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Texas Education Agency

The Texas Education Agency is the state agency that oversees primary and secondary public education in the state of Texas. It helps deliver education to more than 5 million students. Located in Austin, Texas at 1701 N. Congress Ave., TEA, under the leadership of the commissioner of education, carries out the following functions:  Administers the distribution of state and federal funding to public schools.  Administers the statewide assessment program and accountability system.  Provides support to the State Board of Education (SBOE) in the development of the statewide curriculum.  Assists the SBOE in the instructional materials adoption process and managing the instructional materials distribution process.  Administers a data collection system on public school information.  Performs the administrative functions and services of the State Board for Educator Certification.  Supports agency operations, including carrying out duties related to the Permanent School Fund.  Monitors for compliance with certain federal and state guidelines.

All datasets:  A C D F T
  • A
  • C
    • January 2017
      Source: Texas Education Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 July, 2017
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      Numbers of graduates and graduating examinees are masked in such a manner as to provide a general idea of the size of the group while maintaining student anonymity. In addition, blank cells indicate: (a) average scores were not available because no graduates took the ACT, or are not reported to maintain student anonymity; or (b) percentages are undefined, or not reported to prevent imputation.
  • D
    • December 2017
      Source: Texas Education Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 January, 2018
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      A denominator represents the total number of students enrolled during the school year or the total number of students within a student group. A numerator represents the total number of students who dropped out during the school year. Note:  From source a dash (-) and a dot (.) have been not covered in this dataset. A dash (-): indicates data are not reported to protect student anonymity. When the number of dropouts is not reported, the total number of students is presented in such a manner as to provide a general idea of the number of students in the group while maintaining student anonymity. A dot (.): indicates there were no students in the group or, in rare cases, that a reporting anomaly prevented calculation of the rate.
  • F
    • January 2018
      Source: Texas Education Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 January, 2018
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    • December 2017
      Source: Texas Education Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 January, 2018
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      A denominator represents the total number of students within the class or within a student group. A numerator represents the total number of students with one of four final statuses (i.e., graduate, continuer, GED recipient, dropout) within each student group. A dash (-) indicates data are not reported to protect student anonymity. When the number of students represented by a final status is not reported, the corresponding class size may be presented in such a manner as to provide a general idea of the number of students in the class while maintaining student anonymity. A dot (.) indicates there were no students in the group.
  • T
    • November 2016
      Source: Texas Education Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 August, 2017
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      The Texas Education Agency (TEA) prepares data and reports related to college admissions testing, including SAT and ACT, in Texas public schools. Note: Data collected using average of all district & regions. https://rptsvr1.tea.texas.gov/acctres/satact/2015/sat_act_glossary_class_2015.html
    • October 2012
      Source: Texas Education Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 September, 2017
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      2014-2015 Statewide School Districts for Texas. This information was collected from all 253 county central appraisal districts and from the Texas Education Agency. GIS staff of the Texas Legislative Council created the school district boundaries using the 2010 TIGER/Line Shapefile as base geography and made further corrections to match the school district boundary updates and name changes for the 2014-2015 School Year. These changes include lines that are not census geography. Changes to school district boundaries may include one or all of the following types: school district annexations or de-annexations; school district consolidations, deletions or additions; boundary corrections to the Texas Legislative Council database; boundary adjustments due to more spatially accurate data involving land parcels and survey data received from a county central appraisal district. Note: The 2014-2015 School Year school districts in the council's geographic file are not the same as the districts in the Census Bureau's 2010 TIGER/Line Shapefile. The population data for the council's 2014-2015 school districts does not correspond with the population data reported for the school districts reported by the Census Bureau. Modified by TEA to reflect the merger of La Marque ISD into Texas City ISD effective 01-JUL-2016. Maintenance of this data will normally consist of just uploading a new copy that you obtained from TLC.  However, should it ever be necessary to make changes to the data yourself, I *strongly* suggest you download it, modify the downloaded copy, then use the "Overwrite" button to the right to upload your changes and over-write the entire dataset.  While it is possible to edit the data using ArcGIS for desktop directly from this feature service, the process is clumsy since you cannot see all of the features at once.  Even worse--once you do that, the data cannot be subsequently over-written.  The data ends up being enabled for disconnected editing, which AGOL does to prevent you from stepping on someone else's potential offline edits. You then have to drop and re-publish the feature service, which means you have to then correct the URLs in the public open data site, and make sure the SDL map application can still find the data.  So, in practice it turns out to be way more trouble than it is worth to directly edit via the desktop.