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Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international economic organisation of 34 countries founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade. It is a forum of countries committed to democracy and the market economy, providing a platform to compare policy experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practices and co-ordinate domestic and international policies of its members.

All datasets:  A C F G H I M O P R S T
  • A
    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 April, 2019
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      commitment is a firm written obligation by a government or official agency, backed by the appropriation or availability of the necessary funds, to provide resources of a specified amount under specified financial terms and conditions and for specified purposes for the benefit of a recipient country or a multilateral agency. Members unable to comply with this definition should explain the definition that they use. -- Commitments are considered to be made at the date a loan or grant agreement is signed or the obligation is otherwise made known to the recipient (e.g. in the case of budgetary allocations to overseas territories, the final vote of the budget should be taken as the date of commitment). For certain special expenditures, e.g. emergency aid, the date of disbursement may be taken as the date of commitment. -- Bilateral commitments comprise new commitments and additions to earlier commitments, excluding any commitments cancelled during the same year. Cancellations and reductions in the year reported on of commitments made in earlier years are reported in the CRS, but not in the DAC questionnaire. -- In contrast to bilateral commitments, commitments of capital subscriptions, grants and loans to multilateral agencies should show the sum of amounts which are expected to be disbursed before the end of the next year and amounts disbursed in the year reported on but not previously reported as a commitment. For capital subscriptions in the form of notes payable at sight, enter the expected amount of deposits of such notes as the amount committed.
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 July, 2019
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      Destination of Official Development Assistance Disbursements. Geographical breakdown by donor, recipient and for some types of aid (e.g. grant, loan, technical co-operation) on a disbursement basis (i.e. actual expenditures). The data cover flows from bilateral and multilateral donors which focus on flows from DAC member countries and the EU Institutions.
  • C
    • April 2018
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 May, 2018
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      Note: CPA data for 2018 and 2019 are projections from the 2016 Survey on Forward Spending Plans. Country Programmable Aid (CPA), outlined in our Development Brief  and also known as “core” aid, is the portion of aid donors programme for individual countries, and over which partner countries could have a significant say. CPA is much closer than ODA to capturing the flows of aid that goes to the partner country, and has been proven in several studies to be a good proxy of aid recorded at country level. CPA was developed in 2007 in close collaboration with DAC members. It is derived on the basis of DAC statistics and was retroactively calculated from 2000 onwards
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2016
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      Country Programmable Aid (CPA), outlined in our Development Brief  and also known as “core” aid, is the portion of aid donors programme for individual countries, and over which partner countries could have a significant say. CPA is much closer than ODA to capturing the flows of aid that goes to the partner country, and has been proven in several studies to be a good proxy of aid recorded at country level. CPA was developed in 2007 in close collaboration with DAC members. It is derived on the basis of DAC statistics and was retroactively calculated from 2000 onwards
  • F
    • February 2018
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 June, 2018
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      FDI data are based on statistics provided by 35 OECD member countries and by Lithuania. BMD4: OECD Benchmark Definition of Foreign Direct Investment - 4th Edition
    • March 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 March, 2019
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    • June 2018
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 July, 2018
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    • May 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 May, 2019
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      Data include pension funds per the OECD classification by type of pension plans and by type of pension funds. All types of plans are included (occupational and personal, mandatory and voluntary). The OECD classification considers both funded and book reserved pension plans that are workplace-based (occupational pension plans) or accessed directly in retail markets (personal pension plans). Both mandatory and voluntary arrangements are included. The data include plans where benefits are paid by a private sector entity (classified as private pension plans by the OECD) as well as those paid by a funded public sector entity. A full description of the OECD classification can be found at:http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/0/49/38356329.pdf. Pension funds include also some personal pension arrangements like the Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) in the United States as well as funds for government workers. The coverage of the statistics follows the regulatory and supervisory framework. All authorised pension funds are therefore normally covered by the Global Pension Statistics exercise. Assets pertaining to reserve funds in social security systems are excluded.
    • March 2018
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 May, 2018
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      Data include pension funds per the OECD classification by type of pension plans and by type of pension funds. All types of plans are included (occupational and personal, mandatory and voluntary). The OECD classification considers both funded and book reserved pension plans that are workplace-based (occupational pension plans) or accessed directly in retail markets (personal pension plans). Both mandatory and voluntary arrangements are included. The data include plans where benefits are paid by a private sector entity (classified as private pension plans by the OECD) as well as those paid by a funded public sector entity. A full description of the OECD classification can be found at: http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/0/49/38356329.pdf.  Pension funds include also some personal pension arrangements like the Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) in the United States as well as funds for government workers. The coverage of the statistics follows the regulatory and supervisory framework. All authorised pension funds are therefore normally covered by the Global Pension Statistics exercise. Assets pertaining to reserve funds in social security systems are excluded.
  • G
    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 April, 2019
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      The GID-DB is a database providing researchers and policymakers with key data on gender-based discrimination in social institutions. This data helps analyse women’s empowerment and understand gender gaps in other key areas of development.Covering 180 countries and territories, the GID-DB contains comprehensive information on legal, cultural and traditional practices that discriminate against women and girls.
    • September 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2019
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    • March 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 March, 2019
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      This table provides information on the main relevant indicators. The data have mainly been supplied by the World Bank, and cover, where available: -Current Gross National Income (GNI) in US $ millions; -GNI per capita (US $); -Population; -Energy use as kilogram of oil per capita; -Average Life Expectancy of Adults; and -Adult Literacy Rate as a percentage of the country population. Data for Sudan include South Sudan, with the exception of total population, which is reported separately.
    • February 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 February, 2019
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      Bilateral ODA commitments by purpose. Data cover the years 2005 to 2009. Amounts are expressed in USD million. The sectoral distribution of bilateral ODA commitments refers to the economic sector of destination (i.e. the specific area of the recipient's economic or social structure whose development is, or is intended to be fostered by the aid), rather than to the type of goods or services provided. These are aggregates of individual projects notified under the Creditor Reporting System, supplemented by reporting on the sectoral distribution of technical co-operation, and on actual disbursements of food and emergency aid.
    • May 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 June, 2019
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      Pension assets continued to rise in 2017, exceeding USD 40 trillion in the OECD area for the first time ever, with almost all countries showing positive investment results. This can be attributed to the strong investment performance of pension assets that benefitted from buoyant stock markets
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 October, 2019
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      This dataset contains selected indicators for monitoring progress towards green growth to support policy making and inform the public at large. The indicator bring together the OECD's statistics, indicators and measures of progress. The dataset covers OECD countries as well as BRIICS economies (Brazil, Russian Federation, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa), and selected countries when possible. The indicators are selected according to well specified criteria and embedded in a conceptual framework, which is structured around four groups to capture the main features of green growth: Environmental and resource productivity, to indicate whether economic growth is becoming greener with more efficient use of natural capital and to capture aspects of production which are rarely quantified in economic models and accounting frameworks; The natural asset base, to indicate the risks to growth from a declining natural asset base; Environmental quality of life, to indicate how environmental conditions affect the quality of life and wellbeing of people; Economic opportunities and policy responses, to indicate the effectiveness ofpolicies in delivering green growth and describe the societal responses needed to secure business and employment opportunities.
  • H
  • I
    • May 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2019
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      These data are part of a larger database, hosted on a different website, which includes both quantitative and qualitative data, as well as graphs.
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 October, 2019
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      Most of the data published in this database are taken from the individual contributions of national correspondents appointed by the OECD Secretariat with the approval of the authorities of Member countries. Consequently, these data have not necessarily been harmonised at international level. This network of correspondents, constituting the Continuous Reporting System on Migration (SOPEMI), covers most OECD Member countries as well as the Baltic States, Bulgaria and Romania. SOPEMI has no authority to impose changes in data collection procedures. It is an observatory which, by its very nature, has to use existing statistics. However, it does play an active role in suggesting what it considers to be essential improvements in data collection and makes every effort to present consistent and well-documented statistics.
  • M
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 July, 2019
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      The data presented come from two international sources: (1) UN and International Resource Panel "Global Material Flows Database" for non-EU OECD and non-OECD countries, and (2) Eurostat  "Material Flows and Resource Productivity" database for EU OECD countries. It should be born in mind that the data should be interpreted with caution and that the time series presented here may change in future as work on methodologies for MF accounting progresses. Furthermore, data contain rough estimates for OECD and BRIICS aggregates. These data refer to material resources, i.e. materials originating from natural resources that form the material basis of the economy: metals (ferrous, non-ferrous) non-metallic minerals (construction minerals, industrial minerals), biomass (wood, food) and fossil energy carriers. The use of materials in production and consumption processes has many economic, social and environmental consequences. These consequences often extend beyond the borders of countries or regions, notably when materials are traded internationally, either in the form of raw materials or as products embodying them. They differ among the various materials and among the various stages of the resource life cycle (extraction, processing, use, transport, end-of-life management). From an environmental point of view these consequences depend on:the rate of extraction and depletion of renewable and non-renewable resource stocksthe extent of harvest and the reproductive capacity and natural productivity of renewable resourcesthe associated environmental burden (e.g. pollution, waste, habitat disruption), and its effects on environmental quality (e.g. air, water, soil, biodiversity, landscape) and on related environmental services These data inform about physical flows of material resources at various levels of detail and at various stages of the flow chain. The information shows: a) the material basis of economies and its composition by major material groups, considering:the extraction of raw materials;the trade balance in physical terms;the consumption of materials;the material inputs b) the consumption of selected materials that are of environmental and economic significance. c) in-use stocks of selected products that are of environmental and economic significance. Domestic extraction used (DEU) refers to the flows of raw materials extracted or harvested from the environment and that physically enter the economic system for further processing or direct consumption (they are used by the economy as material factor inputs). Imports (IMP) and exports (EXP) are major components of the direct material flow indicators DMI (domestic material input) and DMC (domestic material consumption). They cannot be taken as indication of domestic resource requirements. Domestic material consumption (DMC) refers to the amount of materials directly used in an economy, which refers to the apparent consumption of materials. DMC is computed as DEU minus exports plus imports. Direct material input (DMI) is computed as DEU plus imports. The material groups are: Food: food crops (e.g. cereals, roots, sugar and oil bearing crops, fruits, vegetables), fodder crops (including grazing), wild animals (essentially marine catches), small amounts of non-edible biomass (e.g. fibres, rubber), and related products including livestock. Wood: harvested wood and traded products essentially made of wood (paper, furniture, etc.). Construction minerals: non-metallic construction minerals whether primary or processed. They comprise marble, granite, sandstone, porphyry, basalt, other ornamental or building stone (excluding slate); chalk and dolomite; sand and gravel; clays and kaolin; limestone and gypsum. Industrial minerals: non-metallic industrial minerals whether primary or processed (e.g. salts, arsenic, potash, phosphate rocks, sulphates, asbestos). Metals: metal ores, metals and products mainly made of metals. Fossil energy materials/carriers: coal, crude oil, natural gas and peat, as well as manufactured products predominantly made of fossil fuels (e.g. plastics, synthetic rubber).
    • December 2018
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 December, 2018
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      Air pollution is considered one of the most pressing environmental and health issues across OECD countries and beyond. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ground-level ozone (O3) have potentially the most significant adverse effects on health compared to other pollutants. PM2.5 can be inhaled and cause serious health problems including both respiratory and cardiovascular disease, having its most severe effects on children and elderly people. Exposure to PM2.5 has been shown to considerably increase the risk of heart disease and stroke in particular. For these reasons, population exposure to (outdoor or ambient) PM2.5 has been identified as an OECD Green Growth headline indicator. Exposure to ground-level ozone (O3) has serious consequences for human health, contributing to, or triggering, respiratory diseases. These include breathing problems, asthma and reduced lung function (WHO, 2016; Brauer et al., 2016). Ozone exposure is highest in emission-dense countries with warm and sunny summers. The most important determinants are background atmospheric chemistry, climate, anthropogenic and biogenic emissions of ozone precursors such as volatile organic compounds, and the ratios between different emitted chemicals.
  • O
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 October, 2019
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    • May 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 May, 2019
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      Other official flows are official sector transactions which do not meet the ODA criteria, e.g.:  i.) Grants to developing countries for representational or essentially commercial purposes;  ii.) Official bilateral transactions intended to promote development but having a grant element of less than 25 per cent;  iii.) Official bilateral transactions, whatever their grant element, that are primarily export-facilitating in purpose. This category includes by definition export credits extended directly to an aid recipient by an official agency or institution ("official direct export credits");  iv.) The net acquisition by governments and central monetary institutions of securities issued by multilateral development banks at market terms;  v.) Subsidies (grants) to the private sector to soften its credits to developing countries [see Annex 3, paragraph A3.5.iv)b)];  vi.) Funds in support of private investment.
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 July, 2019
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      This table contains figures on the activity of affiliates located abroad by host country in the total manufacturing, total services and total business enterprise sectors. The units used to present data in AMNE are millions of national currency for monetary variables and units for the other variables. Monetary variables are in current prices. Euro-area countries: national currency data is expressed in euro beginning with the year of entry into the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). For years prior to the year of entry into EMU, data have been converted from the former national currency using the appropriate irrevocable conversion rate. This presentation facilitates comparisons within a country over time and ensures that the historical evolution is preserved. Please note, however, that pre-EMU euro are a notional unit and should not be used to form area aggregates or to carry out cross-country comparisons.
  • P
  • R
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 October, 2019
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      Data on government sector receipts, and on taxes in particular, are basic inputs to most structural economic descriptions and economic analyses and are increasingly used in international comparisons. This annual database presents a unique set of detailed and internationally comparable data on both tax and non-tax revenue in a common format for African countries participating in Revenue Statistics in Africa. Click to collapse Direct source Country representatives authorized to obtain revenue data from the appropriate government departments and responsible for compiling the data and preparing data tables that adhere to the OECD tax classification.
  • S
  • T
    • April 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 April, 2019
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    • September 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2019
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      Official Development Financing (ODF), measured for recipient countries only, is defined as the sum of their receipts of bilateral ODA, concessional and non-concessional resources from multilateral sources, and bilateral other official flows made available for reasons unrelated to trade, in particular loans to refinance debt.
    • May 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2019
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      Total Official Flows: the sum of Official Development Assistance (ODA) and Other Official Flows (OOF) represents the total (gross or net) disbursements by the official sector at large to the recipient country shown.
    • May 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2019
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      Total Receipts, Net: in addition to Official Development Assistance, this heading includes in particular: other official bilateral transactions which are not concessional or which, even though they have concessional elements, are primarily trade facilitating in character (i.e., "Other Official Flows''); changes in bilateral long-term assets of the private non-monetary and monetary sectors, in particular guaranteed export credits, private direct investment, portfolio investment and, to the extent they are not covered in the preceding headings, loans by private banks. Flows from the multilateral sector which are not classified as concessional are also included here.

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