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Over the past two decades, the United States has seen a significant decrease in crimeBetween 1991 and 2013 crime rate fell from 1,311 to 689 offenses per 100,000 population. In absolute terms, a number of crimes reduced by 8.5 million during the reference period from 28.3 million in 1991 to 19.8 million in 2013.

The estimated number of violent crimes in the nation decreased 0.2 percent in 2014 when compared with 2013 data, according to FBI figures. Property crimes decreased by 4.3 percent, marking the 12th straight year the collective estimates for these offenses declined.

The 2014 statistics show the estimated rate of violent crime was 365.5 offenses per 100,000 inhabitants, and the property crime rate was 2,596.1 offenses per 100,000 inhabitants. The violent crime rate declined 1.0 percent compared to the 2013 rate, and the property crime rate declined 5.0 percent.

In 2014, there were an estimated 1,165,383 violent crimes. Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter decreased 0.5 percent and robbery decreased 5.6 percent when compared with estimates from 2013. Rape (legacy definition) and aggravated assault, however, increased 2.4 percent and 2.0 percent, respectively.

Nationwide, there were an estimated 8,277,829 property crimes. The estimated numbers of each of the property crimes show declines when compared with the previous year’s estimates. Burglaries dropped 10.5 percent, larceny-thefts declined 2.7 percent, and motor vehicle thefts were down 1.5 percent.

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