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It is assumed that births are unevenly distributed throughout any given year, with the distribution influenced by such factors as climate, culture, and major economic and social events. But, is there evidence for this hypothesis? We at Knoema believe that the best evidence starts with data. So, we collected demographic statistics on the number of births monthly from January 2009 through December 2015 for two countries—Russia and the United States—to see what the data could tell us.

The data clearly shows that births are not randomly distributed throughout the year, instead births seem to correspond with climate and leisure conditions, which may influence parents’ desire to conceive children. 

  • In Russia and the United States a particular pattern repeats year after year, with July through October the busiest months for births.
  • July is the most common birth month in Russia, August in the United States. Children born in these months were conceived in November and December respectively when the weather is generally cooler and the populations in each country celebrate multiple national and religious holidays. 
  • February is the least common birth month in both countries.

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