An error occured. Details Hide
You have unsaved pages. Restore Cancel
 187    1   Export
More Actions

Knoema developed this special visualization series to highlight the variety of sources available to track and examine trends in various types of conflict and terrorism-related violence worldwide. Combined with traditional macroeconomic and sociodemographic information and even new indicators for social unrest and transformation, social scientists to security analysts to the average informed citizens now have easier and more reliable access to this valuable data type than ever before. At the bottom of each page, we offer live links to featured and additional conflict datasources. As always, each dataset includes links to the original data source so that you can learn more about the methodology used by sources to collect, verify, and categorize conflict information.

Armed Conflicts | Political ConflictsTerrorist Attacks 

Featured conflict data sources:

  1. The Uppsala Conflict Data Program (UCDP)
  2. A joint initiative of the University of Sussex and the University of Texas at Austin (Robert S Strauss Center) 

Definitions:

  • Armed conflict is defined by the UCDP as a contested incompatibility that concerns government and/or territory where the use of armed force between two parties, of which at least one is the government of a state, results in at least 25 battle-related deaths.
  • Violence against civilians occurs when any armed/violent group attacks civilians. By definition, civilians are unarmed and not engaged in political violence, rebels, governments, militias, rioters can all commit violence against civilians.
  • Conflict is assigned intensity level war if at least 1,000 battle-related deaths are recorded in a given year.
  • Four different types of conflicts are generaly identified: extrasystemic, interstate, internal and internationalized internal.
  • A non-state conflict is defined by UCDP as the use of armed force between two organized armed groups, neither of which is the government of a state, which results in at least 25 battle-related deaths in a year.
Last updated: