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Eurostat

Eurostat is the statistical office of the European Union situated in Luxembourg. Its task is to provide the European Union with statistics at European level that enable comparisons between countries and regions and to promote the harmonisation of statistical methods across EU member states and candidates for accession as well as EFTA countries.

All datasets:  A B E F G H I L M N O P R S T
  • A
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain covers statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data show entrants and enrolments in education levels, education personnel and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The standards on international statistics on education and training systems are set by the three international organisations jointly administering the annual UOE data collection: the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation Institute for Statistics (UNESCO-UIS),the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and,the Statistical Office of the European Union (EUROSTAT). The following topics are covered: Pupils and students – Enrolments and EntrantsLearning mobilityEducation personnelEducation financeGraduatesLanguage learningData and indicators disseminated include e.g. participation rates at different levels of education,  shares of pupils and students by programme orientation (general/academic and vocational/professional) and in combined school and work-based programmes, enrolments in public and private institutions, tertiary education graduates, degree mobile students enrolled and graduates, pupil-teacher ratios, foreign language learning, expenditure on education per student and relative GDP etc.
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The annual expenditure on public and private educational institutions per pupil/student compared to GDP per capita relates the resources (e.g. expenditure for personnel, other current and capital expenditure) being devoted to education in public and private educational institutions to the overall economic welfare of a country. It is based on full-time equivalent enrolment. The use of GDP per capita allows the comparison of levels of economic activity of different sized economies (per capita) irrespective of their price levels (in PPS).
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Expenditure per pupil/student in public and private institutions measures how much central, regional and local levels of government, private households, religious institutions and firms spent per pupil/student. It includes expenditure for personnel, other current and capital expenditure.
    • November 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2018
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      The total consumption expenditure made by a visitor or on behalf of a visitor for and during his/her trip and stay at destination.
    • November 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data are compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics. With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012). The information on tourism demand concerns trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page). Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for personal purpose during the reference year. Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • November 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The total consumption expenditure made by a visitor or on behalf of a visitor for and during his/her trip and stay at destination.
    • November 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data are compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics. With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012). The information on tourism demand concerns trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page). Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for personal purpose during the reference year. Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
  • B
    • November 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • April 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
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      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
  • E
    • August 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
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      SBS series on Environmental protection expenditure in industry are closely related to other SBS domains for which separate metadata files have been compiled (See 'General Information' in the  annex at the bottom of the page). They cover the NACE Rev 1.1 sections C to F, covering Industry (sections C-E) and Construction (F). Three characteristics on environmental protection expenditure are defined: 21 11 0: Investment in equipment and plant for pollution control and special anti-pollution accessories (mainly 'end-of-pipe' equipment. 21 12 0: Investment in equipment and plant linked to cleaner technologies ('integrated technology') 21 14 0: Total current expenditure on environmental protection. Both tables specify the above characteristics according to NACE Rev1.1 division level. A first table further provides a breakdown according to the environmental domain: protection of ambient air and climate, wastewater management, waste management and other environmental protection measures. The second table further contains a breakdown according to enterprise size in three classes: 1-49, 20-249 and 250+ persons employed
    • May 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 May, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Environmental protection expenditure is the money spent on all purposeful activities directly aimed at the prevention, reduction and elimination of pollution or any other degradation of the environment. It includes environmental investments and environmental current expenditure. Environmental investments are all outlays in a given year for machinery, equipment and land used for environmental protection purposes. Current expenditure for environmental protection includes daily operating activities aiming at the prevention or reduction of pollution. It includes for example expenditure for staff working on environmental issues and materials for environmental protection.
    • May 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 May, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Environmental protection expenditure is the money spent on all purposeful activities directly aimed at the prevention, reduction and elimination of pollution or any other degradation of the environment. It includes environmental investments, environmental current expenditure and environmental subsidies/transfers. Environmental investments are all outlays in a given year for machinery, equipment and land used for environmental protection purposes. Current expenditure for environmental protection includes daily operating activities aiming at the prevention or reduction of pollution. It includes for example expenditure for staff working on environmental issues and materials for environmental protection.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • May 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The total consumption expenditure made by a visitor or on behalf of a visitor for and during his/her trip and stay at destination.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data are compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics. With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012). The information on tourism demand concerns trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page). Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for personal purpose during the reference year. Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data are compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics. With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012). The information on tourism demand concerns trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page). Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for personal purpose during the reference year. Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data are compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics. With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012). The information on tourism demand concerns trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page). Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for personal purpose during the reference year. Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Health care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household). The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP). Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable. The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005. The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Health care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household). The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP). Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable. The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005. The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Health care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household). The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP). Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable. The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005. The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain covers statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data show entrants and enrolments in education levels, education personnel and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The standards on international statistics on education and training systems are set by the three international organisations jointly administering the annual UOE data collection:the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation Institute for Statistics (UNESCO-UIS),the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and,the Statistical Office of the European Union (EUROSTAT). The following topics are covered:Pupils and students – Enrolments and EntrantsLearning mobilityEducation personnelEducation financeGraduatesLanguage learning Data and indicators disseminated include e.g. participation rates at different levels of education,  shares of pupils and students by programme orientation (general/academic and vocational/professional) and in combined school and work-based programmes, enrolments in public and private institutions, tertiary education graduates, degree mobile students enrolled and graduates, pupil-teacher ratios, foreign language learning, expenditure on education per student and relative GDP etc.
    • April 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 April, 2018
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      The indicator is defined as the percentage share of social protection expenditure devoted to old age care in GDP. These expenditures cover care allowance, accommodation, and assistance in carrying out daily tasks.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data are compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics. With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012). The information on tourism demand concerns trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page). Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for personal purpose during the reference year. Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection covers national tourism.  Data is collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and is compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Most of the time, data on domestic and outbound trips (where "outbound tourism" means residents of a country travelling in another country) is collected via sample surveys. However, in a few cases the data is compiled from border surveys. Surveys are generally conducted on a monthly or quarterly basis.   The concepts and definitions used in the collection of data shall conform to the specifications described in the Methodological manual for tourism statistics.   With the entry into force of the Regulation (EU) 692/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council, Member States are transmitting microdata to Eurostat, which enables that data to be disseminated far more widely (since reference period 2012).   The information on tourism demand, concern trips (for the population aged 15 years and over) of which the main purpose is holidays or business and which involve at least one or more consecutive nights spent away from the usual place of residence (See annex at the bottom of the page).   Aggregated data on participation in tourim is also transmitted to Eurostat and covers the resident population aged 15 or over, participating in tourism for for personal purpose during the reference year.   Microdata on trips of EU residents as well as participation data are transmitted to Eurostat one time per year. Data are disseminated when they respect agreed validation rules and other quality criteria.
    • September 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 September, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The ESSPROS domain In Eurostat database, ESSPROS domain, ESSPROS data on expenditure and receipts, data on net social protection benefits as well as data on Pension beneficiaries for the total of schemes are currently disseminated. The qualitative information is available in the dedicated section "Social protection" of the Eurostat website. The release of ESSPROS data, quality reports and the qualitative information is made annually. Among the three main categories of data soruces - administrative data, national accounts and other estimates, surveys/census - most of the countries report administrative data and register-based data as their main data sources. Data on expenditure and receipts correspond to two collections "EXPEND" (Social protection expenditure) and "RECEIPTS" (Social protection receipts). The collection "EXPEND" is composed by three groups: 1. expsum (Expenditure - Summary tables); it contains two summary tables: e sum Expenditure: main results. The data include the expenditure broken down in social benefits, administration cost and other expenditure. In addition, social benefits are classified by functions of social protection. e pens Pensions. The data include the social benefits relating to pensions (old age, disability, survivors and unemployment pensions). In addition the data are split between means-tested and non means-tested benefits. 2. expcur (Expenditure - Tables by functions and aggregated benefits); it contains five tables corresponding to different "currencies": national currencies (e nac), euros (e eur), Purchasing Power Standards (e pps), Purchasing Power Standards per head (e ppsh) and % of the GDP (e gdp). For each table data (social protection benefits) are published: according to the classification by function of social protection: eight functions (Sickness /Health care; Disability; Old age; Survivors; Family/children; Unemployment; Housing; Social exclusion not elsewhere classified) and the total of social benefits;according to the detailed classification of benefits by type - cash benefits and benefits in kind- and by characteristic -split between means-tested and non means-tested benefits.3. expfunc (Expenditure - Tables by benefits and currency); it contains nine tables corresponding to the eight different functions of social protection and one for the total of social benefits. In each table data are published according to the detailed classification of benefits by function, type and characteristic. The collection "RECEIPTS" is composed by two groups: 1. recsum (Receipts - Summary tables); it contains two tables: r sumt Receipts by type. The data include the receipts of social protection broken down in the different types of receipts - social contributions, general government contributions and other receipts. r sums Receipts by sector of origin. The data include the receipts of social protection broken down by the different sectors of origin -corporations, general government, households, non-profit institutions serving households, rest of the world. 2. reccur (Receipts by different "currencies"); it contains three tables: national currencies (r nac), euros (r eur) and % of the GDP (r gdp). For each table data (receipts) are published: according to the classification by types of receipts;according to the classification by sectors of origin.Data on net social protection benefits correspond to the table " spr_net_ben" (Net social protection benefits) in the collection "NET". The ESSPROS module on net social protection benefits (restricted approach) measures net expenditure by collecting information on the average rates of taxes and social contributions paid by recipients of each cash benefit reported in the Core system. These rates are then applied to the gross expenditure on each benefit to obtain a net value as follows: Net social benefits = Gross social benefits * (1 – AITR – AISCR) where AITR / AISCR are the Average itemized tax / social contribution rates. The net social protection benefits are complemented by the value of “Fiscal benefits” provided in the form of tax breaks that would be defined as social protection benefits, if they were provided in cash. Tax breaks promoting the provision of social protection or promoting private insurance plans are excluded. Exceptionally, if some fiscal benefits cannot be taken into account in the assessment of the actual taxes and social contributions paid on social benefits (this happens for few countries), then the value of net benefits should be complemented by the residual value of the fiscal benefit. In this case the formula above becomes: Net social benefits = Gross social benefits * (1 – AITR – AISCR) + Residual fiscal benefits In ESSPROS, fiscal benefits are defined as social protection provided in the form of tax breaks that would be defined as social protection benefits if they were provided in cash, excluding tax breaks promoting the provision of social protection or promoting private insurance plans. According to a 2015 decision of the Working Group on Social Protection Statistics, fiscal benefits in the form of payable tax credits should be included in full (cash component plus fiscal component) in the ESSPROS Core System while all other forms of fiscal benefit are excluded from the Core System and dealt with in the NET modules (the existing restricted approach module and the planned enlarged approach modules). More information is available in the Annex I "Payable tax credits".   Data on pension beneficiaries correspond to the collection "PENS" that contains the table "spr_pns_ben" (Pension Beneficiaries at 31 December of each year). The data include the number of recipients of one or more periodic cash benefits under a social protection scheme falling within seven pension categories grouped into four basic functions. The seven categories of pensions in this module are: Disability pension;Early retirement benefit due to reduced capacity to work;Old-age pension;Anticipated old-age pension;Partial pension;Survivor's pension;Early retirement benefit due to labour market reasons. The four functions of the module are: Disability (grouping the first two categories of pensions above);Old age (grouping the next three);Survivors (the sixth category);Unemployment (the last category). The data, available by gender for the total of schemes, are expressed in "units". Methodological definitions and more details about social protection classifications and breakdowns can be found in the ESSPROS Manual - The European System of integrated Social PROtection Statistics. Annexes:Payable tax credits
  • F
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Data in this domain constitute only a small part of the entire National Accounts data range available from Eurostat. Annual and quarterly national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013. The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information on the transition from ESA 95 to ESA 2010 is presented on the Eurostat website. The annual data of this domain consists of the following collections: 1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side. nama_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income) The quarterly data of this domain consists of the following collections 1. Main GDP aggregates, main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by industry and assets. namq_10_ma: Main GDP aggregatesnamq_10_gdp: GDP and main components (output, expenditure and income)namq_10_fcs: Final consumption aggregates by durabilitynamq_10_exi: Exports and imports by Member States of the EU/third countries 2. Breakdowns of GDP aggregates and employment data by main industries and asset classes. namq_10_bbr: Basic breakdowns main GDP aggregates and employment (by industry and assets)namq_10_a10: Gross value added and income by A*10 industrynamq_10_an6: Gross fixed capital formation by AN_F6 asset typenamq_10_a10_e: Employment by A*10 industry breakdowns Geographical entities covered are the European Union, the euro area, EU Member States, Candidate Countries, EFTA countries, US, Japan and possibly other countries on an ad-hoc basis. Data sources: National Statistical Institutes.
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 October, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent and consistent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. Eurostat publishes annual and quarterly national accounts, annual and quarterly sector accounts as well as supply, use and input-output tables, which are each presented with associated metadata. Even though consistency checks are a major aspect of data validation, temporary (usually limited) inconsistencies between datasets may occur, mainly due to vintage effects. Annual national accounts are compiled in accordance with the European System of Accounts - ESA 2010 as defined in Annex B of the Council Regulation (EU) No 549/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 May 2013.   The previous European System of Accounts, ESA95, was reviewed to bring national accounts in the European Union, in line with new economic environment, advances in methodological research and needs of users and the updated national accounts framework at the international level, the SNA 2008. The revisions are reflected in an updated Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the European system of national and regional accounts in the European Union of 2010 (ESA 2010). The associated transmission programme is also updated and data transmissions in accordance with ESA 2010 are compulsory from September 2014 onwards. Further information (including actual communications) is presented on the Eurostat website. The domain consists of the following collections:   1. Main GDP aggregates: main components from the output, expenditure and income side, expenditure breakdowns by durability and exports and imports by origin.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The deflated house price index (or real house price index) is the ratio between the house price index (HPI) and the national accounts deflator for private final consumption expenditure (households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs)). This indicator therefore measures inflation in the house market relative to inflation in the final consumption expenditure of households and NPIs. Eurostat HPI captures price changes of all residential properties purchased by households (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.), both new and existing, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered, self-build dwellings are therefore excluded. The land component is included. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the year-on-year growth rate of the deflated house price index. In the MIP domain are also published annual and quarterly figures on: House price index, deflated – average index and rate of changeHouse price index – average rate of change, index and % change T/T-3
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The deflated house price index (or real house price index) is the ratio between the house price index (HPI) and the national accounts deflator for private final consumption expenditure (households and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs)). This indicator therefore measures inflation in the house market relative to inflation in the final consumption expenditure of households and NPIs. Eurostat HPI captures price changes of all residential properties purchased by households (flats, detached houses, terraced houses, etc.), both new and existing, independently of their final use and their previous owners. Only market prices are considered, self-build dwellings are therefore excluded. The land component is included. The MIP scoreboard indicator is the year-on-year growth rate of the deflated house price index. In the MIP domain are also published annual and quarterly figures on:House price index, deflated – average index and rate of changeHouse price index – average rate of change, index and % change T/T-3
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 October, 2016
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  • G
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Indicator refer to general government total expenditure on administration, operation or support of administrative, civil and criminal law courts and the judicial system, including enforcement of fines and legal settlements imposed by the courts and operation of parole probation systems, and parts of legal aid, i.e. legal representation and advice on behalf of government or on behalf of others provided by government in cash or in services, excluding prison administrations.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This table presents the relative shares of the different sources of funds in R&D. More specifically the indicators provided are percentage of GERD (Gross domestic expenditure on R&D) financed respectively by industry, government, the higher education and the private non profit sector. The fifth source of funds shown, which also make the breakdown complete, is GERD financed from abroad. R&D is an activity where there are significant transfers of resources between units, organisations, sectors and countries. The importance of the source of funding has been recognized in one of the Barcelona targets of the Lisbon agenda where it is said that the appropriate split for R&D is 1/3 financed by public funds and 2/3 by private.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2019
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      The research and experimental development (R&D) comprise creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications (Frascati Manual, 2002 edition, § 63 ). The GDP used in denominator of the MIP indicator comes from the ESA 2010 transmission programme.
  • H
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Health care expenditure quantifies the economic resources dedicated to health functions, excluding capital investment. Healthcare expenditure concerns itself primarily with healthcare goods and services that are consumed by resident units, irrespective of where that consumption takes place (it may be in the rest of the world) or who is paying for it. As such, exports of healthcare goods and services (to non-resident units) are excluded, whereas imports of healthcare goods and services for final use are included. Health care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing scheme (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Health care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household). The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP). Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable. The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005. The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Health care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household). The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP). Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable. The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005. The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Annual data on Household Final Consumption Expenditure broken down by COICOP-HBS (2003) categories and by certain cross-sectional variables. The main purpose of this survey at national level is to update the weights of the basket of goods and services used for the calculation of the HICP. However it may also be used for many other purposes either at national or European level: economic studies, social analyses, market research… Presented data are: mean consumption expenditure of private households; structure of mean consumption expenditure and household characteristics. Household final consumption expenditure is measured in national currency, Euro and PPS (purchasing power standard). HBS data are collected via the National HBS surveys in each participating country. Data collection involves a combination of one or more interviews and diaries or logs maintained by households and/or individuals, generally on a daily basis.    Data collection is approximately every 5 years: 1988, 1994, 1999, 2005 and 2010. Next reference year is 2015.
  • I
    • November 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The collection of 'Telecommunication Services' statistics covers the following indicators: (1) Employment in telecommunication The indicator gives the total number of people employed in telecommunication services and the number of people employed in fixed and mobile telecommunication and Internet service provision. Employment is converted into full time equivalent units, average of the year. (2) Investment The indicator gives the total gross investment (in Mio euro) in tangible goods i.e. investment for acquiring property (land and buildings) and plant (e.g. switching equipment, transmission equipment, office machinery, and motor vehicles), and investment in fixed telecommunication networks (excluding cable TV services), mobile telecommunications: GSM and GPRS, mobile telecommunications: UMTS (excluding licenses), and in other telecommunication networks (Internet, satellite and cable telecommunication equipment and infrastructure other than for broadcasting). (3) Turnover The indicator gives the total turnover (in Mio euro) from all telecommunication services and turnover from leased lines, fixed network services, cellular mobile telecommunication services, interconnection services and Internet service provision. (4) International receipts and payments The indicator gives the total revenue (receipts, payments) from international incoming and outgoing telecommunication traffic, in Mio euro. Incoming telecommunication traffic: income received from foreign telephone operators for completing calls originating in foreign country. Outgoing telecommunication traffic: charges received from subscribers for placing outgoing calls after deduction of the share of this income to be paid to other organisation for outgoing telecommunication traffic (operators of the incoming and possibly transit countries). (5) International calls The indicator gives the amount (in 1000 minutes) of international incoming (originating outside the country with a destination inside the country) and outgoing (originating inside the country to destinations outside the country) calls in fixed and cellular networks. (6) Traffic The indicator gives the total amount of national calls and the amount of local calls, national long distance calls, cellular mobile calls, minutes of internet connection, calls from fixed to mobile and mobile to fixed networks, calls within mobile networks and calls from mobile to mobile networks (in 1000 minutes). (7) SMS (short message service) The indicator gives the total number of SMS (text messages) sent (in thousands). (8) Access to networks (in thousands) The indicator gives the number of main telephone lines and subscriptions to the services of the operators offering mobile telecommunication services and the number of leased lines, ISDN subscriptions, DSL subscriptions, Internet subscriptions and subscriptions to cable networks enabling internet use, number of connections to telecommunication networks through electricity networks (Power Line Communication - PLC), subscriptions to mobile telecommunication systems enabling use of UMTS and the number of users of Voice over Internet Protocol telephony, in thousands. (9) Access to networks (per 100 inhabitants) The indicator gives the number of main telephone lines and subscriptions to the services of the operators offering mobile telecommunication services per 100 inhabitants. (10) Household share of main telephone lines The indicator gives the share of main telephone lines for residential use (i.e. lines which are not used for business, government or other professional purposes or as public telephone stations) as a percentage of total main telephone lines. (11) Operators and service providers The indicator gives the number of fixed network operators offering local and long distance national telecommunications (facilities based or resale) and international telecommunications, and the number of cellular mobile operators (digital or analogous, facilities based or resale), cable and satellite service providers (excluding pure programme distribution) and internet service providers (access and backbone services). (12) Broadband penetration rate  This indicator shows how widely broadband access to the internet has spread in the countries on the general level, not specifying by user group. (13) Prices of telecommunication The indicator gives the price in Euro of a 10 minute call at 11 am on a weekday (including VAT) for a local call (3km), national long distance call (200km) and an international call (to USA). The prices refer to the month of August for the period 1998-2005, and to the month of September from 2006 onwards. Tariffs without special rates are used. (14) Market shares in telecommunication This covers two structural indicators: market share of the incumbent in fixed telecommunications by type of call (local, long distance and international calls) and market share of the leading operator in mobile telecommunications. (15) Information technology expenditure in millions of euro and as a percentage of GDP Data refer to the expenditure for information and communication technology in millions of euro and as a percentage of GDP, with breakdown by expenditure for telecommunications and IT expenditure. Data in millions of euro are coming from the annual report of the European Information Technology Observatory (EITO).
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 April, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • July 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • September 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The data in this dataset comes from the Common Questionnaire for Transport Statistics, developed and surveyed in co-operation between the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), the International Transport Forum (ITF) and Eurostat. The Common Questionnaire is not supported by a legal act, but is based on a gentlemen's agreement with the participating countries; the completeness varies from country to country. Eurostat’s datasets based on the Common Questionnaire cover annual data for the EU Member States, EFTA states and Candidate countries to the EU. Data for other participating countries are available through the ITF and the UNECE. In total, comparable transport data collected through the Common Questionnaire is available for close to 60 countries worldwide. The Common Questionnaire collects aggregated annual data on:Railway transportRoad transportInland waterways transportOil pipelines transportGas pipelines transport For each mode of transport, the Common Questionnaire cover some or all of the following sub-modules (the number of questions/variables within each sub-module varies between the different modes of transport):Infrastructure (All modes)Transport equipment (RAIL, ROAD and INLAND WATERWAYS)Enterprises, economic performance and employment (All modes)Traffic (RAIL, ROAD and INLAND WATERWAYS)Transport measurement (All modes)Accidents (ROAD only) The Common Questionnaire is completed by the competent national authorities. The responsibility for completing specific modules (e.g. Transport by Rail) or part of modules (e.g. Road Infrastructure) may be delegated to other national authorities in charge of specific fields.
  • L
    • August 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 August, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The labour market policy (LMP) database was developed and maintained by Eurostat till 2013. From 2014, the LMP database is developed and maintained by European Commission's Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion and LMP data are disseminated by Eurostat. European Commission's LMP database provides information on labour market interventions, which are government actions to help and support the unemployed and other disadvantaged groups in the transition from unemployment or inactivity to work. The scope of the LMP database is limited to interventions that are explicitly targeted at groups of persons with difficulties in the labour market: the unemployed, persons employed but at risk of involuntary job loss and persons currently considered as inactive persons but who would like to enter the labour market. LMP statistics are one of the data sources for monitoring the Employment Guidelines (part II of the Europe 2020 Integrated Guidelines) through the Europe 2020 Joint Assessment Framework (JAF). The guidelines specifically refer to the provision of active labour market policies, which cover LMP measures and LMP services, and adequate social security systems, which include LMP supports. The unit of observation in the LMP database is the labour market intervention and data on the expenditure and participants for each intervention are collected annually from administrative sources in each country. The database also collects extensive qualitative information that describes each intervention, how it works, the main target groups, etc. LMP interventions are classified by type of action into three broad types – services, measures and supports – and into 9 detailed categories (see 3.2 Classification system). The LMP database covers all EU Member States and Norway. Data for the EU-15 countries and Norway are available from 1998 whilst the more recently acceded EU countries started providing data at different times from 2003 onwards. The following data and metadata are available: Summary tables of expenditure and participants by type of action For each country: detailed tables of expenditure and participants by intervention LMP based indicators for monitoring the Employment Guidelines (for definitions see annexes below) Reference data on persons registered with Public Employment Services (PES) Qualitative reports describing the interventions in each country
  • M
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat's sport statistics reflect the multidisciplinary nature of sport. The data are derived from already existing EU surveys, as there has been so far no specific data collection devoted only to sport at EU level. Data on private expenditure on sport relate to households' expenditure on sporting goods and services. Those data are complemented by EU-28 harmonised indices of consumer prices (HICP) for main sporting goods and services (2005 = 100) Household expenditure statistics on sporting goods and services provide an overview of the consumption patterns of households and assess the weight of private expenditure on sporting goods relative to the total household expenditure. These statistics are extracted and then compiled from the 2010 Household budget survey (HBS). As private expenditure is influenced, among the others, by the prices level and structure,  data on private expenditure on sporting goods and services can be completed by statistical information on the Harmonised Indices of Consumer Prices (HICP).
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Annual data on Household Final Consumption Expenditure broken down by COICOP-HBS (2003) categories and by certain cross-sectional variables. The main purpose of this survey at national level is to update the weights of the basket of goods and services used for the calculation of the HICP. However it may also be used for many other purposes either at national or European level: economic studies, social analyses, market research… Presented data are: mean consumption expenditure of private households; structure of mean consumption expenditure and household characteristics. Household final consumption expenditure is measured in national currency, Euro and PPS (purchasing power standard). HBS data are collected via the National HBS surveys in each participating country. Data collection involves a combination of one or more interviews and diaries or logs maintained by households and/or individuals, generally on a daily basis.    Data collection is approximately every 5 years: 1988, 1994, 1999, 2005 and 2010. Next reference year is 2015.
  • N
    • February 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The data in this dataset comes from the Common Questionnaire for Transport Statistics, developed and surveyed in co-operation between the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), the International Transport Forum (ITF) and Eurostat. The Common Questionnaire is not supported by a legal act, but is based on a gentlemen's agreement with the participating countries; the completeness varies from country to country. Eurostat’s datasets based on the Common Questionnaire cover annual data for the EU Member States, EFTA states and Candidate countries to the EU. Data for other participating countries are available through the ITF and the UNECE. In total, comparable transport data collected through the Common Questionnaire is available for close to 60 countries worldwide. The Common Questionnaire collects aggregated annual data on:Railway transportRoad transportInland waterways transportOil pipelines transportGas pipelines transport For each mode of transport, the Common Questionnaire cover some or all of the following sub-modules (the number of questions/variables within each sub-module varies between the different modes of transport):Infrastructure (All modes)Transport equipment (RAIL, ROAD and INLAND WATERWAYS)Enterprises, economic performance and employment (All modes)Traffic (RAIL, ROAD and INLAND WATERWAYS)Transport measurement (All modes) Accidents (ROAD only) The Common Questionnaire is completed by the competent national authorities. The responsibility for completing specific modules (e.g. Transport by Rail) or part of modules (e.g. Road Infrastructure) may be delegated to other national authorities in charge of specific fields.
  • O
    • September 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Other expenditure consists of miscellaneous expenditure (payment of property income and other). Expenditure on social protection contain: social benefits (transfers, in cash or in kind, by social protection schemes to households and individuals to relieve them of the burden of a defined set of risks or needs); administration costs, which represent the costs charged to the scheme for its management and administration; other expenditure.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Household out-of-pocket payment’ means a direct payment for healthcare goods and services from the household primary income or savings, where the payment is made by the user at the time of the purchase of goods or the use of the services. Data are collected according to Commission Regulation (EC) 2015/359 as regards statistics on healthcare expenditure and financing (System of Health Accounts 2011 manual).
  • P
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain covers statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data show entrants and enrolments in education levels, education personnel and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The standards on international statistics on education and training systems are set by the three international organisations jointly administering the annual UOE data collection:the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation Institute for Statistics (UNESCO-UIS),the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and,the Statistical Office of the European Union (EUROSTAT). The following topics are covered:Pupils and students – Enrolments and EntrantsLearning mobilityEducation personnelEducation financeGraduatesLanguage learning Data and indicators disseminated include e.g. participation rates at different levels of education,  shares of pupils and students by programme orientation (general/academic and vocational/professional) and in combined school and work-based programmes, enrolments in public and private institutions, tertiary education graduates, degree mobile students enrolled and graduates, pupil-teacher ratios, foreign language learning, expenditure on education per student and relative GDP etc.
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Expenditure on educational institutions from private sources comprises school fees; materials such as textbooks and teaching equipment; transport to school (if organised by the school); meals (if provided by the school); boarding fees; and expenditure by employers on initial vocational training.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain covers statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data show entrants and enrolments in education levels, education personnel and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The standards on international statistics on education and training systems are set by the three international organisations jointly administering the annual UOE data collection:the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation Institute for Statistics (UNESCO-UIS),the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and,the Statistical Office of the European Union (EUROSTAT). The following topics are covered:Pupils and students – Enrolments and EntrantsLearning mobilityEducation personnelEducation financeGraduatesLanguage learning   Data and indicators disseminated include e.g. participation rates at different levels of education,  shares of pupils and students by programme orientation (general/academic and vocational/professional) and in combined school and work-based programmes, enrolments in public and private institutions, tertiary education graduates, degree mobile students enrolled and graduates, pupil-teacher ratios, foreign language learning, expenditure on education per student and relative GDP etc.
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      18.1. Source data
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The labour market policy (LMP) database was developed and maintained by Eurostat till 2013. From 2014, the LMP database is developed and maintained by European Commission's Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion and LMP data are disseminated by Eurostat. European Commission's LMP database provides information on labour market interventions, which are government actions to help and support the unemployed and other disadvantaged groups in the transition from unemployment or inactivity to work. The scope of the LMP database is limited to interventions that are explicitly targeted at groups of persons with difficulties in the labour market: the unemployed, persons employed but at risk of involuntary job loss and persons currently considered as inactive persons but who would like to enter the labour market. LMP statistics are one of the data sources for monitoring the Employment Guidelines (part II of the Europe 2020 Integrated Guidelines) through the Europe 2020 Joint Assessment Framework (JAF). The guidelines specifically refer to the provision of active labour market policies, which cover LMP measures and LMP services, and adequate social security systems, which include LMP supports. The unit of observation in the LMP database is the labour market intervention and data on the expenditure and participants for each intervention are collected annually from administrative sources in each country. The database also collects extensive qualitative information that describes each intervention, how it works, the main target groups, etc. LMP interventions are classified by type of action into three broad types – services, measures and supports – and into 9 detailed categories (see 3.2 Classification system). The LMP database covers all EU Member States and Norway. Data for the EU-15 countries and Norway are available from 1998 whilst the more recently acceded EU countries started providing data at different times from 2003 onwards. The following data and metadata are available: Summary tables of expenditure and participants by type of actionFor each country: detailed tables of expenditure and participants by interventionLMP based indicators for monitoring the Employment Guidelines (for definitions see annexes below)Reference data on persons registered with Public Employment Services (PES)Qualitative reports describing the interventions in each country
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The labour market policy (LMP) database was developed and maintained by Eurostat till 2013. From 2014, the LMP database is developed and maintained by European Commission's Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion and LMP data are disseminated by Eurostat. European Commission's LMP database provides information on labour market interventions, which are government actions to help and support the unemployed and other disadvantaged groups in the transition from unemployment or inactivity to work. The scope of the LMP database is limited to interventions that are explicitly targeted at groups of persons with difficulties in the labour market: the unemployed, persons employed but at risk of involuntary job loss and persons currently considered as inactive persons but who would like to enter the labour market. LMP statistics are one of the data sources for monitoring the Employment Guidelines (part II of the Europe 2020 Integrated Guidelines) through the Europe 2020 Joint Assessment Framework (JAF). The guidelines specifically refer to the provision of active labour market policies, which cover LMP measures and LMP services, and adequate social security systems, which include LMP supports. The unit of observation in the LMP database is the labour market intervention and data on the expenditure and participants for each intervention are collected annually from administrative sources in each country. The database also collects extensive qualitative information that describes each intervention, how it works, the main target groups, etc. LMP interventions are classified by type of action into three broad types – services, measures and supports – and into 9 detailed categories (see 3.2 Classification system). The LMP database covers all EU Member States and Norway. Data for the EU-15 countries and Norway are available from 1998 whilst the more recently acceded EU countries started providing data at different times from 2003 onwards. The following data and metadata are available: Summary tables of expenditure and participants by type of actionFor each country: detailed tables of expenditure and participants by interventionLMP based indicators for monitoring the Employment Guidelines (for definitions see annexes below)Reference data on persons registered with Public Employment Services (PES)Qualitative reports describing the interventions in each country
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The labour market policy (LMP) database was developed and maintained by Eurostat till 2013. From 2014, the LMP database is developed and maintained by European Commission's Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion and LMP data are disseminated by Eurostat. European Commission's LMP database provides information on labour market interventions, which are government actions to help and support the unemployed and other disadvantaged groups in the transition from unemployment or inactivity to work. The scope of the LMP database is limited to interventions that are explicitly targeted at groups of persons with difficulties in the labour market: the unemployed, persons employed but at risk of involuntary job loss and persons currently considered as inactive persons but who would like to enter the labour market. LMP statistics are one of the data sources for monitoring the Employment Guidelines (part II of the Europe 2020 Integrated Guidelines) through the Europe 2020 Joint Assessment Framework (JAF). The guidelines specifically refer to the provision of active labour market policies, which cover LMP measures and LMP services, and adequate social security systems, which include LMP supports. The unit of observation in the LMP database is the labour market intervention and data on the expenditure and participants for each intervention are collected annually from administrative sources in each country. The database also collects extensive qualitative information that describes each intervention, how it works, the main target groups, etc. LMP interventions are classified by type of action into three broad types – services, measures and supports – and into 9 detailed categories (see 3.2 Classification system). The LMP database covers all EU Member States and Norway. Data for the EU-15 countries and Norway are available from 1998 whilst the more recently acceded EU countries started providing data at different times from 2003 onwards. The following data and metadata are available: Summary tables of expenditure and participants by type of actionFor each country: detailed tables of expenditure and participants by interventionLMP based indicators for monitoring the Employment Guidelines (for definitions see annexes below)Reference data on persons registered with Public Employment Services (PES)Qualitative reports describing the interventions in each country
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Purchasing power parities (PPPs) are indicators of price level differences across countries. PPPs tell us how many currency units a given quantity of goods and services costs in different countries. PPPs can thus be used as currency conversion rates to convert expenditures expressed in national currencies into an artificial common currency (the Purchasing Power Standard, PPS), eliminating the effect of price level differences across countries. The main use of PPPs is to convert national accounts aggregates, like the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of different countries, into comparable volume aggregates. Applying nominal exchange rates in this process would overestimate the GDP of countries with high price levels relative to countries with low price levels. The use of PPPs ensures that the GDP of all countries is valued at a uniform price level and thus reflects only differences in the actual volume of the economy. PPPs are also applied in analyses of relative price levels across countries. For this purpose, the PPPs are divided by the current nominal exchange rate to obtain a price level index (PLI) which expresses the price level of a given country relative to another, or relative to a group of countries like the EU Member States. The production of PPPs is a multilateral exercise involving the National Statistical Institutes of the participating countries, Eurostat and the OECD. Indicators in Eurostat's dissemination database The indicators published in the price domain on Eurostat's website are the following: Purchasing power parities (PPPs) scaled to the sum of expenditures of the EU Member States expressed in euro. This means that the PPP of one particular country indicates how many units of national currency one would need in that country in order to maintain the purchasing power of one euro in the EUPrice level indices (PLIs) as defined aboveNominal expenditure in national currency, as extracted from each country's national accountsNominal expenditure as percentage of GDPNominal expenditure in euroNominal expenditure per inhabitant in euroReal expenditure, defined as nominal expenditure divided by the PPPReal expenditure per inhabitantVolume indices of real expenditure per inhabitantThe convergence indicators, defined as the coefficient of variation of the price level indices (PLIs) and per capita volume indices (VIs) of gross domestic product (GDP), actual individual consumption (AIC) and household final consumption expenditure (HFCE). It measures the price and volume convergence across countries. In addition, PPPs and real expenditures are available from the national accounts domain of the database. For further details, cf. 17.1.
  • R
    • February 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The objective of these data is to provide information for benchmarking and monitoring developments in ICT sector. ICT sector statistics is used largely in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) via the Digital Agenda Scoreboard to monitor progress of the European digital economy according to the objectives set out in the Digital Agenda for Europe, a Europe 2020 Initiative. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. ICT sector indicators are compiled using the secondary statistical analysis. This approach has a virtue of ensuring cost-efficient and high-quality data collection. At the same time, this approach has limited options for designing new indicators, as well as for control over data quality and over data release timing. Data from the Structural Business Statistics (SBS), National Accounts (NA) and Research and Development (R&D) Statistics sections of the Eurostat database are used. For this reason, Metadata guidelines on SBS, on NA and on R&D Statistics are applicable to the data that has been extracted from the respective primary statistics sources. Representation ICT sector statistics contains five indicators in the country/year dimensions, which are updated on an annual basis: (1) Share of the ICT sector in GDP (2) Share of the ICT sector personnel in total employment (3) Growth of the ICT sector value added (4) Share of the ICT sector in the R&D expenditure of businesses (5) Share of the ICT sector in R&D personnel In tables (1)-(3), data for NACE economic activity codes is grouped into three aggregates: ICT sector - total,ICT manufacturingICT Services. Tables (4) and (5) report disaggregated NACE economic activities. Definition ICT sector, ICT manufacturing and ICT services are defined according to the OECD official definition (see OECD, 2011 for details). The 2002 OECD definition in terms of NACE Rev. 1.1 is used on data prior to 2009, while the 2006 OECD definition in terms of NACE Rev. 2 is applied to the data from 2009 onwards. Since the impact of the break in series related to the revision of NACE is minimised due to the compatibility between the two OECD ICT sector definitions, data for each of the indicators (1)-(3) is presented in respective single tables, and not in separate tables for each revision of NACE (as it is done in the source SBS and NA data). Data for the indicators (4) and (5) is based on the NACE Rev. 2 codes of economic activity, with the data for the years prior to 2009 being recalculated using the official correspondence tables between NACE Rev. 2 and NAVE Rev. 1.1. Time coverage Data covers all years starting from 2000 until the latest year available. Following the approach set by the source primary statistics data files, the publication year is calculated as (t+1), with t being the reference year. Data for the indicators (1)-(5) are updated yearly from 2008 until the latest year available (as opposed to simply adding one additional year) to incorporate the latest revisions made on the source data (SBS, NA and R&D statistics). Data prior to 2008 is left unchanged following the approach used in the source data domains.
    • February 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • March 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 March, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Data are derived from the Eurostat R statistics (table: rd_e_berdind). Until 2009, definition of the ICT sector is based on NACE Rev. 1.1 classification as follows: ICT_TOT - ICT Total (30 + 313 + 32 + 332 + 333 + 5184 + 5186 + 642 + 72) ICT_M - ICT Manufacturing (30 + 313 + 32 + 332 + 333) ICT_S - ICT Services (5184 + 5186 + 642 + 72) Data are available for the following classes: 30, 313, 32, 332, 333, 642, 72.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Research and experimental development (R&D) comprise creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications. R&D expenditures include all expenditures for R&D performed within the business enterprise sector (BERD) on the national territory during a given period, regardless of the source of funds. R&D expenditure in BERD are shown as a percentage of GDP (R&D intensity).
  • S
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Annual data on Household Final Consumption Expenditure broken down by COICOP-HBS (2003) categories and by certain cross-sectional variables. The main purpose of this survey at national level is to update the weights of the basket of goods and services used for the calculation of the HICP. However it may also be used for many other purposes either at national or European level: economic studies, social analyses, market research… Presented data are: mean consumption expenditure of private households; structure of mean consumption expenditure and household characteristics. Household final consumption expenditure is measured in national currency, Euro and PPS (purchasing power standard). HBS data are collected via the National HBS surveys in each participating country. Data collection involves a combination of one or more interviews and diaries or logs maintained by households and/or individuals, generally on a daily basis.    Data collection is approximately every 5 years: 1988, 1994, 1999, 2005 and 2010. Next reference year is 2015.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Annual data on Household Final Consumption Expenditure broken down by COICOP-HBS (2003) categories and by certain cross-sectional variables. The main purpose of this survey at national level is to update the weights of the basket of goods and services used for the calculation of the HICP. However it may also be used for many other purposes either at national or European level: economic studies, social analyses, market research… Presented data are: mean consumption expenditure of private households; structure of mean consumption expenditure and household characteristics. Household final consumption expenditure is measured in national currency, Euro and PPS (purchasing power standard). HBS data are collected via the National HBS surveys in each participating country. Data collection involves a combination of one or more interviews and diaries or logs maintained by households and/or individuals, generally on a daily basis.    Data collection is approximately every 5 years: 1988, 1994, 1999, 2005 and 2010. Next reference year is 2015.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Annual data on Household Final Consumption Expenditure broken down by COICOP-HBS (2003) categories and by certain cross-sectional variables. The main purpose of this survey at national level is to update the weights of the basket of goods and services used for the calculation of the HICP. However it may also be used for many other purposes either at national or European level: economic studies, social analyses, market research… Presented data are: mean consumption expenditure of private households; structure of mean consumption expenditure and household characteristics. Household final consumption expenditure is measured in national currency, Euro and PPS (purchasing power standard). HBS data are collected via the National HBS surveys in each participating country. Data collection involves a combination of one or more interviews and diaries or logs maintained by households and/or individuals, generally on a daily basis.    Data collection is approximately every 5 years: 1988, 1994, 1999, 2005 and 2010. Next reference year is 2015.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Annual data on Household Final Consumption Expenditure broken down by COICOP-HBS (2003) categories and by certain cross-sectional variables. The main purpose of this survey at national level is to update the weights of the basket of goods and services used for the calculation of the HICP. However it may also be used for many other purposes either at national or European level: economic studies, social analyses, market research… Presented data are: mean consumption expenditure of private households; structure of mean consumption expenditure and household characteristics. Household final consumption expenditure is measured in national currency, Euro and PPS (purchasing power standard). HBS data are collected via the National HBS surveys in each participating country. Data collection involves a combination of one or more interviews and diaries or logs maintained by households and/or individuals, generally on a daily basis.    Data collection is approximately every 5 years: 1988, 1994, 1999, 2005 and 2010. Next reference year is 2015.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Annual data on Household Final Consumption Expenditure broken down by COICOP-HBS (2003) categories and by certain cross-sectional variables. The main purpose of this survey at national level is to update the weights of the basket of goods and services used for the calculation of the HICP. However it may also be used for many other purposes either at national or European level: economic studies, social analyses, market research… Presented data are: mean consumption expenditure of private households; structure of mean consumption expenditure and household characteristics. Household final consumption expenditure is measured in national currency, Euro and PPS (purchasing power standard). HBS data are collected via the National HBS surveys in each participating country. Data collection involves a combination of one or more interviews and diaries or logs maintained by households and/or individuals, generally on a daily basis.    Data collection is approximately every 5 years: 1988, 1994, 1999, 2005 and 2010. Next reference year is 2015.
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Annual data on Household Final Consumption Expenditure broken down by COICOP-HBS (2003) categories and by certain cross-sectional variables. The main purpose of this survey at national level is to update the weights of the basket of goods and services used for the calculation of the HICP. However it may also be used for many other purposes either at national or European level: economic studies, social analyses, market research… Presented data are: mean consumption expenditure of private households; structure of mean consumption expenditure and household characteristics. Household final consumption expenditure is measured in national currency, Euro and PPS (purchasing power standard). HBS data are collected via the National HBS surveys in each participating country. Data collection involves a combination of one or more interviews and diaries or logs maintained by households and/or individuals, generally on a daily basis.    Data collection is approximately every 5 years: 1988, 1994, 1999, 2005 and 2010. Next reference year is 2015.
  • T
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain covers statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data show entrants and enrolments in education levels, education personnel and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The standards on international statistics on education and training systems are set by the three international organisations jointly administering the annual UOE data collection:the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation Institute for Statistics (UNESCO-UIS),the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and,the Statistical Office of the European Union (EUROSTAT). The following topics are covered:Pupils and students – Enrolments and EntrantsLearning mobilityEducation personnelEducation financeGraduatesLanguage learning   Data and indicators disseminated include e.g. participation rates at different levels of education,  shares of pupils and students by programme orientation (general/academic and vocational/professional) and in combined school and work-based programmes, enrolments in public and private institutions, tertiary education graduates, degree mobile students enrolled and graduates, pupil-teacher ratios, foreign language learning, expenditure on education per student and relative GDP etc.
    • September 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Administration costs represent the costs charged to the scheme for its management and administration. Expenditure on social protection contain: social benefits, which consist of transfers, in cash or in kind, to households and individuals to relieve them of the burden of a defined set of risks or needs; administration costs; other expenditure, which consists of miscellaneous expenditure (payment of property income and other).
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Research and experimental development (R) comprise creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications (Frascati Manual, 2002 edition, § 63 ). R intensity (R expenditures as a percentage of GDP) is an indicator of high political importance at the EU, national and regional levels.
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • May 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB) Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This domain covers statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data show entrants and enrolments in education levels, education personnel and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The standards on international statistics on education and training systems are set by the three international organisations jointly administering the annual UOE data collection:the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation Institute for Statistics (UNESCO-UIS),the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and,the Statistical Office of the European Union (EUROSTAT). The following topics are covered:Pupils and students – Enrolments and EntrantsLearning mobilityEducation personnelEducation financeGraduatesLanguage learning   Data and indicators disseminated include e.g. participation rates at different levels of education,  shares of pupils and students by programme orientation (general/academic and vocational/professional) and in combined school and work-based programmes, enrolments in public and private institutions, tertiary education graduates, degree mobile students enrolled and graduates, pupil-teacher ratios, foreign language learning, expenditure on education per student and relative GDP etc.
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The indicator provided is GERD (Gross domestic expenditure on R&D) as a percentage of GDP. "Research and experimental development (R&D) comprise creative work undertaken on a systematic basis in order to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of man, culture and society and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications" (Frascati Manual, 2002 edition, § 63 ). Gross domestic expenditure on R&D (GERD): Total gross domestic expenditure on research and experimental development (GERD) as a percentage of gross domestic product (GDP).
    • June 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This collection provides users with data concerning R&D expenditure and R&D personnel broken down by following institutional sectors: business enterprise (BES), government (GOV), higher education (HES), private non-profit (PNP) with the total of sectors. All data are broken down by the above mentioned sectors of performance. The R&D expenditure is further broken down by source of funds, by type of costs, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2), by size class, by type of R&D, by fields of science, by socio-economic objectives and by regions (NUTS 2 level). Besides R&D expenditures in basic unit National currency (MIO_NAC) the following units are available: Euro (MIO_EUR), Euro per inhabitant (EUR_HAB), Purchasing Power Standard (MIO_PPS), Purchasing Power Standard at 2005 prices (MIO_PPS_KP05), Purchasing Power Standard per inhabitant at constant 2005 prices (PPS_KP05_HAB), Percentage of GDP (PC_GDP) and Percentage of total R&D expenditure (PC_TOT - for the breakdown by source of funds). R&D personnel data is available in full-time equivalent (FTE), in head count (HC), as a % of employment and as a % of labour force. The data is further broken down by occupation, by qualification, by gender, by size class, by citizenship, by age groups, by fields of science, by economic activity (NACE Rev.2) and by regions (NUTS 2 level). The periodicity of R&D data is biennial except for the key R&D indicators (R&D expenditure, R&D personnel and Researchers by sectors of performance) which are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 2003 onwards. Some other breakdowns of the data may appear on annual basis based on voluntary data provisions. The data are collected through sample or census surveys, from administrative registers or through a combination of sources. R&D data are available for following countries and country groups: - All EU Member States, plus Candidate Countries, EFTA Countries, the Russian Federation, China, Japan, the United States and South Korea. - Country groups: EU-28, EU-15 and EA-18. R&D data are compiled in accordance to the guidelines laid down in the Proposed standard practice for surveys of research and experimental development - Frascati Manual (FM), OECD, 2002 .

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