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Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation

The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) is an independent global health research center at the University of Washington that provides rigorous and comparable measurement of the world's most important health problems and evaluates the strategies used to address them. IHME makes this information freely available so that policymakers have the evidence they need to make informed decisions about how to allocate resources to best improve population health.

All datasets:  D I
  • D
    • April 2019
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 June, 2019
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      This 10th edition of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation’s annual Financing Global Health report provides the most up-to-date estimates of development assistance for health, domestic spending on health, health spending on two key infectious diseases – malaria and HIV/AIDS – and future scenarios of health spending. Several transitions in global health financing inform this report: the influence of economic development on the composition of health spending; the emergence of other sources of development assistance funds and initiatives; and the increased availability of disease-specific funding data for the global health community. For funders and policymakers with sights on achieving 2030 global health goals, these estimates are of critical importance. They can be used for identifying funding gaps, evaluating the allocation of scarce resources, and comparing funding across time and countries.
  • I
    • December 2010
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      IHME results from paper, Public financing of health in developing countries: a cross-national systematic analysis published in The Lancet in April 2010. This dataset provides estimates on domestically financed government health expenditures in developing countries and development assistance for health (DAH) to governmental and non-governmental recipients from 1995 to 2006.