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Eurostat

Eurostat is the statistical office of the European Union situated in Luxembourg. Its task is to provide the European Union with statistics at European level that enable comparisons between countries and regions and to promote the harmonisation of statistical methods across EU member states and candidates for accession as well as EFTA countries.

All datasets:  B C E G H I L N O P R S T W
  • B
    • June 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • April 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • September 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
  • C
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
  • E
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • August 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • September 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 September, 2019
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE) at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors in Annex 2 and 3. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created, named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions in Annex 7 and 8. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. For more details, see definition of high-tech products in Annex 4 and 5. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents in Annex 6. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • December 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • September 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
  • G
    • November 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • H
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • June 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • I
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • July 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • September 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • June 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • October 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • October 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • April 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patentsare defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • September 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • L
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • N
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • O
    • June 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • December 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • P
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • October 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • June 2011
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 May, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey about innovation activities in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as objectives, sources of information, public funding or expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broken down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2014 concepts and its underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual (2005) 3rd edition (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2014 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation defines the mandatory target population of the survey referring to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2012-2014, but some use only one calendar year (2012 or 2014). CIS 2014 includes an ad-hoc module on innovations with environmental benefits. While European innovation statistics use aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be consulted by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in a more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • R
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • July 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The source for regional typology statistics are regional indicators at NUTS level 3 published on the Eurostat website or existing in the Eurostat production database. The structure of this domain is as follows: - Metropolitan regions (met)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/metropolitan-regions/overview - Maritime policy indicators (mare)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/maritime-policy-indicators/overview - Urban-rural typology (urt)    For details see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/web/rural-development/overview
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
  • S
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • T
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      20.1. Source data
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, types of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat together with the countries developed a standard core questionnaire (see in Annex) accompanied by a set of definitions and methodological recommendations. CIS 2012 concepts and underlying methodology are also based on the Oslo Manual third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). CIS 2012 results were collected under Commission Regulation No 995/2012. This Regulation sets the mandatory target population of the survey that refers to enterprises in the Core NACE categories (see section 3.3.) with at least 10 employees. Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis in national datasets. Most statistics are based on the 3-year reference period 2010-2012, but some use only one calendar year (2010 or 2012). CIS 2012 includes an ad-hoc module on growth that consists of a set of questions focusing more specifically on the strategies and obstacles for reaching the enterprises' goals. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their microdata through national Safe Centres. Since the provision of the microdata is voluntary, microdatasets do not cover all countries.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 June, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
  • W
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.
    • March 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Community Innovation Survey (CIS) is a survey of innovation activity in enterprises. The harmonised survey is designed to provide information on the innovativeness of sectors by type of enterprises, on the different types of innovation and on various aspects of the development of an innovation, such as the objectives, the sources of information, the public funding or the expenditures. The CIS provides statistics broke down by countries, type of innovators, economic activities and size classes. The survey is currently carried out every two years across the European Union, some EFTA countries and EU candidate countries. In order to ensure comparability across countries, Eurostat, in close cooperation with the countries, has developed a standard core questionnaire starting with the CIS3 data collection, along with an accompanying set of definitions and methodological recommendations. The concepts and underlying methodology of the CIS are also based on the Oslo Manual — second edition of 1997 and third edition of 2005 (see link at the bottom of the page). Up to CIS 2010, CIS results were collected under Commission Regulation (EC) No 1450/2004. A new Regulation will apply from CIS 2012 (EC No 995/2012). The data presented in these tables refer to enterprises with ‘10 employees or more’ active in the sectors to be covered under the Regulation (cf. NACE CORE). Further activities may be covered on a voluntary basis. Most statistics are based on a reference period of three years, but some use one calendar year. Since CIS 2008, the survey has included an ad-hoc module. It consists of a set of questions focusing on a special theme. The themes are different in each survey wave, allowing data to be obtained on specific issues beyond the data usually collected. Overview over time: Initially, the CIS data collection was carried out every four years. The first collection (CIS Light) was launched in 1993 as a pilot exercise and the second (CIS2) was carried out in 1997/1998 for most countries except Greece and Ireland, where it was launched in 1999. The third survey (CIS3) was conducted in 2000/2001 for most participating countries with the exception of Norway, Iceland, Luxembourg and Greece, where it was launched in 2002. As from 2004, the survey has been carried out every two years. CIS4 was conducted in the 25 EU Member States (as for 2004), Iceland, Norway, Bulgaria and Romania. The survey was launched in 2005 with a three-year reference period 2002 to 2004 for most indicators. The fifth survey CIS 2006 was carried out in all 25 EU Member States (as for 2006), Norway, Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. It was launched in 2007, mostly for the reference period 2004 to 2006. As regards CIS 2008, 26 Member States (all except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia and Turkey took part in the survey. CIS 2008 was launched in 2009 with a three-year reference period 2006 to 2008 for most indicators. Changes were made to the CIS 2008 questionnaire to bring it into line with the third revision of the Oslo Manual, 2005 edition, by giving greater weight to organisational and marketing innovation. CIS 2008 was complemented by an ad-hoc module on innovation with environmental benefits. The seventh Community Innovation Survey, CIS 2010, had 31 participating countries (all the EU 27 Member States (except Greece), Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Turkey) and reported most results for the reference period 2008-2010. CIS 2010 also follows the recommendations of the Oslo Manual and reports indicators on four types of innovation: product, process, organisational and marketing. However, despite implementation of the recommendations of the third edition of the Oslo Manual, the question on innovation expenditures is still limited to product and process innovation in order to maintain continuity with earlier versions of the CIS. Furthermore, generally fewer questions are asked about organisational and marketing innovation than about product and process innovation. While the European innovation statistics use the aggregated national data, the microdata sets can be accessed by researchers via the SAFE Centre of Eurostat in Luxembourg or via the microdata on CD-ROM releases in more anonymised form; some countries also provide access to their micro-data at similar safe centres.

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