rate of serious accidents at work is the number of persons involved in accidents at work with more than 3 days' absence per 100,000 persons in employment. The incidence rate of fatal accidents at work is the number of persons with fatal accidents at work per 100,000 persons in employment. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the public (Social Security) or private specific insurance for accidents at work, or to other relevant national authority (Labour Inspection, etc.) for countries having a "universal" Social Security system. For the Netherlands only survey data are available for the non-fatal accidents at work (a special module in the national labour force survey). Sector coverage: In general the private sector is covered by all national reporting systems. However some important sectors are not covered by all Member States. The specification of sectors is given according to the NACE classification (NACE = Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté européenne). The incidence rate is calculated for the total of the so-called 9 common branches (See point 3.6). For a structured metadata overview on variables, coverage of sectors and professional status please see also the annex Metadata_overview_2007.Statistical adjustments: Because the frequency of work accidents is higher in some branches (high-risk sectors), an adjustment is performed to get more standardised incidence rates. For more details, please see the summary methodology (link at the bottom of the page). Geographical coverage: For accidents at work, data are available for all old EU-Member States (EU 15) and Norway. The methodology has also been implemented in the New Member States and Switzerland with first data being available for the reference year 2004.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The harmonised data on accidents at work are collected in the framework of the European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW), on the basis of a methodology developed in 1990. The data refer to accidents at work resulting in more than 3 days' absence from work (serious accidents) and fatal accidents. A fatal accident is defined as an accident which leads to the death of a victim within one year of the accident. The indicators used are the number and incidence rate of serious and fatal accidents at work. The incidence rate of serious accidents at work is the number of persons involved in accidents at work with more than 3 days' absence per 100,000 persons in employment. The incidence rate of fatal accidents at work is the number of persons with fatal accidents at work per 100,000 persons in employment. The national ESAW sources are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the public (Social Security) or private specific insurance for accidents at work, or to other relevant national authority (Labour Inspection, etc.) for countries having a "universal" Social Security system. For the Netherlands only survey data are available for the non-fatal accidents at work (a special module in the national labour force survey). Sector coverage: In general the private sector is covered by all national reporting systems. However some important sectors are not covered by all Member States. The specification of sectors is given according to the NACE classification (NACE = Nomenclature statistique des activités économiques dans la Communauté européenne). The incidence rate is calculated for the total of the so-called 9 common branches (See point 3.6). For a structured metadata overview on variables, coverage of sectors and professional status please see also the annex Metadata_overview_2007.Statistical adjustments: Because the frequency of work accidents is higher in some branches (high-risk sectors), an adjustment is performed to get more standardised incidence rates. For more details, please see the summary methodology (link at the bottom of the page). Geographical coverage: For accidents at work, data are available for all old EU-Member States (EU 15) and Norway. The methodology has also been implemented in the New Member States and Switzerland with first data being available for the reference year 2004.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The rail accident data are provided to Eurostat by the European Railway Agency (ERA). The ERA manages and is responsible for the entire data collection. The Eurostat data constitute a part of the data collected by ERA and are part of the so-called Common Safety Indicators (CSIs). In Eurobase, the following data are available: Number of rail accidents by type of accidentNumber of rail accident victims by type of accidentNumber of rail accidents involving the transport of dangerous goodsNumber of suicides involving railways. Rail accident data are also collected in the framework of Regulation (EC) 91/2003 – Annex H: please refer to point 3.4 for more information.

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