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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international economic organisation of 34 countries founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade. It is a forum of countries committed to democracy and the market economy, providing a platform to compare policy experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practices and co-ordinate domestic and international policies of its members.

All datasets:  E I N S
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    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 April, 2019
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    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 July, 2019
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      Data on grants by type is not available for all OECD countries. A partial dataset is available for one or more years in the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Canada, Estonia, France, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal. No data on grants by type is available for Germany, Israel, New Zealand, Slovak Republic, United Kingdom, United States. The different types of grants are defined as follows: Earmarked grants An earmarked grant is a grant that is given under the condition that it can only be used for a specific purpose. Non-earmarked grants Non-earmarked grants can be spent as if they were the receiving sub-national government's own (non-earmarked) tax revenues. Mandatory grants Mandatory grants (entitlements) are legal, rules-based obligations for the government that issues the grant. This requires that both the size of the grant and the conditions under which it is given be laid down in a statute or executive decree and that these conditions be both necessary and sufficient. Discretionary grants Discretionary grants, and the conditions under which they are given, are not determined by rules but decided on an ad hoc, discretionary basis. Discretionary grants are often temporary in nature and include, for example, grants for specific infrastructural projects or emergency aid to a disaster area. Matching grants Matching grants are grants designed to complement sub-national contributions. Matching grants are dependent on normative or actual spending for services for which the grants are earmarked or on local revenue collection related to these services. Non-matching grants Non-matching grants are grants not directly linked to any sub-national contribution. Current grants Current grants are grants assumed to be spent on either current or capital expenditures. Capital grants Capital grants are grants assumed to be spent only on capital expenditures.
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    • March 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 March, 2019
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      Annual National Accounts>General Government Accounts>750. General Government Debt-Maastricht   Unit of measure used: National currency; current prices. Expressed in millions   Statistical population: Government debt as defined in the Maastricht Treaty (Source : Eurostat). Available for Europeans countries only. In the Protocol on the excessive deficit procedure annexed to the Maastricht Treaty, government debt is defined as the debt of the whole general government sector: gross, consolidated and nominal value (face value). It excludes the other accounts payable (AF.7), as well as, if they exist, insurance technical reserve (AF.6).
    • March 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Sivakama Sundari
      Accessed On: 13 March, 2019
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      It provides a breakdown of government expenditure according to their function. To meet this end, economic flows of expenditure must be aggregated according to the Classification of the Functions of Government (COFOG).
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    • June 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 June, 2019
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      The subnational government finance dataset presents data on the institutional organisation at local and regional levels as well as on public finance. Financial data cover the general government sector and subnational government subsector (state and local government levels) in the 35 OECD member countries and in the EU. Four main dimensions are presented: expenditure (including investment), revenue, budget balance and debt. The dataset is released as a beta version. Data at country level are derived mainly from the OECD National Accounts harmonised according to the new standards of the System of National Accounts (SNA) 2008, implemented by most OECD countries since December 2014. They are complemented by data from Eurostat, IMF (Australia, Chile), and national statistical institutes for some countries or indicators (in particular, territorial organisation). Data were extracted in February 2017 and are from 2015, unless otherwise specified