An error occured. Details Hide
You have unsaved pages. Restore Cancel

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is an international economic organisation of 34 countries founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade. It is a forum of countries committed to democracy and the market economy, providing a platform to compare policy experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practices and co-ordinate domestic and international policies of its members.

All datasets:  C F I M O P R T
  • C
    • August 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The country statistical profiles provide a broad selection of indicators, illustrating the demographic, economic, environmental and social developments, for all OECD members. The dataset also covers the five key partner economies with which the OECD has developed an enhanced engagement program with (Brazil, China, India, Indonesia and South Africa) ,accession countries (Colombia, Costa Rica and Lithuania) , Peru and the Russian Federation. The user can easily compare indicators across all countries. Total fertility rates - Unit of measure used: Number of children born to women aged 15 to 49
  • F
    • August 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Key statistical concept Although there are clear definitions for all the terms used in this survey, countries might have different methodologies to calculate tonne-kilometer and passenger-kilometers. Methods could be based on traffic or mobility surveys, use very different sampling methods and estimating techniques which could affect the comparability of their statistics. Also, if the definition on road fatalities is very clear and well applied by most countries, this is not the case for road injuries. Indeed, not only countries might have different definitions but the important underreporting of road injuries in most countries can distort analysis based on these data.
  • I
    • October 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 October, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The International Transport Forum collects, on a quarterly basis, monthly data from all its Member countries. When monthly information is not available then quarterly data is provided. The survey contains a dozen variables selected for their quarterly availability among reporting countries. Data are collected from Transport Ministries, statistical offices and other institution designated as official data source. The survey used for this exercise is the ITF "Quarterly Transport Statistics". Variables collected are rail, road and inland waterways goods transport (T-km), rail passengers (P-km), road traffic (V-km), first registration of brand new vehicles, petrol deliveries to the road transport sector and road fatalities. Although there are clear definitions for all the terms used in this survey, countries might have different methodologies to gather or estimate quarterly data. The information provided in short-term surveys does not necessarily have the same coverage as annual data exercises and therefore remains provisional. Depending on countries, data is not always revised so totals might not correspond to the sum of the elements. The main purpose of this data collection is to identify in advance changes in transport data trends. In case of missing data for a country, ITF can calculate estimates based generally on growth rates from previous years or from data available from other sources. These estimates are used solely to calculate aggregated trends in graphic representations and are not shown at the individual country level.  
  • M
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The Maritime Transport Costs (MTC)database contains data from 1991 to the most recent available year of bilateral maritime transport costs. Transport costs are available for 43 importing countries (including EU15 countries as a custom union) from 218 countries of origin at the detailed commodity (6 digit) level of the Harmonized System 1988. This dataset should only be used in conjunction with the paper Clarifying Trade Costs in Maritime Transport which outlines methodology, data coverage and caveats to its use. Key Statistical Concept Import charges represent the aggregate cost of all freight, insurance and other charges (excluding import duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from alongside the carrier at the port of export and placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in the importing country. Insurance charges are therefore included in the transport cost variables and are estimated to be approximately 1.5% of the import value of the merchandise.
  • O
  • P
    • May 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 May, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The International Transport Forum collects data on transport statistics on annual basis from all its Member countries. Data are collected from Transport Ministries, statistical offices and other institution designated as official data source. Variables collected are inland transport of goods (T-km), of passengers (P-km) and road injury accidents. Additional information is also gathered on containers transported by rail and sea (Tons and TEU) as well as short sea shipping data (T-km).
  • R
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      International comparisons of taxes and charges on road haulage require a framework that can relate all the various taxes and charges levied on transport activities to marginal costs, if they are to provide satisfactory answers to the following types of question: -Do hauliers in one country pay more than in the other, and what impact does this have on the profitability of haulage in each country? -Is the impact of an increase in tax on diesel the same in each country or are differences in the taxation of labour more significant? -Do these differences distort the international haulage market? The 2003 ECMT Report 'Reforming Transport Taxes' developed a methodology for making such comparisons. The database presents information on vehicle taxes, fuel excise duties and user charges and takes also into account any possible refunds, rebates and exemptions. These data allow for comparison of road freight transport fiscal regimes in different countries in quantitative terms. In order to allow for comparisons of road freight taxation regimes in different countries, net taxation levels are calculated for a standard domestic haul (400-km domestic hauls with 40 tonne trucks). These results are then assessed per vehicle-km and per tonne-kilometre.
    • May 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2019
      Select Dataset
      Although there are clear definitions for all the terms used in this survey, countries might have different methodologies to calculate tonne-kilometre and passenger-kilometres. Methods could be based on traffic or mobility surveys, use very different sampling methods and estimating techniques which could affect the comparability of their statistics. Also, if the definition on road fatalities is very clear and well applied by most countries, this is not the case for road injuries. Indeed, not only countries might have different definitions but the important underreporting of road injuries in most countries can distort analysis based on these data. 
  • T
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
      The lack of common definitions and practices to measure transport infrastructure spending hinders comparisons between countries and spending options. Data for road and rail infrastructure are the most comprehensive while data on sea port and airport spending are less detailed in coverage and definition. While our survey covers all sources of financing a number of countries exclude private spending, including Japan and India. Around 65% of countries report data on urban spending while for the remaining countries data on spending in this area are missing. Indicators such as the share of GDP needed for investment in transport infrastructure, depend on a number of factors, such as the quality and age of existing infrastructure, maturity of the transport system, geography of the country and transport-intensity of its productive sector. Caution is therefore required when comparing investment data between countries. However, data for individual countries and country groups are consistent over time and useful for identifying underlying trends and changes in levels of spending, especially for inland transport infrastructure. These issues of definitions and methods are addressed in a companion report Understanding the Value of Transport Infrastructure – Guidelines for macro-level measurement of spending and assets (ITF/OECD2013) that aims to improve the international collection of related statistics.
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 July, 2019
      Select Dataset
    • August 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      This data set is a combination of three tables, 1. Good Transport- Inland freight 2. Passenger transport 3. Transport Safety- Road injury accidents- Road CausalitiesThe geographical area covered is the ITF member countries.The International Transport Forum collects data on transport statistics on annual basis from all its Member countries. Data are collected from Transport Ministries, statistical offices and other institution designated as official data source.TEU (Twenty-foot Equivalent Unit): a statistical unit based on an ISO container of 20 foot length (6.10 m) to provide a standardised measure of containers of various capacities and for describing the capacity of container ships or terminals. one 20 Foot ISO container equals 1 TEU.  

Our Privacy Statement & Cookie Policy

Our website uses cookies to improve your online experience. They were placed on your computer when you launched this website. You can change your personal cookie settings through your internet browser settings.

Privacy Policy