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Eurostat

Eurostat is the statistical office of the European Union situated in Luxembourg. Its task is to provide the European Union with statistics at European level that enable comparisons between countries and regions and to promote the harmonisation of statistical methods across EU member states and candidates for accession as well as EFTA countries.

All datasets:  A B E N P U
  • A
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
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      Indicator defines the amount of ammonia emissions that is the result of the agricultural sector in economy. Ammonia (NH3) is a colourless, pungent-smelling and corrosive gas that is produced by the decay of organic vegetable matter and from the excrement of humans and animals. When released into the atmosphere, ammonia contributes to the level of air pollution. The EU inventory on air pollution compiled by the European Environment Agency (EEA) under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP Convention) is fully consistent with national air pollution inventories compiled by the EU Member States.
  • B
    • April 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 April, 2019
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      This indicator is defined as the mean annual BOD5 in rivers, weighted by the number of measuring stations. BOD5 is a measure of the amount of oxygen required by aerobic microorganisms to decompose organic substances in a water sample over a period of five days in the dark at 20°C. It is presented as mg O2/L and indicates the quality of water: the lower the value of BOD5, the lower the organic pollution of the water.
  • E
    • February 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 February, 2019
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      The indicator shows the population-weighted concentration of PM10 and PM2.5 to which the urban population is potentially exposed. Fine and coarse particulates (PM10) are those whose diameter is less than 10 micrometres, whilst fine particulates (PM2.5) are those whose diameters are less than 2.5 micrometers. Particulates can be carried deep into the lungs where they can cause inflammation and a worsening of the condition of people with heart and lung diseases. The smaller the particles the deeper they travel into the lungs, with more potential for harm. According to the recommendations of the World Health Organisation (WHO) the annual mean concentration is the best indicator for PM-related health effects. In 1996, the Environment Council adopted Framework Directive 96/62/EC on ambient air quality assessment and management. The first Daughter Directive (1999/30/EC) relating to limit values for PM10 and other pollutants in ambient air fixed an annual limit value of 40 micrograms of PM10 per cubic meter (40 µg/m3). Note that the WHO guideline value is 20 µg/m3 (annual mean). More recently, the Directive 2008/50/EC set a framework to define and establish objectives for ambient air quality and to harmonise methods and criteria among the Member States. This does have limits for PM2.5. The limit value that was due to be met on 1 January 2015 is 25 µg/m3, which falls to 20 µg/m3 by 2020. Note that the WHO guideline value is 10 µg/m3 (annual mean). The directive 2008/50/EC also places a requirement on Member States to assess and reduce population exposure to concentrations of PM2.5 by 2020. The magnitude of the required reduction depends on national average concentrations between 2009 and 2011. Where concentrations for those years were greater than 22 µg/m3, all appropriate measures should be used to reduce below 18 µg/m3 by 2020.
  • N
    • April 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 April, 2019
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      mg NO3 per litreThe indicator refers to concentrations of NO3 in groundwater measured as milligrams per litre (mg NO3/L). Data are taken from well samples and aggregated to annual average concentrations for groundwater bodies in Europe. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included.The number of groundwater bodies included per country is given in parentheses: 1992-2012: Europe (400), Austria (13), Belgium (24), Bulgaria (24), Denmark (97), Estonia (20), Finland (33), Germany (98), Ireland (62), Liechtenstein (1), Lithuania (2), Netherlands (9), Norway (1), Portugal (2), Slovakia (10), Slovenia (4). 2000-2012: Europe (1242), Austria (14), Belgium (38), Bulgaria (42), Cyprus (4), Czech Republic (63), Denmark (108), Estonia (27), Finland (34), France (220), Germany (217), Ireland (89), Italy (7), Liechtenstein (1), Lithuania (3), Luxembourg (3), Malta (2), Netherlands (9), Norway (1), Portugal (10), Serbia (21), Slovakia (10), Slovenia (4), Spain (158), Switzerland (30), United Kingdom (127).
  • P
    • April 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 April, 2019
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      mg PO4 per litreIndicator measures the concentration of Phosphate (PO4) per litre in the dissolved phase from water samples from river stations and aggregated to annual average values. At high concentrations it can cause water quality problems, such as eutrophication, by triggering the growth of macrophytes and algae. Only complete series after inter/extrapolation are included in the data presented.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2019
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      The domain "Income and living conditions" covers four topics: people at risk of poverty or social exclusion, income distribution and monetary poverty, living conditions and material deprivation, which are again structured into collections of indicators on specific topics. The collection "People at risk of poverty or social exclusion" houses main indicator on risk of poverty or social inclusion included in the Europe 2020 strategy as well as the intersections between sub-populations of all Europe 2020 indicators on poverty and social exclusion. The collection "Income distribution and monetary poverty" houses collections of indicators relating to poverty risk, poverty risk of working individuals as well as the distribution of income. The collection "Living conditions" hosts indicators relating to characteristics and living conditions of households, characteristics of the population according to different breakdowns, health and labour conditions, housing conditions as well as childcare related indicators. The collection "Material deprivation" covers indicators relating to economic strain, durables, housing deprivation and environment of the dwelling.
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2019
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      The indicator shows the percentage of the total population who declare that they are affected either by noise from neighbours or from outside.
  • U
    • March 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 March, 2018
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      The indicator shows the population-weighted concentration of ozone to which the urban population is potentially exposed. The principle metric for assessing the effects of ozone on human health is, according to the World Health Organisation’s recommendations (*), the daily maximum 8-hour mean. Ozone effects should be assessed over a full year. Current evidence is insufficient to derive a level below which ozone has no effect on mortality. However, for practical reason it is recommended to consider an exposure parameter which is the sum of excess of daily maximum 8-h means over the cut-off of 70 μg/m3 (35 ppb) calculated for all days in a year. This exposure parameter has been indicated as SOMO35 (sum of means over 35), and is extensively used in the health impact assessments, including the Clean Air for Europe (CAFE) Programme leading to the Commission Communication on the Thematic Strategy on Air Pollution. The indicator is published by Eurostat based on data from the European Environment Agency (EEA). The indicator is a Sustainable Development Indicator (SDI). It has been chosen for the assessment of the progress towards the objectives and targets of the EU Sustainable Development Strategy.   tsdph380´s table: Eurobase > Tables by themes > Environment and Energy > Environment > Greenhouse gases/Air polution > Urban population exposure to air pollution by ozone (tsdph380) tsdph380´s table within the SDI set: Eurobase > Tables on EU policy> Sustainable Development Indicators > Public health > Determinants of health >Urban population exposure to air pollution by ozone (tsdph380)   (*) UN ECE (2004) Summary report prepared by the joint Task Force on the Health Aspects of Air Pollution of the World Health Organization/European Centre for Environment and Health and the Executive Body, EB.AIR/WG.1/2004/11
    • February 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 February, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The indicator shows the population-weighted concentration of PM10 and PM2.5 to which the urban population is potentially exposed. Fine and coarse particulates (PM10) are those whose diameter is less than 10 micrometres, whilst fine particulates (PM2.5) are those whose diameters are less than 2.5 micrometers. Particulates can be carried deep into the lungs where they can cause inflammation and a worsening of the condition of people with heart and lung diseases. The smaller the particles the deeper they travel into the lungs, with more potential for harm. According to the recommendations of the World Health Organisation (WHO) the annual mean concentration is the best indicator for PM-related health effects. In 1996, the Environment Council adopted Framework Directive 96/62/EC on ambient air quality assessment and management. The first Daughter Directive (1999/30/EC) relating to limit values for PM10 and other pollutants in ambient air fixed an annual limit value of 40 micrograms of PM10 per cubic meter (40 µg/m3). Note that the WHO guideline value is 20 µg/m3 (annual mean). More recently, the Directive 2008/50/EC set a framework to define and establish objectives for ambient air quality and to harmonise methods and criteria among the Member States. This does have limits for PM2.5. The limit value that was due to be met on 1 January 2015 is 25 µg/m3, which falls to 20 µg/m3 by 2020. Note that the WHO guideline value is 10 µg/m3 (annual mean). The directive 2008/50/EC also places a requirement on Member States to assess and reduce population exposure to concentrations of PM2.5 by 2020. The magnitude of the required reduction depends on national average concentrations between 2009 and 2011. Where concentrations for those years were greater than 22 µg/m3, all appropriate measures should be used to reduce below 18 µg/m3 by 2020.

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