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Eurostat

Eurostat is the statistical office of the European Union situated in Luxembourg. Its task is to provide the European Union with statistics at European level that enable comparisons between countries and regions and to promote the harmonisation of statistical methods across EU member states and candidates for accession as well as EFTA countries.

All datasets:  A L R
  • A
    • December 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 February, 2019
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      Structural business statistics (SBS) describes the structure, conduct and performance of economic activities, down to the most detailed activity level (several hundred economic sectors). SBS are transmitted annually by the EU Member States on the basis of a legal obligation from 1995 onwards.   SBS covers all activities of the business economy with the exception of agricultural activities and personal services and the data are provided by all EU Member States, Norway and Switzerland, some candidate and potential candidate countries. The data are collected by domain of activity (annex) : Annex I - Services, Annex II - Industry, Annex III - Trade and Annex IV- Constructions and by datasets. Each annex contains several datasets as indicated in the SBS Regulation. The majority of the data is collected by National Statistical Institutes (NSIs) by means of statistical surveys, business registers or from various administrative sources. Regulatory or controlling national offices for financial institutions or central banks often provide the information required for the financial sector (NACE Rev 2 Section K / NACE Rev 1.1 Section J). Member States apply various statistical methods, according to the data source, such as grossing up, model based estimation or different forms of imputation, to ensure the quality of SBSs produced. Main characteristics (variables) of the SBS data category: Business Demographic variables (e.g. Number of enterprises)"Output related" variables (e.g. Turnover, Value added)"Input related" variables: labour input (e.g. Employment, Hours worked); goods and services input (e.g. Total of purchases); capital input (e.g. Material investments) All SBS characteristics are published on Eurostat’s website by tables and an example of the existent tables is presented below: Annual enterprise statistics: Characteristics collected are published by country and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 class level (4-digits). Some classes or groups in 'services' section have been aggregated.Annual enterprise statistics broken down by size classes: Characteristics are published by country and detailed down to NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 group level (3-digits) and employment size class. For trade (NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 Section G) a supplementary breakdown by turnover size class is available.Annual regional statistics: Four characteristics are published by NUTS-2 country region and detailed on NACE Rev 2 and NACE Rev 1.1 division level (2-digits) (but to group level (3-digits) for the trade section). More information on the contents of different tables: the detail level and breakdowns required starting with the reference year 2008 is defined in Commission Regulation N° 251/2009. For previous reference years it is included in Commission Regulations (EC) N° 2701/98 and amended by Commission Regulation N°1614/2002 and Commission Regulation N°1669/2003. Several important derived indicators are generated in the form of ratios of certain monetary characteristics or per head values. A list with the available derived indicators is available below in the Annex.
  • L
    • September 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2015
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    • September 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 November, 2015
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    • April 2018
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 April, 2018
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      Labour productivity per hour worked is calculated as real output (deflated GDP measured in chain-linked volumes, reference year 2010) per unit of labour input (measured by the total number of hours worked). Measuring labour productivity per hour worked provides a better picture of productivity developments in the economy than labour productivity per person employed, as it eliminates differences in the full time/part time composition of the workforce across countries and years.
    • April 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 April, 2019
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      Gross domestic product (GDP) is a measure for the economic activity. It is defined as the value of all goods and services produced less the value of any goods or services used in their creation. GDP per person employed is intended to give an overall impression of the productivity of national economies expressed in relation to the European Union (EU28) average. If the index of a country is higher than 100, this country's level of GDP per person employed is higher than the EU average and vice versa. Basic figures are expressed in PPS, i.e. a common currency that eliminates the differences in price levels between countries allowing meaningful volume comparisons of GDP between countries. Please note that 'persons employed' does not distinguish between full-time and part-time employment. Labour productivity per hour worked is calculated as real output per unit of labour input (measured by the total number of hours worked). Measuring labour productivity per hour worked provides a better picture of productivity developments in the economy than labour productivity per person employed, as it eliminates differences in the full time/part time composition of the workforce across countries and years.
  • R
    • April 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 April, 2019
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      The unit labour cost (ULC) measures the average cost of labour per unit of output. It is calculated as the ratio of labour costs to labour productivity. The ULC represents a link between productivity and the cost of labour in producing output. The input data are obtained through official transmissions of national accounts' country data in the European system of accounts - ESA2010 - transmission programme. Nominal ULC (NULC) is calculated as: (D1/EEM) / (B1GM/ETO), where: D1 = Compensation of employees, all industries, in current prices EEM = Employees, all industries, in persons (following the domestic concept) B1GM = Gross domestic product at market prices in millions, chain-linked volumes reference year 2010 ETO = Total employment, all industries, in persons (following the domestic concept). The MIP scoreboard indicator is the Nominal unit labour cost - 3 years % change. In the MIP domain are also published annual figures on: NULC - 1, 3, 5 and 10 years % change and index 2010=100Real labour productivity - 1, 3, 5 and 10 years % change and index 2010=100ULC performance related to the Euro area – 1 and 10 years % change And quarterly data: NULC – 1 year % change and index 2010=100Real labour productivity – 1 year % change and index 2010=100
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
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      This metadata refers to two datasets based one and the same data collection:Material flow accounts (env_ac_mfa): detailed material input flows into the national economy (in tonnes)Resource productivity (env_ac_rp): various ratios of gross domestic product (GDP) over domestic material consumption (DMC)   1. Economy-wide material flow accounts (EW-MFA) compile material flow inputs into national economies. EW-MFA cover all solid, gaseous, and liquid material inputs, except for water and air, measured in mass units per year. Like the system of national accounts, EW-MFA constitute a multi-purpose information system. The detailed material flows provide a rich empirical database for numerous analytical purposes. Further, EW-MFA are used to derive various material flow indicators such as:Domestic extraction (DE): total amount of material extracted for further processing in the economy, by resident units from the natural environment;Imports (IMP): imports of products in their simple mass weight;Direct material input (DMI): measures the direct input of material into the economy; it includes all materials which are of economic value and which are availble for use in production and consumption activities (DE+IMP);Exports (EXP): exports of products in their simple mass weight;Domestic material consumption (DMC): measures the total amount of material actually consumed domestically by resident units (DE+IMP-EXP). Note: IMP and EXP are distinguished into extra-EU-trade and total trade.   2. Resource productivity (GDP/DMC) is defined as the ratio of gross domestic product (GDP) over domestic material consumption (DMC) and commonly expressed in Euro per kilogram of material. The data set env_ac_rp employs different types of GDP for calculating this ratio, depending on the analytical perspective (see item 4). The term designates an indicator that reflects the GDP generated per unit of resources used by the economy. This is typically a macro-economic concept that can be presented alongside labour or capital productivity.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
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      Resource productivity is gross domestic product (GDP) divided by domestic material consumption (DMC). DMC measures the total amount of materials directly used by an economy. It is defined as the annual quantity of raw materials extracted from the domestic territory of the focal economy, plus all physical imports minus all physical exports. It is important to note that the term 'consumption', as used in DMC, denotes apparent consumption and not final consumption. DMC does not include upstream flows related to imports and exports of raw materials and products originating outside of the focal economy. For the calculation of resource productivity, Eurostat uses GDP either in unit 'EUR in chain-linked volumes' (to the reference year 2010 at 2010 exchange rates) or in unit 'PPS' (Purchasing Power Standard). Consequently, the indicator is expressed: i) in euro per kg, for comparing the changes in one country over time; ii) in PPS per kg, for comparing different countries in one specific year. It is also calculated as an index on year 2000, for comparing countries in different years. More information on resource productivity can be found in Statistics Explained.
    • March 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Resource productivity is gross domestic product (GDP) divided by domestic material consumption (DMC). DMC measures the total amount of materials directly used by an economy. It is defined as the annual quantity of raw materials extracted from the domestic territory of the focal economy, plus all physical imports minus all physical exports. It is important to note that the term 'consumption', as used in DMC, denotes apparent consumption and not final consumption. DMC does not include upstream flows related to imports and exports of raw materials and products originating outside of the focal economy. For the calculation of resource productivity, Eurostat uses GDP either in unit 'EUR in chain-linked volumes' (to the reference year 2010 at 2010 exchange rates) or in unit 'PPS' (Purchasing Power Standard). Consequently, the indicator is expressed: i) in euro per kg, for comparing the changes in one country over time; ii) in PPS per kg, for comparing different countries in one specific year. It is also calculated as an index on year 2000, for comparing countries in different years. More information on resource productivity can be found in Statistics Explained.