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Canada

  • Governor-General:David Johnston
  • Prime Minister:Justin Pierre James Trudeau
  • Capital city:Ottawa
  • Languages:English (official) 58.7%, French (official) 22%, Punjabi 1.4%, Italian 1.3%, Spanish 1.3%, German 1.3%, Cantonese 1.2%, Tagalog 1.2%, Arabic 1.1%, other 10.5% (2011 est.)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population:35,851,774 (2015)
  • Area:9,093,510 (2015)
  • GDP per capita:43,249 (2015)
  • GDP, current US$:1,550.5 (2015)
  • GINI index:33.68 (2010)
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:14 (2015)
All datasets:  2 3 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y
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    • July 2016
      Source: Knoema
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Accuracy of annual economic forecasts of international organizations - European Commission, IMF, OECD, World Bank, UN LINK
    • October 2011
      Source: Knoema
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Accuracy of annual economic forecasts of international organizations - European Commission, IMF, OECD, World Bank, UN LINK
    • November 2015
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 December, 2015
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      Activities of U.S. MNEs: Majority-Owned Foreign Affiliates, Selected Indicators
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 November, 2016
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      Adolescent fertility covers live births to women aged 15-19.A live birth is the complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of conception, irrespective of the duration of pregnancy, which after such separation breathes or shows any other evidence of life such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord or definite movement of voluntary muscles, whether or not the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta is attached.The adolescent fertility rate is the number of live births to women aged 15-19 per 1000 women aged 15-19.
    • June 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
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      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • January 2015
      Source: FDI Intelligence
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 December, 2015
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    • September 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 September, 2014
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      These tables are a complement to the report Agricultural Policies in OECD Countries: Monitoring and Evaluation 2009. They comprise the summary of agricultural support estimates for OECD countries.
    • July 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 December, 2015
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    • May 2016
      Source: Agricultural Market Information System
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Agricultural Market Information System
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Agricultural Market Information System
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 May, 2016
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    • May 2013
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2015
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    • May 2013
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2015
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    • May 2013
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2015
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    • May 2013
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2015
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    • May 2013
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 August, 2015
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    • May 2013
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2015
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    • May 2013
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2015
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    • June 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 August, 2015
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    • January 2015
      Source: Ministry of Tourism, Government of India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 May, 2016
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    • April 2016
      Source: Akamai
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 November, 2016
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    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 October, 2016
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      The “ALFS Summary tables” dataset is a subset of the Annual Labour Force Statistics database which presents annual labour force statistics and broad population series for 34 OECD member countries plus Brazil, Columbia and Russian Federation and 4 geographical areas (Major Seven, Euro area, European Union and OECD-Total). Data are presented in thousands of persons, in percentage or as indices with base year 2010=100.This dataset contains estimates from the OECD Secretariat for the latest years when countries did not provide data. These estimates are necessary to compile aggregated statistics for the geographical areas for a complete span of time. Since 2003, employment data by sector for the United States are compiled following the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS); therefore they are not strictly comparable with other countries’ data.Euro area and European Union data were extracted from Eurostat (LFS Series, Detailed annual survey results in New Cronos). Euro area refer to Euro area with 17 countries (geo = ea17). European Union refers to European Union with 27 countries (geo = eu27).
    • June 2013
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2014
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      This dataset includes combined and standardized Gini data from eight original sources: Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), Socio-Economic Database for Latin America (SEDLAC), Survey of Living Conditions (SILC) by Eurostat, World Income Distribution (WYD; the full data set is available here), World Bank Europe and Central Asia dataset, World Institute for Development Research (WIDER), World Bank Povcal, and Ginis from individual long-term inequality studies (just introduced in this version).
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2016
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      OECD Taxing Wages. Taxing Wages provides unique information on income tax paid by workers and social security contributions levied on employees and their employers in OECD countries. In addition, this annual publication specifies family benefits paid as cash transfers. Amounts of taxes and benefits are detailed program by program, for eight household types which differ by income level and household composition. Results reported include the marginal and effective tax burden for one- and two-earner families, and total labour costs of employers.
    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 May, 2016
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      The "ALFS Summary tables" dataset is a subset of the Annual Labor Force Statistics database which presents annual labor force statistics and broad population series for 34 OECD member countries plus Brazil and 4 geographical areas (Major Seven, Euro zone, European Union and OECD-Total). Note that Chile became a member of the OECD on 7 May 2010, Slovenia on 21 July 2010, Israel on 7 September 2010 and Estonia on 9 December 2010. Chile, Estonia, Israel and Slovenia have been included in this dataset. Data are presented in thousands of persons, in percentage or as indices with base year 2010=100.
    • November 2016
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2016
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      AMECO is the annual macro-economic database of the European Commission's Directorate General for Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN). The database is regularly cited in DG ECFIN's publications and is indispensable for DG ECFIN's analyses and reports. To ensure that DG ECFIN's analyses are verifiable and transparent to the public, AMECO data is made available free of charge. AMECO contains data for EU-27, the euro area, EU Member States, candidate countries and other OECD countries (United States, Japan, Canada, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Mexico, Korea, Australia and New Zealand).
    • October 2015
      Source: International Tropical Timber Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 June, 2016
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      ITTO's Annual Review and Assessment of the World Timber Situation compiles the most up-to-date and reliable international statistics available on global production and trade of timber, with an emphasis on the tropics. It also provides information on trends in forest area, forest management and the economies of ITTO member countries.
    • October 2016
      Source: National Association of Insurance Commissioners
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2016
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    • January 2014
      Source: World Resources Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2015
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      This dataset shows countries and river basins' average exposure to five of Aqueduct's water risk indicators: baseline water stress, interannual variability, seasonal variability, flood occurrence, and drought severity. Risk exposure scores are available for every country (except Greenland and Antarctica), the 100 most populous river basins, and the 100 largest river basins by area.Scores are also available for all industrial, agricultural, and domestic users' average exposure to each indicator in each country and river basin.
    • October 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 June, 2014
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:tour_occ_arnrmw National data Monthly and annual data on arrivals, nights spent and occupancy rates at tourist accommodation establishments. Regional data Annual arrivals, nights spent at tourist accommodation establishments at NUTS 2 level. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2016
      Source: Investment & Pensions Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 February, 2016
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      All Top 400 asset inflows and outflows for worldwide and external European institutional clients.
    • January 2017
      Source: Good Car Bad Car
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      U.S. sales figures for U.K. ,U.S. and Canada for the overall auto industry.
    • January 2017
      Source: Good Car Bad Car
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      Auto sales Summary based on Brand of montlhy and annual basis.
    • January 2017
      Source: Good Car Bad Car
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      Auto sales Summary based on Brand of montlhy and annual basis.
    • January 2017
      Source: Good Car Bad Car
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      Auto sales Summary based on corporations on montlhy and annual basis.
    • February 2016
      Source: Auto Care Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 February, 2016
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      U.S. Commercial Service Automotive Resource Guide, 2014 - Export.gov - Helping U.S. Companies Export Source: United States Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Foreign Trade Division. TPIS Database: USHS EXPORTS, Revised Statistics for 1989–2012.
    • October 2014
      Source: LMC Automotive
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 January, 2015
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      Automative Industry, 2014
    • January 2015
      Source: Center for Automotive Research
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 May, 2016
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      1.Data cited at AutoAlliance.org - http://www.autoalliance.org/files/dmfile/2015-Auto-Industry-Jobs-Report.pdf2. Light-Duty (0-6,000 lb)-Class 1    Light-Duty (6,001-10,000 lb)-Class 2    Medium-Duty (10,001-14,000 lb)-Class 3    Medium-Duty (14,001-16,000 lb)-Class 4    Medium-Duty (16,001-19,500 lb)-Class 5    Medium-Duty (19,501-26,000 lb)-Class 6    Heavy-Duty (26,001-33,000 lb)-Class 7    Heavy-Duty (33,001 lb and over)-Class 8
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2016
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      The concept used is the total number of hours worked over the year divided by the average number of people in employment. The data are intended for comparisons of trends over time; they are unsuitable for comparisons of the level of average annual hours of work for a given year, because of differences in their sources. Part-time workers are covered as well as full-time workers.The series on annual hours actually worked per person in total employment presented in this table for all 34 OECD countries are consistent with the series retained for the calculation of productivity measures in the OECD Productivity database (www.oecd.org/statistics/productivity/compendium). However, there may be some differences for some countries given that the main purpose of the latter database is to report data series on labour input (i.e. total hours worked) and also because the updating of databases occur at different moments of the year.Hours Hours actually worked per person in employment are according to National Accounts concepts for 18 countries: Austria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Korea, the Netherlands, Norway, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Turkey. OECD estimates for Belgium, Ireland, Luxembourg and Portugal for annual hours worked are based on the European Labour Force Survey, as are estimates for dependent employment only for Austria, Estonia, Greece, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia. The table includes labour-force-survey-based estimates for the Russian Federation.countries: For further details and country specfic notes see: www.oecd.org/employment/outlook and www.oecd.org/employment/emp/ANNUAL-HOURS-WORKED.pdf
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 October, 2016
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      This dataset contains data on average annual wages per full-time and full-year equivalent employee in the total economy. Average annual wages per full-time equivalent dependent employee are obtained by dividing the national-accounts-based total wage bill by the average number of employees in the total economy, which is then multiplied by the ratio of average usual weekly hours per full-time employee to average usually weekly hours for all employees. The data, from 1990 to 2012 are available in : 2012 USD exchange rates and 2012 constant prices Aggregation and consolidation Average wages are converted in USD PPPs using 2012 USD PPPs for private consumption and are deflated by a price deflator for private final consumption expenditures in 2012 prices. in 2012 constant prices and NCU in 2012 USD PPPs and 2012 constant prices in 2012 USD exchange rates and 2012
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 July, 2016
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      This table contains data on the average duration of unemployment by sex and standardised age groups (15-19, 15-24, 20-24, 25-54, 55+, total). Data are expressed in months.
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
  • B
    • January 2017
      Source: Baker Hughes
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 January, 2017
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    • September 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 January, 2017
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      The balance of payments is a statistical statement that provides a systematic summary of economic transactions of an economy with the rest of the world, for a specific time period. The transactions are for the most part between residents and non-residents of the economy. A transaction is defined as an economic flow that reflects the creation, transformation, exchange, transfer, or extinction of economic value and involves changes in ownership, of goods or assets, the provision of services, labour or capital. For countries compiling Balance of Payments Statistics in accordance with the 6th edition of the Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual published by the IMF (BPM6) as indicated in metadata at the country level, transactions include: the goods and services accounts, the primary income account (income account in BPM5), the secondary income account (transfers in BPM5), the capital account, and the financial account.                                                                                                                   For countries compiling Balance of Payments statistics in accordance with the 5th edition on the Balance of Payments Manual, transactions include: goods, services, and income; those involving financial claims on and liabilities to the rest of the world; and transfers.                                                                       Changes in BPM6 compared to BPM5 are often a consequence of a stricter application of the change of ownership principle in particular in the goods and services accounts. They relate to transactions on goods and services (merchanting, goods for processing, Insurance), income (investment income), and financial operations (direct investment). Seasonal adjustment - Where the seasonal adjustment has been carried out by the OECD, the X-12 Reg-ARIMA method is used.
    • February 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 February, 2015
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      Since the collection of 2009 data, the scope of the OECD Global Insurance Statistics questionnaire has been expanded. These changes led to the collection of key balance sheet and income statement items for direct insurance and reinsurance sectors, such as: gross claims paid, outstanding claims provision (changes), gross operating expenses, commissions, total assets, gross technical provisions (of which: unit-linked), shareholder equity, net income.
    • June 2015
      Source: Barro-Lee
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 October, 2015
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    • August 2015
      Source: Barro-Lee
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 October, 2015
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    • August 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 November, 2016
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      Better Life Index aims to involve citizens in the debate on measuring the well-being of societies, and to empower them to become more informed and engaged in the policy-making process that shapes all our lives. Each of the 11 topics of the Index is currently based on one to three indicators. Within each topic, the indicators are averaged with equal weights. The indicators have been chosen on the basis of a number of statistical criteria such as relevance (face-validity, depth, policy relevance) and data quality (predictive validity, coverage, timeliness, cross-country comparability etc.) and in consultation with OECD member countries. These indicators are good measures of the concepts of well-being, in particular in the context of a country comparative exercise. Other indicators will gradually be added to each topic.
    • December 2014
      Source: Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 December, 2015
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    • April 2014
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 February, 2016
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      UNCTAD's Bilateral FDI Statistics provides up-to-date and systematic FDI data for 206 economies around the world, covering inflows (table 1), outflows (table 2), inward stock (table 3) and outward stock (table 4) by region and economy. Data are in principle collected from national sources. In order to cover the entire world, where data are not available from national sources, data from partner countries (mirror data) as well as from other international organizations have also been used.
    • October 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2016
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      This data set provides a snapshot of migration and remittances for all countries, regions and income groups of the world, compiled from available data from various sources
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • January 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 May, 2016
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      Below Parameters are common for all combinations : Frequency - Quarterly Measure - Amounts Outstanding / Stocks CBS Bank Type - Domestic Banks CBS Reporting Basis - Immediate Counterparty Basis Balance Sheet Position - Total Claims Type of Instruments - All Instruments Remaining Maturity - All Maturities Currency Type of Booking Location - All Currencies Counterparty Sector - All Sectors
    • December 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
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    • January 2017
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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    • November 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
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    • November 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
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      The residential property price statistics collect data from different countries. The BIS has obtained permission from various national data providers, with the assistance of its member central banks, to disseminate these statistics. The topic ‘Property prices: Selected series,’ contains nominal and real quarterly values for 58 countries, both in levels and in growth rates (ie four series per country). Real series are the nominal price series deflated by the consumer price index. The BIS has made the selection based on the Handbook on Residential Property Prices and the experience and metadata of central banks.
    • January 2016
      Source: Bloomberg
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 May, 2016
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      Methodology:R&D intensity: Research and development expenditure, as % GDP.Manufacturing value-added: MVA, as GDP and per capita.Productivity: GDP per employed person age 15-F and 3V improvement.High-tech density: Number of domestically domiciled high-tech public companies — such as aerospace and defense, biotechnology, hardware, software, semiconductors, Internet software and services, and renewable energy companies — as % of domestic publicly listed companies and as a share of world's total public high-tech companies.Tertiary efficiency: Tertiary efficiency: Total enrollment in tertiary education, regardless of age, as % the post-secondary cohort; % labor force with tertiary degrees; annual new science and engineering graduates as % total tertiary graduates and as % of the labor force.Researcher concentration: Professionals, including postgraduate Ph.D, students, engaged in R&D per million population.Patent activity: Resident patent filings per million population and per $100 billion GDP; Patent grants as a snare of world total. All metrics are equally weighted. Metrics consisting of multiple factors were rescaled for countries void of some but not all data points, All sub-metrics were weighted equally. Most recent data available were used. Of the more than 200 economies evaluated, 84 had data available for at least six of the seven factors, and were ranked. Top 50 and the metric ranks among them are displayed,Sources: Bloomberg, International Monetary Fund, World sank, Organization for EconomicCooperation and Development. World Intellectual Property Organization, United Nations
    • June 2016
      Source: BP
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 June, 2016
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      The BP Statistical Review of World Energy has provided high-quality, objective and globally consistent data on world energy markets. The Review is one of the most widely respected and authoritative publications in the field of energy economics, used for reference by the media, academia, world governments and energy companies. A new edition is published every June. Historical data from 1965 for many sections.
    • June 2016
      Source: BP
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 June, 2016
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      The BP Statistical Review of World Energy has provided high-quality, objective and globally consistent data on world energy markets. The Review is one of the most widely respected and authoritative publications in the fi eld of energy economics, used for reference by the media, academia, world governments and energy companies. A new edition is published every June. Historical data from 1965 for many sections.
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 December, 2016
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      Data given in this domain are collected annually by the National Statistical Institutes and are based on Eurostat's annual model questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage in households and by individuals. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. ICT usage data are also used in the Consumer Conditions Scoreboard (purchases over the Internet) and in the Employment Guidelines (e-skills of individuals). The aim of the European ICT surveys is the timely provision of statistics on individuals and households on the use of Information and Communication Technologies at European level. Data for this collection are supplied directly from the surveys with no separate treatment. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects:access to and use of ICTs by individuals and/or in households,use of the Internet and other electronic networks for different purposes by individuals and/or in households,ICT security and trust,ICT competence and skills,barriers to the use of ICT and the Internet,perceived effects of ICT usage on individuals and/or on households,use of ICT by individuals to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),access to and use of technologies enabling connection to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns (see details of available breakdowns): Relating to households:by region of residence (NUTS 1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area) by type of householdby households net monthly income (optional) Relating to individuals:by region of residence (NUTS1, optional: NUTS 2)by geographical location: less developed regions, transition regions, more developed regionsby degree of urbanisation: (till 2012: densely/intermediate/sparsely populated areas; from 2012: densely/thinly populated area, intermediate density area)by genderby country of birth, country of citizenship (as of 2010, optional in 2010)by educational level: ISCED 1997 up to 2013 and ISCED 2011 from 2014 onwards.by occupation: manual, non-manual; ICT (coded by 2-digit ISCO categories)/non-ICT (optional: all 2-digit ISCO categories)by employment situationby age (in completed years and by groups)legal / de facto marital status (2011-2014, optional) Regional breakdowns (NUTS) are available only for a selection of indicators disseminated in the regional tables in Eurobase (Regional Information society statistics by NUTS regions (isoc_reg):Households with access to the internet at homeHouseholds with broadband accessIndividuals who have never used a computerIndividuals who used the internet, frequency of use and activitiesIndividuals who used the internet for interaction with public authoritiesIndividuals who ordered goods or services over the internet for private useIndividuals who accessed the internet away from home or work
    • June 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 March, 2016
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      The OECD broadband portal provides access to a range of broadband-related statistics gathered by the OECD. Policy makers must examine a range of indicators which reflect the status of individual broadband markets. The OECD broadband speed tests by country show the official measurements of actual access network broadband speed. The OECD broadband map shows national broadband statistics in OECD countries. Mobile broadband penetration has risen to 85.4% in the OECD area, meaning more than four wireless subscriptions for every five inhabitants, according to data for June 2015 released by the OECD .
    • June 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 March, 2016
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      The OECD broadband portal provides access to a range of broadband-related statistics gathered by the OECD. Policy makers must examine a range of indicators which reflect the status of individual broadband markets. The OECD broadband speed tests by country show the official measurements of actual access network broadband speed. The OECD broadband map shows national broadband statistics in OECD countries. Mobile broadband penetration has risen to 85.4% in the OECD area, meaning more than four wireless subscriptions for every five inhabitants, according to data for June 2015 released by the OECD .
    • June 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 March, 2016
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      The OECD broadband portal provides access to a range of broadband-related statistics gathered by the OECD. Policy makers must examine a range of indicators which reflect the status of individual broadband markets. The OECD broadband speed tests by country show the official measurements of actual access network broadband speed. The OECD broadband map shows national broadband statistics in OECD countries. Mobile broadband penetration has risen to 85.4% in the OECD area, meaning more than four wireless subscriptions for every five inhabitants, according to data for June 2015 released by the OECD .
    • June 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 March, 2016
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      The OECD broadband portal provides access to a range of broadband-related statistics gathered by the OECD. Policy makers must examine a range of indicators which reflect the status of individual broadband markets. The OECD broadband speed tests by country show the official measurements of actual access network broadband speed. The OECD broadband map shows national broadband statistics in OECD countries. Mobile broadband penetration has risen to 85.4% in the OECD area, meaning more than four wireless subscriptions for every five inhabitants, according to data for June 2015 released by the OECD .
    • June 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 March, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The OECD broadband portal provides access to a range of broadband-related statistics gathered by the OECD. Policy makers must examine a range of indicators which reflect the status of individual broadband markets. The OECD broadband speed tests by country show the official measurements of actual access network broadband speed. The OECD broadband map shows national broadband statistics in OECD countries. Mobile broadband penetration has risen to 85.4% in the OECD area, meaning more than four wireless subscriptions for every five inhabitants, according to data for June 2015 released by the OECD . Note: unit of measure of indicators related to Internet selling and purchasing by industry is percentage of businesses with 10 or more employees in each industry group.
    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 May, 2016
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    • April 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 August, 2015
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics performed in the business enterprise sector by industry according to the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) revision 3.1. Data at the industry level are presented beginning 1987, year when most of the countries converted from ISIC rev.2 to the current ISIC rev. 3 classification. This breakdown between industries is, in principle, made at the enterprise level, although some countries are able to break down R&D data for multi product enterprises between their main lines of business. National statistical regulations prevent publication of results where there are very few firms in the given category, hence the many gaps in the tables. Depending on the country, R&D institutes serving enterprises are either classified with the industry concerned, or grouped under “Research and Development” (ISIC rev.3.1, Division 73). When these R&D institutes are classified with the industry served, the evaluation of R&D in these industries is more complete and more comparable between countries for the industries concerned. This results, however, in an underestimation of the percentage of BERD performed by the service sector as compared with other countries. The Frascati Manual recommendation concerning data on R&D by industry is to report BERD on an enterprise basis (see FM section 3.4). When this is interpreted strictly, all the BERD of a diversified enterprise will be allocated to the industrial class of its principal activity. In circumstances where a few large firms dominate R&D spending in several areas, this can and does lead to underestimates of R&D associated with the secondary activities of the firms. Overall, R&D is therefore overestimated for some industries and underestimated for others. However, not all countries follow a strict enterprise basis for allocating R&D expenditures to industrial classes. Some countries make a disaggregation of the R&D of their largest, diversified firms into a number of different activities. In other countries, the enterprise approach has been abandoned and data are reported on a product field basis. This is why two classification criteria for BERD by industry are included in this view of “BERD by industry” (see the variable CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA: Main activity or Product field) depending on which approach is more closely followed by each country (only a few countries currently collect these data both ways and are therefore included according to both criteria)). The two tables that follow, “BERD by industry and source of funds” and “BERD by industry and type of costs” present data for only one of the criteria, depending on the country.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics performed in the business enterprise sector by industry according to the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) revision 3.1. and by source of funds (business enterprise, government, other national funds, and funds from abroad). Data at the industry level are presented beginning 1987, year when most of the countries converted from ISIC rev.2 to the current ISIC rev. 3 classification. This breakdown between industries is, in principle, made at the enterprise level, although some countries are able to break down R&D data for multi product enterprises between their main lines of business. National statistical regulations prevent publication of results where there are very few firms in the given category, hence the many gaps in the tables. Depending on the country, R&D institutes serving enterprises are either classified with the industry concerned, or grouped under “Research and Development” (ISIC rev.3.1, Division 73). When these R&D institutes are classified with the industry served, the evaluation of R&D in these industries is more complete and more comparable between countries for the industries concerned. This results, however, in an underestimation of the percentage of BERD performed by the service sector as compared with other countries. The Frascati Manual recommendation concerning data on R&D by industry is to report BERD on an enterprise basis (see FM section 3.4). When this is interpreted strictly, all the BERD of a diversified enterprise will be allocated to the industrial class of its principal activity. In circumstances where a few large firms dominate R&D spending in several areas, this can and does lead to underestimates of R&D associated with the secondary activities of the firms. Overall, R&D is therefore overestimated for some industries and underestimated for others. However, not all countries follow a strict enterprise basis for allocating R&D expenditures to industrial classes. Some countries make a disaggregation of the R&D of their largest, diversified firms into a number of different activities. In other countries, the enterprise approach has been abandoned and data are reported on a product field basis. This is why two classification criteria for BERD by industry are included in the table “BERD by industry” (see the variable CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA: Main activity or Product field) depending on which approach is more closely followed by each country (only a few countries currently collect these data both ways and are therefore included according to both criteria). However, this table “BERD by industry and source of funds” and the one that follows, “BERD by industry and type of costs” present data for only one of the criteria, depending on the country.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2000 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics performed in the business enterprise sector by industry according to the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) revision 3.1. and by type of costs (current expenditure, capital expenditure). Data at the industry level are presented beginning 1987, year when most of the countries converted from ISIC rev.2 to the current ISIC rev. 3 classification. This breakdown between industries is, in principle, made at the enterprise level, although some countries are able to break down R&D data for multi product enterprises between their main lines of business. National statistical regulations prevent publication of results where there are very few firms in the given category, hence the many gaps in the tables. Depending on the country, R&D institutes serving enterprises are either classified with the industry concerned, or grouped under “Research and Development” (ISIC rev.3.1, Division 73). When these R&D institutes are classified with the industry served, the evaluation of R&D in these industries is more complete and more comparable between countries for the industries concerned. This results, however, in an underestimation of the percentage of BERD performed by the service sector as compared with other countries. The Frascati Manual recommendation concerning data on R&D by industry is to report BERD on an enterprise basis (see FM section 3.4). When this is interpreted strictly, all the BERD of a diversified enterprise will be allocated to the industrial class of its principal activity. In circumstances where a few large firms dominate R&D spending in several areas, this can and does lead to underestimates of R&D associated with the secondary activities of the firms. Overall, R&D is therefore overestimated for some industries and underestimated for others. However, not all countries follow a strict enterprise basis for allocating R&D expenditures to industrial classes. Some countries make a disaggregation of the R&D of their largest, diversified firms into a number of different activities. In other countries, the enterprise approach has been abandoned and data are reported on a product field basis. This is why two classification criteria for BERD by industry are included in the table “BERD by industry” (see the variable CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA: Main activity or Product field) depending on which approach is more closely followed by each country (only a few countries currently collect these data both ways and are therefore included according to both criteria). However, this table “BERD by industry and type of costs” and the preceding one “BERD by industry and source of funds” present data for only one of the criteria, depending on the country.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 November, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2010 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics performed in the business enterprise sector. Data include total business enterprise intramural expenditure on R&D by size class and source of funds.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 May, 2016
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      This table presents research and development (R&D) statistics on personnel in the business enterprise sector. Measured in full-time equivalent are the number of total R&D personnel and researchers in the business enterprise sector by industry according to the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) revision 3.1. Data at the industry level are presented beginning 1987, year when most of the countries converted from ISIC rev.2 to the current ISIC rev. 3 classification.
    • June 2014
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 January, 2015
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      The business rankings model measures the quality or attractiveness of the business environment in the 82 countries covered by The Economist Intelligence Unit’s Country Forecast reports. It is designed to reflect the main criteria used by companies to formulate their global business strategies, and is based not only on historical conditions but also on expectations about conditions prevailing over the next five years. This allows the Economist Intelligence Unit to utilise the regularity, depth and detail of its forecasting work to generate a unique set of forward-looking business environment rankings on a regional and global basis.
    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 January, 2017
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      The business tendency survey indicators cover a standard set of indicators for four economic sectors: manufacturing, construction, retail trade and other services. This includes an indicator of overall business conditions or business confidence in each sector. The consumer opinion survey indicators cover a restricted set of indicators on consumer confidence, expected economic situation and price expectations.Business and consumer opinion (tendency) surveys provide qualitative information that has proved useful for monitoring the current economic situation. Typically they are based on a sample of enterprises or households and respondents are asked about their assessments of the current situation and expectations for the immediate future. For enterprise surveys this concerns topics such as production, orders, stocks etc. and in the case of consumer surveys their intentions concerning major purposes, economic situation now compared with the recent past and expectations for the immediate future. Many survey series provide advance warning of turning points in aggregate economic activity as measured by GDP or industrial production. Such series are known as leading indicators in cyclical analysis. These types of survey series are widely used as component series in composite leading indicators. The main characteristic of these types of surveys is that instead of asking for exact figures, they usually ask for the direction of change e.g. a question on tendency by reference to a “normal” state, e.g. of production level. Possible answers are generally of the three point scale type e.g. up/same/down or above normal/normal/below normal for enterprise surveys and of the five point scale type e.g. increase sharply/increase slightly/remain the same/fall slightly/fall sharply for consumer surveys. In presenting the results as a time series, only the balance is shown. That is “same” or “normal” answers are ignored and the balance is obtained by taking the difference between percentages of respondents giving favourable and unfavourable answers.Virtually all business tendency and consumer opinion survey data are presented as time series of balances in this dataset, either in raw or seasonally adjusted form. Very few series are presented as indices, and where these exist they have generally been converted from underlying balances by countries before submitting the data to the OECD.  
    • December 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 September, 2016
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      Institutional coverage As a consequence of the implementation of the new OECD Global Insurance Statistics' framework, there is a break in series between 2008 and 2009 regarding life and non-life business data where composite insurance undertakings exist. Up until 2008, the insurance business is broken down between life and non-life business. As of 2009, the insurance business is broken down between the business of pure life, pure non-life and composite undertakings and composite undertakings' business is further broken down between life and non-life business. Some countries do not allow for insurance undertakings to be active in both life and non-life insurance business and therefore composite insurance undertakings do not exist in these countries. In other countries (e.g., Austria, Belgium, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Spain) however, the share of employment in composite insurance undertakings accounts for more than half of the whole domestic insurance sector. Therefore, to have comparable data across years for life business data (resp. non-life), one has to sum up the life (resp. non-life) business of pure life (resp. non-life) undertakings and the life (resp. non-life) business of composite undertakings as of 2009. Item coverage Business written in the reporting country on a gross and net premium basis. It contains a breakdown between domestic companies, foreign-controlled companies and branches and agencies or foreign companies.
    • February 2012
      Source: Federal State Statistics Service, Russia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Внешняя торговля товарами Российской Федерации по странам партнерам, 1995-2011
  • C
    • December 2015
      Source: World Resources Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 February, 2016
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      CAIT Historic allows for easy access, analysis and visualization of the latest available international greenhouse gas emissions data. It includes information for 186 countries, 50 U.S. states, 6 gases, multiple economic sectors, and 160 years - carbon dioxide emissions for 1850-2012 and multi-sector greenhouse gas emission for 1990-2012.
    • December 2013
      Source: Government of Canada
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2013
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      The purpose of the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) is to provide information about Canadian adults whose daily activities are limited because of a long-term condition or health-related problem. This information will be used to plan and evaluate services, programs and policies for adults with disabilities to help enable their full participation in Canadian society. The Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD) gathers information about Canadians aged 15 and over whose daily activities are limited due to a long-term condition or health-related problem. The survey collects information on: type and severity of disability, use of aids and assistive devices, help received or required, educational attainment, labour force status, experiences and accommodations at school or work, and ability to get around the community. Present dataset contains the following data: activity limitations experienced by individuals as a result of physical or mental conditions or health problems; the impact these limitations have on day-to-day life; help used or needed as a result of limitations, including specialized equipment and aids.
    • April 2015
      Source: Statistics Canada
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 April, 2015
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      Canada Regional Dataset, April 2015
    • October 2015
      Source: Statistics Canada
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 October, 2015
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      Dataset provides information on the Canadian Population with a Disability, Type of Disability, and Children with a Disability
    • December 2016
      Source: Statistics Canada
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2016
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    • January 2016
      Source: National Energy Board, Government of Canada
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 February, 2016
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      Canada’s Energy Future 2016: Energy Supply and Demand Projections to 2040 (EF 2016) continues a long tradition of energy outlooks which the National Energy Board has been producing regularly since 1967. The only publicly available Canadian long-term energy outlook covering all energy commodities and all provinces and territories, this series provides Canadians a key reference point for discussing the country's energy future. This outlook relies on the extensive energy market expertise of the Board’s technical staff. In addition, energy experts from government, industry, environmental organizations and academia across Canada provided input on the preliminary assumptions and results of this outlook.
    • October 2016
      Source: International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2016
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      OICA Car Production Statistics 1999-2012 contains world motor vehicle production statistics, obtained from national trade organisations, OICA members or correspondents. Passenger cars are motor vehicles with at least four wheels, used for the transport of passengers, and comprising no more than eight seats in addition to the driver's seat. Commercial vehicles include light commercial vehicles, heavy trucks, coaches and buses.
    • August 2013
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2014
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      Transactions within the international production network and imports and exports of final goods and services can be estimated by using an inter-country economic model based on multi-regional input-output (MRIO) modelling techniques. In order to achieve this, national Input-Output tables are first converted to a common currency (nominal USD) and the import matrices are disaggregated to separate bilateral flows of goods and services. A range of adjustments to deal with measurement issues such as re-exports; unspecified partners and commodities; and missing data, particularly for trade in services, are necessary before the analysis.
    • January 2008
      Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      In summary, this database provides estimates of regional and global net carbon fluxes, on a year-by-year basis from 1850 through 2005, resulting from changes in land use (such as harvesting of forest products and clearing for agriculture), taking into account not only the initial removal and oxidation of the carbon in the vegetation, but also subsequent regrowth and changes in soil carbon. The net flux of carbon to the atmosphere from changes in land use from 1850 to 2005 was modeled as a function of documented land-use change and changes in aboveground and belowground carbon following changes in land use.
    • January 2016
      Source: Investment & Pensions Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 February, 2016
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      Cash, currency, hedge funds, private equity tables 2015
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Central bank board members by sex, 2016
    • December 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The data are central government bond yields which are no longer updated.
    • December 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The data are central government bond yields which are no longer updated.
    • December 2010
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The data are central government bond yields which are no longer updated.
    • July 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 August, 2014
      Select Dataset
      Note:  The updates and revisions for the OECD Central Government Debt Database have been suspended. This dataset is no longer updated. For more info, please read http://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=GOV_DEBT   Statistical population The focus of this dataset is to provide comprehensive quantitative information on marketable and non-marketable central government debt instruments in all OECD member countries. The coverage of the data is limited to central government debt issuance and excludes therefore state and local government debt and social security funds.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      6This table reports statutory central government personal income tax rates for wage income plus the taxable income thresholds at which these statutory rates apply. The table also reports basic/standard tax allowances, tax credits and surtax rates. The information is applicable to a single person without dependents. The threshold, tax allowance and tax credit amounts are expressed in national currencies Tapered means that the tax relief basic amount is reduced with increasing income Further explanatory notes may be found in the Explanatory Annex This data represents part of the data presented within the Excel file “Personal income tax rates and thresholds for central governments - Table I.1”. The Data for 1981 to 1999 is not included here within as not all the data for these years is either available, or can be verified. The OECD tax database provides comparative information on a range of tax statistics - tax revenues, personal income taxes, non-tax compulsory payments, corporate and capital income taxes and taxes on consumption - that are levied in the 34 OECD member countries.” Tax policy Analysis homepage OECD Tax Database Taxing Wages Dissemination format(s) This data is also presented through the OECD Tax database webpage. OECD Tax Database
    • March 2016
      Source: German Chemicals Industry Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 April, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Chemistry facts and figures 2015: Foreign Trade
    • March 2016
      Source: German Chemicals Industry Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 April, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Chemistry facts and figures 2015: Investments
    • July 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 October, 2015
      Select Dataset
    • January 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 September, 2016
      Select Dataset
    • December 2012
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 September, 2016
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    • August 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 August, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Institutional coverage As a consequence of the implementation of the new OECD Global Insurance Statistics' framework, there is a break in series between 2008 and 2009 regarding life and non-life business data where composite insurance undertakings exist. Up until 2008, the insurance business is broken down between life and non-life business. As of 2009, the insurance business is broken down between the business of pure life, pure non-life and composite undertakings and composite undertakings' business is further broken down between life and non-life business. Some countries do not allow for insurance undertakings to be active in both life and non-life insurance business and therefore composite insurance undertakings do not exist in these countries. In other countries (e.g., Austria, Belgium, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Spain) however, the share of employment in composite insurance undertakings accounts for more than half of the whole domestic insurance sector. Therefore, to have comparable data across years for life business data (resp. non-life), one has to sum up the life (resp. non-life) business of pure life (resp. non-life) undertakings and the life (resp. non-life) business of composite undertakings as of 2009. Item coverage Commissions in the reporting country, containing a breakdown between domestic companies, foreign-controlled companies and branches and agences of foreign companies.
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2015
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    • March 2016
      Source: UNESCO Institute for Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2016
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    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Designs. Community Design refer to design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trade marks and Designs. A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • June 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 June, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • June 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 June, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the "identity" of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • June 2012
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 September, 2014
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      The OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2012 presents, in a series of country profiles, the main features, strengths and weaknesses of national STI systems and major recent changes in national STI policy. The statistical dimension of the country profiles has drawn on the work and empirical research conducted by the OECD on the measurement of innovation and the development of internationally comparable STI indicators for policy analysis.   
    • December 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 May, 2014
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:educ_bo_ou_comp The Bologna declaration was signed in 1999 by 29 European ministers responsible for higher education. Today, 46 signatory countries are engaged in the process towards a European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The Bologna Process is an intergovernmental initiative which also involves the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO-CEPES, as well as representatives of higher education institutions, students, staff, employers and quality assurance agencies. It aims to create a European Higher Education Area by 2010, and to promote the European system of higher education worldwide. More information on the Bologna process is available on http://ec.europa.eu/education/higher-education/doc1290_en.htm. Many indicators on social dimension and mobility in the Bologna process come from the UOE data collection in the education statistics domain. The completion rate (educ_bo_ou_comp) was computed in the framework of the UOE data collection (jointly carried out by Unesco, OECD and Eurostat), but is usually disseminated by OECD only. The methodology for estimating completion rates varies across countries. They can use three methods: the cross-section method, the true cohort method, or the synthetic cohort method (see section 11.1 below for more details). The year of reference gives the reference year for the number of graduates. The estimation assumes constant student flows at the tertiary level, owing to the need for consistency between the graduate cohort in the reference year and the entrant cohort n years before. This assumption may be an oversimplification. Results are less reliable in systems in which enrolments fluctuate markedly, or students are faced with many different options as regards the length of courses for which they may enrol or in which there are many changes in programmes between the years of admission and graduation respectively. The inclusion of foreign students in the new entrant questionnaire can have an impact on the completion rates indicator. In some countries, the proportion of foreign students represents a large part of tertiary population, and all of them are considered as new entrants in tertiary education (as advised in UOE Guidelines) whereas most of them won't be graduated at this level of education. The consequence is to underestimate the completion rates in those countries with relatively large proportions of foreign students enrolled in tertiary education.
    • February 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 September, 2016
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      This table provides information on number of exported/imported products, concentration and diversification indices by country. The concentration index shows how exports and imports of individual countries or group of countries are concentrated on several products or otherwise distributed in a more homogeneous manner among a series of products. The diversification index signals whether the structure of exports or imports by product of a given country or group of countries differ from the structure of product of the world.   1. Concentration index:Concentration index, also knows as Herfindahl-Hirschmann Index (Product HHI), is a measure of the degree of product concentration. An index value closer to 1 indicates a country's exports or imports are highly concentrated on a few products. On the contrary, values closer to 0 reflect exports or imports are more homogeneously distributed among a series of products. 2. Diversification index:The diversification index is computed by measuring the absolute deviation of the trade structure of a country from world structure. The diversification index takes values between 0 and 1. A value closer to 1 indicates greater divergence of export and import from the world pattern. On the contrary closer to 0 indicates no divergence from the world pattern.
    • October 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2016
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    • October 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2016
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    • August 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2016
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      The Financial balance sheet, which completes the sequence of the accounts and gives a picture of their financial net worth at the end of the accounting period, records the stocks of the financial assets and liabilities held by the institutional sectors, at the end of the period.As a general principal, the valuation of the financial assets and liabilities are at market value, which is the basic reference for valuation in the SNA.   Note: Data is not seasonally adjusted
    • September 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 October, 2016
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      Data is not seasonally adjusted As a general rule in national accounts, the financial flows have to be recorded on a non-consolidated basis. However, consolidation data can be more significant for certain kind of analysis.In Subject 610Q, data are reported on a consolidated basis, which means that counterparts’ transactions of financial assets or liabilities of sub-sectors of the same sector and of institutional units of the same sub-sector are eliminated.As a general principal, the valuation of the financial assets and liabilities are at market value, which is the basic reference for valuation in the SNA.Definitions and concepts are currently in line with the 1993 System of national Accounts (SNA 1993) (see 1993sna.pdf link). For the new 2008 SNA, which will be implemented as from 2014, see SNA2008.pdf link. French version, forthcoming (see sna2008.asp link).Unit of measure used - Statistics are reported at current prices in millions of national currency.  
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2016
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      Constitutional court members by sex, 2016
    • January 2017
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 January, 2017
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    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 January, 2017
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      The 'Consumer Prices (MEI)' dataset contains predominantly monthly statistics, and associated statistical methodological information, for the 34 OECD member countries and for some non-member countries. The ‘Consumer Prices (MEI)’ dataset itself contains statistics on Consumer Price Indices. The data series presented have been chosen as the most relevant prices statistics in the MEI database for which comparable data across countries is available. In all cases a lot of effort has been made to ensure that the data are internationally comparable across all countries presented and that all the subjects have good historical time-series’ data to aid with analysis. Data are available monthly for all the countries except for Australia and New Zealand (quarterly data), and are presented as an index where the year 2010 is the base year.
    • December 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 April, 2016
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      The CDIS database presents detailed data on "inward" direct investment positions (i.e. direct investment into the reporting economy) cross-classified by economy of immediate investor and data on "outward" direct investment positions (i.e. direct investment abroad by the reporting economy) cross-classified by economy of immediate investment. The CDIS database contains breakdowns of direct investment position data including in most instances separate data on net equity and net debt positions as well as tables that present "mirror" data (i.e. tables in which data from the reporting economy are shown side-by-side with the data obtained from all other counterpart reporting economies).
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2016
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications / granted to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications / granted to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2016
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications / granted to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications / granted to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.
    • July 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • January 2016
      Source: Transparency International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 January, 2016
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      Transparency International(TI) defines corruption as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. This definition encompasses corrupt practices in both the public and private sectors. The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranks countries according to the perception of corruption in the public sector. The CPI is an aggregate indicator that combines different sources of information about corruption, making it possible to compare countries. The CPI ranks almost 200 countries by their perceived levels of corruption, as determined by expert assessments and opinion surveys.
    • March 2016
      Source: Numbeo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 April, 2016
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    • April 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 August, 2015
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      Global growth is forecast at 3.5 percent in 2015 and 3.8 percent in 2016, with uneven prospects across the main countries and regions of the world. The distribution of risks to near-term global growth has become more balanced relative to the October World Economic Outlook but is still tilted to the downside. The decline in oil prices could boost activity more than expected. Geopolitical tensions continue to pose threats, and risks of disruptive shifts in asset prices remain relevant. In some advanced economies, protracted low inflation or deflation also pose risks to activity. The chapter takes a region-by-region look at the recent development in the world economy and the outlook for 2015, with particular attention to notable development in countries within each region.
    • November 2015
      Source: Bloom Consulting
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 May, 2016
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      The United States of America remains number one in both the region and the world, challenged distantly by its ever-growing neighbors, Canada and Mexico, ranking second and third respectively within the Americas. Its incredible economic performance in terms of tourism receipts, almost 10 times larger than its main competitor Canada, makes the USA the absolute leader in the region despite its poorer online performance, especially in social media.
    • July 2016
      Source: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 August, 2016
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      Reports - Statistical Releases E.16 Country Exposure Lending Survey and Country Exposure Information Report
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 November, 2016
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      Country Programmable Aid (CPA), outlined in our Development Brief  and also known as “core” aid, is the portion of aid donors programme for individual countries, and over which partner countries could have a significant say. CPA is much closer than ODA to capturing the flows of aid that goes to the partner country, and has been proven in several studies to be a good proxy of aid recorded at country level. CPA was developed in 2007 in close collaboration with DAC members. It is derived on the basis of DAC statistics and was retroactively calculated from 2000 onwards
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2016
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      Country Programmable Aid (CPA), outlined in our Development Brief  and also known as “core” aid, is the portion of aid donors programme for individual countries, and over which partner countries could have a significant say. CPA is much closer than ODA to capturing the flows of aid that goes to the partner country, and has been proven in several studies to be a good proxy of aid recorded at country level. CPA was developed in 2007 in close collaboration with DAC members. It is derived on the basis of DAC statistics and was retroactively calculated from 2000 onwards
    • March 2012
      Source: Knoema
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Country Risk Assessment Database, 2012. Source: Multiple Sources - EuroStat, WB, IMF, OECD, UNCTAD
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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    • April 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 April, 2016
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      COFR presents data on fiscal transparency. It provides an overview of fiscal reporting, including whether fiscal data are available for all of the general government, whether the government reports a balance sheet, and whether spending and revenue are reported on a cash or accrual basis. It also derives specific indices of the coverage of public institutions, fiscal flows, and fiscal stocks.
    • December 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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      All series on credit to the non-financial sector cover 46 economies, both advanced and emerging. They capture the outstanding amount of credit at the end of the reference quarter. Credit is provided by domestic banks, all other sectors of the economy and non-residents. In terms of financial instruments, credit covers the core debt, defined as loans, debt securities and currency & deposits.
    • October 2013
      Source: ESPN Cricinfo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2013
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      Cricket Statistics, 2013
    • December 2015
      Source: Numbeo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 March, 2016
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    • February 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 December, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:crim_hist Data on crime (offences recorded by the police - total crime, homicide, violent crime, robbery, domestic burglary, theft of a motor vehicle, drug trafficking), the number of police officers and the prison population are available at country level for European Union Member States, EFTA countries, EU Candidate countries, and EU Potential Candidates. Data on homicide is also available by capital cities (police areas) in these countries. Data for the United Kingdom (England & Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) appears separately owing to the existence of three separate jurisdictions. The data come from official sources in the countries such as the National Statistics Office, the National Prison Administration, the Ministries of the Interior or Justice and the Police. Calendar year or national financial year data are provided in absolute numbers. No statistical adjustments are carried out. Regional data : Data on domestic burglary, homicide, robbery and theft of motor vehicle are available on a regional level for 2008, 2009 and 2010 only. The data are available for the European Union member States, EFTA countries, EU Candidate countries and EU Potential candidates. Please note that for paragraphs where non metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.
    • February 2013
      Source: RAND Corporation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2015
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      This report describes the results of a study of the sources and reliability of the supply of imported materials on which United States manufacturers are dependent. It should be of interest to a broad spectrum of individuals and organizations in the materials and manufacturing sectors as well as government, private sector, and non-profit organizations involved with or concerned about those sectors. This research was sponsored by the National Intelligence Council and conducted within the Intelligence Policy Center of the RAND National Defense Research Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the Unified Combatant Commands, the Navy, the Marine Corps, the defense agencies, and the defense Intelligence Community
    • January 2017
      Source: Pan American Health Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      1. Incidence rate (autochthonous suspected + autochthonous confirmed) / 100,000 population.2. Deaths among Zika cases do not include deaths related to Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) or congenital malformations associated with Zika virus infection. As of 12 May 2016, previously reported deaths related to GBS were removed from this total.3. Confirmed congenital syndrome associated with Zika virus infection case definition: Live newborn who meets the criteria for a suspected case of congenital syndrome associated with Zika virus AND Zika virus infection was detected in specimens of the newborn, regardless of detection of other pathogens
    • July 2015
      Source: Center for World University Rankings
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2015
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      The Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) publishes the only global university ranking that measures the quality of education and training of students as well as the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions.
  • D
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      Death rate by causes of death and sex, 2013
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2016
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      This dataset contains three earnings-dispersion measures - ratio of 9th-to-1st, 9th-to-5th and 5th-to-1st - where ninth, fifth (or median) and first deciles are upper-earnings decile limits, unless otherwise indicated, of gross earnings of full-time dependent employees. The dataset also includes series on:the incidence of low-paid workers defined as the share of full-time workers earning less than two-thirds of gross median earnings of all full-time workers;the incidence of high of high-paid workers defined as the share of full-time workers earning more than one-and-half time gross median earnings of all full-time workers;gender wage gap unadjusted and defined as the difference between median wages of men and women relative to the median wages of men.
    • May 2016
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 June, 2016
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      1. The Democracy Index is based on five categories: electoral process and pluralism; civil liberties; the functioning of government; political participation; and political culture. Based on their scores on a range of indicators within these categories, each country is then itself categorized as one of four types of regime: “full democracies”; “flawed democracies”; “hybrid regimes”; and “authoritarian regimes”.2. Categorization of country based on overall score (on scale of 0 to 10)10≤Full Democracies≤88
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 April, 2016
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      The objective of this dataset is to trace net changes in terms of volume in the growing stock of standing wood on forest land. It shows data underlying the indicator on the intensity of use of forest resources. This indicator relates actual fellings to annual productive capacity (i.e. gross increment). Forest depletion and growth describe balances or imbalances in different types of forests. The intensity of use of forest resources reflects various forest management methods and their sustainability. These data should be read in connection with other indicators of the OECD Core Set, in particular with indicators on land use changes and forest quality (species diversity, forest degradation), and be complemented with data on forest management practices and protection measures. In interpreting these data, it should be borne in mind that definitions and estimation methods vary among countries.
    • February 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 February, 2015
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      As a consequence of the implementation of the new OECD Global Insurance Statistics' framework, there is a break in series between 2008 and 2009 regarding life and non-life business datawhere composite insurance undertakings exist. Up until 2008, the insurance business is broken down between life and non-life business. As of 2009, the insurance business is broken down between the business of pure life, pure non-life and composite undertakings and composite undertakings' business is further broken down between life and non-life business. Some countries do not allow for insurance undertakings to be active in both life and non-life insurance business and therefore composite insurance undertakings do not exist in these countries. In other countries (e.g., Austria, Belgium, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Spain) however, the share of employment in composite insurance undertakings accounts for more than half of the whole domestic insurance sector. Therefore, to have comparable data across years for life business data (resp. non-life), one has to sum up the life (resp. non-life) business of pure life (resp. non-life) undertakings and the life (resp. non-life) business of composite undertakings as of 2009. Click to collapse Item coverage Outstanding investment by direct insurance companies, classified by investment category, by the companies' nationality and by its destination (domestic or foreign). As of 2009, investment data exclude assets linked to unit-linked products sold to policyholders.
    • March 2016
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2016
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      Financing Global Health 2015 is the seventh edition of IHME’s annual series on global health financing. This report captures trends in development assistance for health (DAH) and government health expenditure as source (GHE-S) in low- and middle-income countries. Annually updated GHE-S and DAH estimates are produced to aid decision-makers and other global health stakeholders in identifying funding gaps and investment opportunities vital to improving population health. This year, IHME made a number of improvements to the data collection and methods implemented to generate Financing Global Health estimates.
    • May 2007
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2015
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      The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) is the only index that includes price data for 181 economies, which is vital in assessing effective market demand. The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) has been designed to as a tool for tracking progress in bridging the digital divide and the implementa- tion of the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS). As such, it provides a powerful policy tool for exploring the global and regional trends in infrastructure, opportu- nity and usage that are shaping the Information Society.
    • July 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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      Direct Investment Abroad: Financial Transactions without Current-Cost Adjustment, United States 2015
    • July 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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      Direct Investment Abroad: Reinvestment of Earnings Without Current Cost Adjustment, United States 2015
    • July 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2016
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      Direct Investment Position Abroad on a Historical-Cost Basis:  Country Detail by Industry, United States 2015
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2016
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      It presents the different transactions and balances to get from the GDP to the net lending/net borrowing. Therefore, it includes, in particular, national disposable income (gross and net), consumption of fixed capital as well as net saving.
    • September 2012
      Source: Americans for Divorce Reform
      Uploaded by: Carpe Facto
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      Divorce Indicators across countries
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 April, 2016
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      1. ccTLDs stands for country code Top Level Domains.2. gTLDs - stands for generic top-level domains.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • January 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 March, 2016
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    • December 2008
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Peter Speyer
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      IHME research, published in the Lancet in 2008. The study, Tracking progress towards universal childhood immunizations and the impact of global initiatives, provides estimates with confidence intervals of the coverage of three-dose diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTP3) vaccination. The estimates take into account all publicly available data, including data from routine reporting systems and nationally representative surveys.
  • E
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 December, 2016
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    • December 2010
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      This dataset provides an overview of the most recent and pertinent annual energy related statistics in Europe. The data is drawn from several sources: the European Commission’s services; international organisations, such as the European Environment Agency and the International Energy Agency and, where no data is currently available, from the European Commission’s estimations. The indicator calculations follow the methodology established by the European Commission - DG Energy.
    • October 2016
      Source: Fraser Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2016
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      The economic freedom index measures the degree of economic freedom present in five major areas: [1] Size of Government; [2] Legal System and Security of Property Rights; [3] Sound Money; [4] Freedom to Trade Internationally; [5] Regulation. Within the five major areas, there are 24 components (area) in economic freedom index. Each component and sub-component is placed on a scale from 0 to 10.
    • May 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 May, 2014
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      The OECD Long Term Baseline analyzes the major economic trends beyond the OECD short-term projections. For all OECD economies, and the major non-OECD economies, it provides coverage of components of potential growth, fiscal balances and debt accumulation, domestic saving and investment balances, and external balances (through the current account). It also includes interest rates consistent with those projections. The database contains annual data to 2060. Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible for the countries covered. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD statistical publications such as the Annual National Accounts, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations, and Eurostat.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 January, 2017
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      The OECD Economic Outlook analyses the major economic trends over the coming 2 to 3 years. It provides in-depth coverage of the main economic issues and the policy measures required to foster growth in each member country. Forthcoming developments in major non-OECD economies are also evaluated in detail. Each edition of the Outlook provides a unique resource to keep abreast of world economic developments. The OECD Economic Outlook database is a comprehensive and consistent macroeconomic database of the OECD economies, covering expenditures, foreign trade, output, labour markets, interest and exchange rates, balance of payments, and government debt. For the non-OECD regions, foreign trade and current account series are available. The database contains annual for the projection period. Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible for the countries covered. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD statistical publications such as the Quarterly National Accounts, the Annual National Accounts, the Labour Force Statistics and the Main Economic Indicators. The cut-off date for information used in the compilation of the projections was the 18 May 2016. Concerning the aggregation of world trade, a new composition has been introduced, since projections are now made for the major non-OECD economies. Thus, besides OECD and the OECD euro area, the following new regions are available: Dynamic Asian Economies (Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam); Oil Producers (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Brunei, Timor-Leste, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Algeria, Angola, Chad, Rep. of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Sudan); with the remaining countries in a residual 'Rest of the World' group.
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2016
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      This table contains data on economic short-time workers by professional status (employees or total employment). Economic short-time workers comprise workers who are working less than usual due to business slack, plant stoppage, or technical reasons. However, the definitions are not harmonised which hampers the comparison across countries. Data are broken down professional status - employees, total employment - by sex and by standardised age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55+, total).
    • December 2012
      Source: Liberia Institute of Statistics & Geo-Information Services
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 May, 2013
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    • January 2016
      Source: Ministry of Finance, Government of India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 March, 2016
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      Source: Department of Commerce based on DGCI&S data. The dataset provides the data on the direction of imports and exports by regions and Countries in rupee crores and U.S. dollar, million.
    • September 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2015
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      Countries report expenditures by public institutions, government-dependent private institutions, and independent private institutions. These expenditure figures are intended to represent the total cost of services provided by each type of institution, without regard to sources of funds (whether they are public or private). Expenditure is classified into current and capital expenditure. Current expenditure is then broken down, into expenditure on compensation of personnel, and expenditure on other (non-personnel) resources.
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Misha Gusev
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      Calculated using Mean Years of Schooling and Expected Years of Schooling.
    • December 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 December, 2016
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      Educational attainment is defined as the highest level successfully completed by the person, in the educational system of the country where the education was received. The levels of education are defined according to the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED):- Primary: ISCED level 1- Lower secondary: ISCED level 2- Upper and post secondary non-tertiary: ISCED levels 3-4- Tertiary: ISCED 1997 levels 5-6 or ISCED 2011 levels 5-8.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 June, 2016
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      The classification of personnel is based on functions and organises staff into four main functional categories: 1) Instructional Personnel; including two sub-groups: A. Classroom Teachers (ISCED 0-4) and Academic Staff (ISCED 5-6); and B. Teacher Aides (ISCED 0-4) and Teaching / Research Assistants (ISCED 5-6); 2) Professional Support for Students; including two sub-groups: A. Pedagogical Support (ISCED 0-4) and Academic Support (ISCED 5-6); B. Health and Social Support (ISCED 0-6); 3) Management/Quality Control/Administration; including four subgroups: A. School Level Management (ISCED 0-6); B. Higher Level Management (ISCED 0-6); C. School Level Administrative Personnel (ISCED 0-6); and D. Higher Level Administrative Personnel (ISCED 0-6); 4) Maintenance and Operations Personnel.
    • January 2016
      Source: Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies, Burundi
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 May, 2016
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      Publication: http://www.isteebu.bi/images/annuaires/annuaire%20statistique%20du%20burundi%202014.pdf
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      The present data collection consists of the following indicators:Interest rates : Day-to-day money market interest rates, 3-month interest rates, Euro yields and Long term government bond yields - Maastricht definitionEuro/Ecu exchange rates: Exchange rates against the ECU/euroEffective exchange rates indices : Nominal Effective Exchange Rate, Real Effective Exchange Rate Â
    • July 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 August, 2014
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      The Pensions at a Glance indicators, covering all 34 OECD countries, are designed to show future entitlements for workers who entered the labour market in 2008 and spend their entire working lives under the same set of rules. The results presented here include all mandatory pension schemes for private-sector workers, regardless of whether they are public or private.
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 July, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 July, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 August, 2015
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    • February 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 August, 2015
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    • February 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 August, 2015
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 September, 2016
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      This dataset provides selected information on emissions of traditional air pollutants: emission data are based upon the best available engineering estimates for a given period; they concern man-made emissions of sulphur oxides (SOx), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter, carbon monoxide (CO) and volatile organic compounds (VOC). The share of human activities as a source in total emissions of traditional air pollutants varies depending on the type of pollutant; most SOx emissions are man-made whereas CO and NOx emissions are mainly of natural origin.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2016
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      Employment, participation rates: population aged 15-64; Unemployment rate: active population aged 15-64.   Rates as defined by the International Labour Organization.
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2016
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      Employment by Country, Activity and Year (ISIC Rev. 3.1), 1990-2015
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2016
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      Employment by Country, Activity and Year (ISIC Rev. 4), 1990-2015
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2016
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      Employment by full-time and part-time status, sex, 2015
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2016
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      This table contains the tenure composition (as a percentage of all job tenures). Data are broken down by professional status - employees and total employment - sex, five-year and broad age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55-64, 15-64, total, etc.).Job tenure is measured by the length of time workers have been working with their current employers. This information is valuable for estimating the degree of fluidity in the labour market and in identifying the areas of economic activity where the turnover of labour is rapid or otherwise. Data are reported 32 OECD countries and are missing for Israel and New Zealand as they are collected in their labour force surveys.Unit of measure used - Data are expressed as percentages.
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 October, 2016
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      Job tenure is measured by the length of time workers have been in their current or main job or with their current employer. This information is valuable for estimating the degree of fluidity in the labour market and in identifying the areas of economic activity where the turnover of labour is rapid or otherwise. Data are so far reported for a number of European countries and will be expanded to cover a greater number of countries.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2016
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      This table contains data on permanent and temporary workers based on the type of work contract of their main job. Data are further broken down by professional status - employees, total employment - by sex and by standardised age groups (15-19, 15-24, 20-24, 25-54, 55-64, 65+, total). Unit of measure used - Data are expressed in thousands of persons.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 March, 2016
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      The Fisheries Committee (COFI) from the Trade and Agriculture Directorate (TAD) collects, on an annual basis from all its participating countries, data on landings, aquaculture production, fleet, employment in the fisheries sector, and government financial transfers. Data are collected from Fisheries Ministries, National Statistics Offices and other institution designated as an official data source. Concepts Classifications Data are collected by the OECD using the methodologies established by the Coordinating Working Party on Fishery Statistics (CWP) (www.fao.org/fishery/cwp/search/en). This inter-agency body, created in 1960 to develop common procedures and standards for the collation of fisheries statistics, provides technical advice on fishery statistical matters. Its handbook of Fishery Statistical Standards comprises definitions of the various concepts used in fishery statistics, with the exception of Government Financial Transfers which is unique to the OECD. All other statistics are based on the CWP definitions. The OECD, a partner with the CWP, additionally collects information on values for its landings and records the breakdown between the types of landings (i.e. landings in domestic ports, landings in foreign ports) data series which are not collected by the FAO. While a number of countries cover landings in a similar fashion, the same does not hold true for capacity (feet/meters, GRT/engine powers), or for employment for which both Full-time equivalents or numbers of people are used. The OECD therefore does not duplicate FAO statistics but requests complementary information to feed its analytical work.
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
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      Employment Rate by Age, Marital Status, Sex and Country, 2015
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2016
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      Employment rate by marital status and sex, 2015
    • December 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2016
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    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2016
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      Employment rate of persons aged 25-49 by number of children aged under 17 and sex, 2015
    • November 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2016
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    • May 2012
      Source: Statistics Canada
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2012
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      This Dataset contains 3 tables. 1. Public sector employment, wages and salaries, seasonally unadjusted and adjusted, monthly, Jan 1981 to Mar 2012 2. Federal government employment, wages and salaries in census metropolitan areas for the month of September, annual, 1990 to 2011 Description 183-0003 3. Department of National Defence, military personnel seasonally unadjusted and adjusted, and wages and salaries, monthly, Mar 1969 to Mar 2012 Description 183-0004 Note : 1. Data may not add to the total due to rounding. 2. Each year in May, minor revisions are applied to various data series based on more current information, to improve overall data quality. 3. Effective May 29, 2009 revisions were made to 2005 to 2008 federal, provincial and territorial employment and wages and salaries data. An adjustment to the provincial and territorial general government data for 2001 to 2008 was made to exclude struck-off employees and employees on unpaid leave to better conform to the Public Sector Employment Survey's definition of employment. Also, provincial government business enterprise data in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta from 1999 to 2008 have been revised. 4. Effective May 29, 2009, 2001 to 2008 data on education, health and social service institutions and local general government from the Survey of Employment Payroll and Hours (SEPH) were revised.
    • March 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
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      The Energy Architecture Performance Index (EAPI) uses a set of indicators to highlight the performance of various countries across each facet of their energy architecture, determining to what extent nations have been able to create affordable, sustainable and secure energy systems
    • April 2012
      Source: Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Government of India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 December, 2013
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      Source: Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas. Note: Annual changes and shares of total are calculated using million tonnes per annum figures.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • October 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 November, 2016
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      The net enrolment ratio is the number of students of the official school-age group (defined by each country) enrolled in secondary-level education per 100 persons of the same age group. The gross enrolment ratio is the number of students enrolled in secondary level education (regardless of their age) per 100 persons of the official school-age group corresponding to secondary-level education. The secondary level consists of lower and upper secondary levels of ISCED 1997.
    • June 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2015
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      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • January 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 October, 2016
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    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: ICT systems and their usage in enterprises,use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises,e-commerce,e-business processes and organisational aspects,use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government),ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills,barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes,ICT expenditure and investment,ICT security and trust,use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT),access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things),access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity).Breakdowns:by size class,by NACE categories,by region (until 2010)
    • August 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 September, 2014
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    • June 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • June 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 November, 2015
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      Data given in this domain are collected on a yearly basis by the National Statistical Institutes or Ministries and are based on the annual Eurostat Model Questionnaires on ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) usage and e-commerce in enterprises. Large part of the data collected are used in the context of the 2011 - 2015 benchmarking framework (endorsed by i2010 High Level Group in November 2009) for the Digital Agenda Scoreboard, Europe's strategy for a flourishing digital economy by 2020. This conceptual framework follows the i2010 Benchmarking Framework which itself followed-up the eEurope 2005 Action Plan. The aim of the European ICT usage surveys is to collect and disseminate harmonised and comparable information on the use of Information and Communication Technologies in enterprises and e-commerce at European level. Coverage: The characteristics to be provided are drawn from the following list of subjects: - ICT systems and their usage in enterprises, - use of the Internet and other electronic networks by enterprises, - e-commerce, - e-business processes and organisational aspects, - use of ICT by enterprises to exchange information and services with governments and public administrations (e-government), - ICT competence in the enterprise and the need for ICT skills, - barriers to the use of ICT, the Internet and other electronic networks, e-commerce and e-business processes, - ICT expenditure and investment, - ICT security and trust, - use of ICT and its impact on the environment (Green ICT), - access to and use of the Internet and other network technologies for connecting objects and devices (Internet of Things), - access to and use of technologies providing the ability to connect to the Internet or other networks from anywhere at any time (ubiquitous connectivity). Breakdowns: - by size class, - by NACE categories, - by region (until 2010)
    • October 2011
      Source: United Nations Statistics Division
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      UNSD Environmental Indicators disseminate global environment statistics on ten indicator themes compiled from a wide range of data sources. The themes and indicator tables were selected based on the current demands for international environmental statistics and the availability of internationally comparable data. Statistics on Water and Waste are based on official statistics supplied by national statistical offices and/or ministries of environment (or equivalent institutions) in response to the biennial UNSD/UNEP Questionnaire on Environment Statistics, complemented with comparable statistics from OECD and Eurostat, and water resources data from FAO Aquastat. Statistics on other themes were compiled by UNSD from other international sources. In a few cases, UNSD has made some calculations in order to derive the indicators. However, generally no adjustments have been made to the values received from the source. UNSD is not responsible for the quality, completeness/availability, and validity of the data. Environment statistics is still in an early stage of development in many countries, and data are often sparse. The indicators selected here are those of relatively good quality and geographic coverage. Information on data quality and comparability is given at the end of each table together with other important metadata.
    • January 2016
      Source: Environmental Performance Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 March, 2016
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    • January 2016
      Source: Environmental Performance Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 March, 2016
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      A “proximity-to-target methodology” is used to assess how close each country is to an identified policy target. Country scores are determined by how close or far countries are to targets. Scores are standardized (i.e., on a scale of 0 to 100) for comparability, weighting, and aggregation. The Environmental Performance Index (EPI) is constructed through the calculation and aggregation of 20 indicators reflecting national-level environmental data. These indicators are combined into nine issue categories, each of which fit under one of two overarching objectives. The two objectives that provide the overarching structure of the EPI are Environmental Health and Ecosystem Vitality. Environmental Health measures the protection of human health from environmental harm. Ecosystem Vitality measures ecosystem protection and resource management. These two objectives are further divided into nine issue categories that span high-priority environmental policy issues, including air quality, forests, fisheries, and climate and energy, among others. The issue categories are extensive but not comprehensive. Underlying the nine issue categories are 20 indicators calculated from country-level data and statistics. After more than 15 years of work on environmental performance measurement and six iterations of the EPI, global data are still lacking on a number of key environmental issues. These include: freshwater quality, toxic chemical exposures, municipal solid waste management, nuclear safety, wetlands loss, agricultural soil quality and degradation, recycling rates, adaptation, vulnerability, and resiliency to climate change, desertification.
    • September 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2015
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      Agriculture can have significant impacts on the environment as it uses on average over 40% of water and land resources in OECD countries. The impacts occur on and off farm, including both pollution and degradation of soil, water and air, as well as the provision of ecological goods and services, such as biodiversity and providing a sink for greenhouse gases. Most OECD countries are tracking the environmental performance of agriculture, which is informing policy makers and society on the state and trends in agri-environmental conditions, and can provide a valuable aid to policy analysis (Chapter 4). As countries are increasingly using a wide range of policy measures to address agri-environmental issues, indicators provide crucial information to monitor and analyse the effects of those policies on the environment. They are also enriching the understanding and analysis of the environmental effects of possible future policy scenarios and agricultural projections. This report provides the latest and most comprehensive data across OECD countries on the environmental performance of agriculture since 1990. A set of agri-environmental indicators (Annex 1, Section II) has been developed through several specific theme-focused workshops involving OECD country analysts and scientific experts, complemented with thorough reviews of the literature. The OECD’s Driving Force-State-Response model (DSR) is the organising framework for developing the indicators.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 June, 2016
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      Unit of measure used Environmental protection (EP) includes all purposeful activities directly aimed at the prevention, reduction and elimination of pollution or any other degradation of the environment resulting from production or consumption processes. The scope of Environmental Protection is defined according to the Classification of Environmental Protection Activities (CEPA), which distinguishes nine different environmental domains. Activities such as energy and material saving are only included to the extent that they mainly aim at environmental protection. An important example is recycling which is included only to the extent that it constitutes a substitute for waste management. Excluded are: (i) activities that, while beneficial to the environment, primarily satisfy technical needs or health and safety requirements for the protection of the workplace. (ii) expenditure linked to mobilisation of natural resources (e.g., water supply). (iii) calculated cost items such as depreciation (consumption of fixed capital) or the cost of capital as this questionnaire only records actual outlays. (iv) payments of interest, fines and penalties for non-compliance with environmental regulations or compensations to third parties etc., as they are not directly linked with an environmental protection activity. Environmental Protection Expenditure can be evaluated both according to the abater principle and the financing principle. This distinction makes it possible to aggregate different sectors and industries without double counting. Expenditure according to the abater principle (EXP I), includes all expenditure that the sector has for measures they themselves execute. Any economic benefits directly linked with the environmental protection activities (Receipts from by-products) are deducted in order to calculate the net amount of money spent by the sector for their own activities. The financing principle (EXP II) measures how much money a particular sector (directly) contributes to overall environmental protection activities, wherever they are executed. This means that the part of EXP I that was directly financed by others (through subsidies or revenues received) should be deducted, while the part of EXP I in other sectors that this sector finances directly (through subsidies or fees paid) should be added. The framework is based on double entry bookkeeping, where each activity and expenditure item has an abater (producer) and a financing side. This means that much expenditure by specialised producers is financed by the users of their services, mainly business sector and households. This will be recorded as Revenues for the Specialised producers (Table 4), and fees/purchases in Business and Households (Tables 2 and 3). Specialised producers include the production of environmental protection services by public and private corporations or quasi-corporations for the use of other units, mainly financed by the users of these services. These are mainly activities within ISIC Rev. 4/NACE Rev. 2 division and classes 37, 38.1, 38.2 and 39 such as: 37 Sewerage, 38.1 Waste collection, 38.2 Waste treatment and disposal, 39  Remediation activities and other waste management services. This sector is the sum of two components: a) Public specialised producers: All corporations and quasi-corporations that are subject to control by government units. Control is defined as the ability to determine general corporate policy by choosing appropriate directors, if necessary (Table 4A). b) Private specialised producers: All corporations and quasi-corporations that are not subject to control by government units (Table 4B). Specialised producers could also include for example the activities of e.g. volunteer environmental organisations or secondary environmental activities. These should be entered along with a footnote describing the coverage. CEPA domains: a column "pollution abatement and control" (PAC) has been kept in the questionnaire to ensure continuity with earlier data series.
    • August 2011
      Source: Multiple Sources
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      A compilation of monthly closing stock indices for major stock exchanges across the World. This dataset is updated on a monthly basis.
    • September 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2016
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    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 December, 2016
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      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trademark and Designs constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trademark and Designs reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trademark and Design data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of trademarks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. A design is the outward appearance of a product or part of it, resulting from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. The design or shape of a product can be synonymous with the branding and image of a company and can become an asset with increasing monetary value. This domain provides users with data concerning Community Trademarks and Designs. Community Trademarks and Design refer to trade mark and design protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market (OHIM) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of Community Trademarks and Designs. A Community trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with OHIM in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the CTM Regulations (Source: OHIM). A registered Community design (RCD) is an exclusive right that covers the outward appearance of a product or part of it. The fact that the right is registered confers on the design great certainty should infringement occur. An RCD initially has a life of five years from the filing date and can be renewed in blocks of five years up to a maximum of 25 years. Applicants may market a design for up to 12 months before filing for an RCD without destroying its novelty (Source: OHIM).
    • January 2010
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      This dataset provides an overview of the most recent and pertinent annual energy related statistics in Europe. The data is drawn from several sources: the European Commission’s services; international organisations, such as the European Environment Agency and the International Energy Agency and, where no data is currently available, from the European Commission’s estimations. The indicator calculations follow the methodology established by the European Commission - DG Energy.
    • May 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
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      The Scoreboard has been prepared from companies' annual reports and accounts received by an independent data provider.
    • September 2015
      Source: Multiple Sources
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 September, 2015
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    • February 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 August, 2016
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      Monthly prices for about 600 fish products and an overview of the major trends on the European market, reported by an extensive correspondent network. Abstract: May is the generally the time of the year when traders are restocking for the summer sales. This year, the relatively higher value of the euro has made European importers competitive again on the world market, and sales are quite strong at the moment. With 30 Members having formally deposited their instruments of adherence, the Port State Measures Agreement (PSMA), an international accord intended to combat Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing, is set to become international law on 5 June 2016,. The PSMA, whose development through international dialogue and expert consultation has been driven and coordinated by FAO, focuses on preventing IUU fishing by requiring that parties designate specific ports for use by foreign vessels and introducing controls and procedures to make it more difficult for IUU fish to enter national or international markets. 
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 December, 2016
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      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 December, 2016
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      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
    • November 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Intellectual property refers broadly to the creations of the human mind. Intellectual property rights protect the interests of creators by giving them property rights over their creations. Trade marks constitute means by which creators seek protection for their industrial property. Trade marks reflect the non-technological innovation in every sector of economic life, including services. In this context, indicators based on Trade mark data can provide a link between innovation and the market. Trade marks such as words or figurative marks are an essential part of the “identity” of goods and services. They help deliver brand recognition, in logos for example, and play an important role in marketing and communication. It is possible to register a variety of Trade marks including words, other graphical representations, and even sounds. Rights owners have a choice of obtaining protection on a country-by-country basis, or using international systems. This domain provides users with data concerning European Union Trade marks. European Union Trade marks refer to trade mark protections throughout the European Union, which covers 28 countries. The European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) is the official office of the European Union for the registration of European Union Trade marks and Designs. A European Union Trade mark is an exclusive right that protects distinctive signs, valid across the EU, registered directly with EUIPO in Alicante in accordance with the conditions specified in the EUTM Regulations (Source: EUIPO).
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 December, 2016
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    • January 2017
      Source: XE
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 January, 2017
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      This dataset contains the exchange rate of 1USD to their country local currency.
    • October 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 October, 2015
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      Recent exchange rate movements have been unusually large, triggering a debate regarding their likely effects on trade. Historical experience in advanced and emerging market and developing economies suggests that exchange rate movements typically have sizable effects on export and import volumes. A 10 percent real effective depreciation in an economy’s currency is associated with a rise in real net exports of, on average, 1.5 percent of GDP, with substantial cross-country variation around this average. Although these effects fully materialize over a number of years, much of the adjustment occurs in the first year. The boost to exports associated with currency depreciation is found to be largest in countries with initial economic slack and with domestic financial systems that are operating normally. Some evidence suggests that the rise of global value chains has weakened the relationship between exchange rates and trade in intermediate products used as inputs into other economies’ exports. However, the bulk of global trade still consists of conventional trade, and there is little evidence of a general trend toward disconnect between exchange rates and total exports and imports.
    • March 2015
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 April, 2016
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      This table shows exchange rates for currencies used in over 190 world economies presented in a crossrates layout where countries are presented in both rows and columns. National currency per US dollars exchange rates are used to derive explicit exchange rates for each of the countries presented with regard to any other country. Country series are consistent over time: for example, a conversion was made from national currency to Euro for the Euro Zone economies for all years prior to the adoption of Euro.
    • October 2016
      Source: InterNations
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2016
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    • September 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2014
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      Countries report expenditures by sources of funds: Governement (central, regional, local); International agencies and other foreign sources; Households and Other private entities (including firms and religious institutions and other non-profit organisations). Three types of financial transactions can be distinguished: -direct expenditure/payments on educational institutions -Intergovernmental transfers for education -Transfers to students or households and to other private entities.
    • December 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 July, 2014
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:educ_bo_fi_ftot The Bologna declaration was signed in 1999 by 29 European ministers responsible for higher education. Today, 46 signatory countries are engaged in the process towards a European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The Bologna Process is an intergovernmental initiative which also involves the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO-CEPES, as well as representatives of higher education institutions, students, staff, employers and quality assurance agencies. It aims to create a European Higher Education Area by 2010, and to promote the European system of higher education worldwide. More information on the Bologna process is available on http://ec.europa.eu/education/higher-education/doc1290_en.htm. Many indicators on social dimension and mobility in the Bologna process come from the UOE data collection in the education statistics domain. The aim of the education statistics domain is to provide comparable statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data cover participation and completion of education programmes, personnel in education and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The main source of data is the joint UIS (UNESCO Institute of Statistics)/OECD/Eurostat (UOE) questionnaires on education statistics, which constitute the core database on education. Data on regional enrolments and foreign language learning are collected additionally by Eurostat. Countries provide data, coming from administrative records, on the basis of commonly agreed definitions. From the UOE data collection, the following datasets on the Bologna Process are available: A. Widening accesseduc_bo_ac_ent2: Net entry rate (ISCED 5A) by age and sexeduc_bo_ac_ent3: Female entrants by field of education (ISCED 5A)educ_bo_ac_gent: Entrants at ISCED 5A and qualifying graduates of secondary schooling (ISCED 3A - 4A)educ_bo_ac_el1t: Students (ISCED 5A) studying part-time, by age   B. Study frameworkeduc_bo_fi_fgdp: Public expenditure on tertiary education (ISCED 5-6), as % of GDP or total public expenditureeduc_bo_fi_ftot: Annual total expenditure on educational institutions (ISCED 5-6) per full-time equivalent student with and without expenditure on research and ancillary serviceseduc_bo_fi_ffun: Tertiary education institutions' income from private sources (households and other private entities) as % of all public and private sourceseduc_bo_fi_fiaid: Public financial aid to tertiary students (ISCED 5-6), by type of aid, as % of public expenditure on tertiary education   C. Student and staff mobilityeduc_bo_mo_el8o: Students (ISCED 5A and 6) who are nationals of a given country, studying in another country (EU-27, EFTA and CC) as % of the total enrolment in that countryeduc_bo_mo_el8i: Number of foreign students (world and Bologna Area) studying in a given country, as % of the total enrolment in that country, ISCED 5A and 6educ_bo_mo_gr4: Graduates (ISCED 5A and 6) from abroad (non-citizens, permanent residence and prior education outside the country)   D. Effective outcomes and employabilityeduc_bo_ou_gren: Gross graduation rate and net entry rate, ISCED 5A     The data for some countries which do not participate in the UOE data collection were provided to Eurostat specifically for the monitoring of the Bologna Process. Not being fully integrated in the UOE, the data sometimes might not be as comparable as the data for the remaining countries, due to differences in the underlying data sources and definitions. These data were provided by the following entities:Andorra (AD): data provided by the University of Andorra (indicators educ_bo_ac_ent3, educ_bo_fi_ffun, educ_bo_mo_el8i, educ_bo_mo_gr4)Armenia (AM): data provided by the Ministry of Education and Science (educ_bo_ac_gent, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_mo_gr4, educ_bo_ou_gren)Georgia (GE): data provided by the NSI, Statistics Georgia (educ_bo_ac_ent3, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_fi_fgdp, educ_bo_mo_gr4)Serbia (RS): data provided by the NSI, Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia (educ_bo_mo_el8i)Ukraine (UA): data provided by the NSI, State Statistics Committee for Ukraine (educ_bo_ou_gren, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_mo_el8i, educ_bo_mo_gr4, educ_bo_ou_gren)
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 May, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha3p Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha3m Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.3.2. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.3.3. Coverage - sectorPublic Health
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha3h Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.3.2. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.3.3. Coverage - sectorPublic Health
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha2p Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha2m Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha2h Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha1p Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 May, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha1m Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.3.2. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.3.3. Coverage - sectorPublic Health
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha1h Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.3.2. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.3.3. Coverage - sectorPublic Health
    • July 2012
      Source: Knoema
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Source : United States Department of Agriculture; International Monetary Fund; UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs; Food and Agriculture Organization, The World Bank
    • August 2016
      Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 September, 2016
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      Percent of household final consumption expenditures spent on food, alcoholic beverages, and tobacco that were consumed at home, 2009-2012. The data are computed by Birgit Meade (202-694-5159), ERS/USDA, EUROMONITOR data, June 2015.
    • September 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 October, 2016
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      This table presents trade in services by service category for individual countries, expressed in millions of dollars and as percentages of a country's total trade in services. The commercial services, which exclude government services and follow the GATS definition, are included as well.
    • July 2014
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 July, 2014
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      This table is a compilation of statistics of trade in goods and services as reported in the Balance of Payments. The conceptual framework used for the compilation is based on the IMF Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5, 1993).
    • February 2016
      Source: Coffee Board of India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2016
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    • April 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 April, 2016
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      International trade in goods statistics are an important data source for many public and private sector decision-makers at international, European Union and national level. For example, at the European Union level, international trade data are extensively used for multilateral and bilateral negotiations within the framework of the common commercial policy, to define and implement anti-dumping policy, to evaluate the progress of the Single Market and many other policies. Moreover, they constitute an essential source for the compilation of balance of payments statistics and national accounts. International trade in goods statistics cover both extra- and intra-EU trade: Extra-EU trade statistics cover the trading of goods between Member States and a non-member countries. Intra-EU trade statistics cover the trading of goods between Member States. "Goods" means all movable property including electricity. Detailed and aggregated data are published for the Euro area, the European Union and for each Member State separately. Main components: Data record the monthly trade between Member States in terms of arrivals and dispatches of goods as well as the monthly trade in terms of imports and exports between Member States and non-member countries. However, in publications only the term “exports” for all outward flows and “imports” for all inward flows are applied for both intra-EU trade and extra-EU trade. Extra-EU trade imports and exports are recorded in the Member State where the goods are placed under the customs procedures. Extra-EU trade statistics do not record goods in transit, goods placed into customs warehouses or goods for temporary admission. Data sources: The statistical information is mainly provided by the traders on the basis of Customs (extra-EU) and Intrastat (intra-EU) declarations. Data are collected by the competent national authorities of the Member States and compiled according to a harmonised methodology established by EU regulations before transmission to Eurostat. Classification systems: - Product classification: For detailed data, products are disseminated according to the Combined Nomenclature (CN8), which first six digit codes coincide with the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (HS), products are disseminated as well according to the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC) and the Broad Economic Categories (BEC). - Country classification: The Geonomenclature is used for classifying reporting countries and trading partners. Nomenclatures and correspondence tables are available at the Eurostat’s classification server RAMON. The following basic information is provided by Eurostat: - reporting country, - reference period, - trade flow, - product, - trading partner - mode of transport. Detailed data are disseminated according to the Combined Nomenclature (HS2, HS4, HS6 and CN8 levels) for the following indicators: - trade value (in Euro), - trade quantity in 100 kg, - trade quantity in supplementary units (published for some goods according to the Combined Nomenclature). Aggregated data cover both short and long term indicators. Short term indicators are disseminated according to major SITC and BEC groups for the following indicators: - gross and seasonally adjusted trade value (in million Euro), - unit-value indices, - gross and seasonally adjusted volume indices, - growth rates of trade values and indices. Long term indicators are disseminated according to major SITC groups for the following indicators: - trade value (in billion Euro), - shares of Member States in EU and world trade, - shares of main trading partners in EU trade, - volume indices. Adjustments are applied by the Member States to compensate the impact of exemption thresholds, which release the information providers from statistical formalities, as well as, to take into account the late or not response of the providers. In addition, Eurostat applies seasonal adjustments to aggregated time series.
  • F
    • June 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 June, 2014
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      OECD Factbook provides a global overview of today’s major economic, social and environmental indicators which cover a wide range of areas: agriculture, economic production, education, energy, environment, foreign aid, health, industry, information and communications, international trade, labour force, population, taxation, public expenditure and R&D. More countries than ever are covered in greater detail, enabling direct comparisons for many indicators between OECD Members and Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russian Federation and South Africa.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
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      Accessed On: 24 June, 2016
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      OECD Factbook provides a global overview of today's major economic, social and environmental indicators which cover a wide range of areas: agriculture, economic production, education, energy, environment, foreign aid, health, industry, information and communications, international trade, labor force, population, taxation, public expenditure and R&D. More countries than ever are covered in greater detail, enabling direct comparisons for many indicators between OECD Members and Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russian Federation and South Africa.
    • July 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
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      Accessed On: 01 July, 2015
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      The FAO indices of agricultural production show the relative level of the aggregate volume of agricultural production for each year in comparison with the base period 2004-2006. They are based on the sum of price-weighted quantities of different agricultural commodities produced after deductions of quantities used as seed and feed weighted in a similar manner. The resulting aggregate represents, therefore, disposable production for any use except as seed and feed. All the indices at the country, regional and world levels are calculated by the Laspeyres formula. Production quantities of each commodity are weighted by 2004-2006 average international commodity prices and summed for each year. To obtain the index, the aggregate for a given year is divided by the average aggregate for the base period 2004-2006. Since the FAO indices are based on the concept of agriculture as a single enterprise, amounts of seed and feed are subtracted from the production data to avoid double counting them, once in the production data and once with the crops or livestock produced from them. Deductions for seed (in the case of eggs, for hatching) and for livestock and poultry feed apply to both domestically produced and imported commodities. They cover only primary agricultural products destined to animal feed (e.g. maize, potatoes, milk, etc.). Processed and semi-processed feed items such as bran, oilcakes, meals and molasses have been completely excluded from the calculations at all stages. It should be noted that when calculating indices of agricultural, food and nonfood production, all intermediate primary inputs of agricultural origin are deducted. However, for indices of any other commodity group, only inputs originating from within the same group are deducted; thus, only seed is removed from the group “crops” and from all crop subgroups, such as cereals, oil crops, etc.; and both feed and seed originating from within the livestock sector (e.g. milk feed, hatching eggs) are removed from the group “livestock products”. For the main two livestock subgroups, namely, meat and milk, only feed originating from the respective subgroup is removed. The”international commodity prices” are used in order to avoid the use of exchange rates for obtaining continental and world aggregates, and also to improve and facilitate international comparative analysis of productivity at the national level. These” international prices”, expressed in so-called”international dollars”, are derived using a Geary-Khamis formula for the agricultural sector. This method assigns a single “price” to each commodity. For example, one metric ton of wheat has the same price regardless of the country where it was produced. The currency unit in which the prices are expressed has no influence on the indices published. The commodities covered in the computation of indices of agricultural production are all crops and livestock products originating in each country. Practically all products are covered, with the main exception of fodder crops. The category of food production includes commodities that are considered edible and that contain nutrients. Accordingly, coffee and tea are excluded along with inedible commodities because, although edible, they have practically no nutritive value. Indices for meat production are computed based on data for production from indigenous animals, which takes account of the meat equivalent of exported live animals but excludes the meat equivalent of imported live animals. For index purposes, annual changes in livestock and poultry numbers or in their average live weight are not taken into account. The indices are calculated from production data presented on a calendar year basis. The FAO indices may differ from those produced by the countries themselves because of differences in concepts of production, coverage, weights, time reference of data and methods of calculation
    • July 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
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      Accessed On: 03 August, 2016
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      AQUASTAT is FAO's global information system on water and agriculture, developed by the Land and Water Division. The main mandate of the programme is to collect, analyze and disseminate information on water resources, water uses, and agricultural water management with an emphasis on countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. This allows interested users to find comprehensive and regularly updated information at global, regional, and national levels.
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2015
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      Consumer price indices (CPIs) measure changes over time in the general level of prices of consumer goods and services that households acquire, use or pay for consumption. This is done by measuring the cost of purchasing a fixed basket of consumer goods and services of constant quality and similar characteristics, with the products in the basket being selected to be representative of households’ expenditure during a year or other specified period.
    • June 2012
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 July, 2012
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      This dataset represents Food Consumption, Food Production and Trade by various Food items. Note: data represent values for time periods (1990-1992, 1995-97, 2000-02, 2005-07) and is shown as data for the last year of time period (1992, 1997, 2002, 2007).
    • August 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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      The Price domain of FAOSTAT contains annual data on prices received by farmers (called Producer prices) for primary crops, live animals, livestock primary products as collected at the point of initial sale (prices paid at the farm-gate). Data are provided for over 130 countries and for some 200 commodities, representing over 97 percent of the world’s value of gross agricultural production (at 1999-2001 International Dollar Prices). PriceSTAT contains data from 1991 onwards. The Price domain provides price data in three units: i) Local Currency Units (LCU) ii) Standard Local Currency (SLC) iii) US Dollars.
    • October 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2017
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      Producer Price Indices - AnnualIndices of agricultural producer prices measure the average annual change over time in the selling prices received by farmers (prices at the farm-gate or at the first point of sale). Annual data are provided for over 80 countries. The three categories of producer price indices available in FAOSTAT comprise: Single-item price indices, Commodity group indices and the Agriculture producer price index.
    • November 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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      Farmers produce food and fiber using a wide variety of farm practices and management systems that differ by commodity, region, and farm and operator characteristics. The mix of inputs, practices, and technologies used by farmers, when combined with land, labor, and water resources, affects production costs; farm income; and soil, water and air quality.
    • February 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 February, 2016
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      Value of gross production has been compiled by multiplying gross production in physical terms by output prices at farm gate. Thus, value of production measures production in monetary terms at the farm gate level. Since intermediate uses within the agricultural sector (seed and feed) have not been subtracted from production data, this value of production aggregate refers to the notion of "gross production". Value of gross production is provided in both current and constant terms and is expressed in US dollars and Standard Local Currency (SLC). The current value of production measures value in the prices relating to the period being measured. Thus, it represents the market value of food and agricultural products at the time they were produced. Knowing this figure is helpful in understanding exactly what was happening within a given economy at that point in time. Often, this information can help explain economic trends that emerged in later periods and why they took place. Value of production in constant terms is derived using the average prices of a selected year or years, known as the base period. Constant price series can be used to show how the quantity or volume of products has changed, and are often referred to as volume measures. The ratio of the current and constant price series gives a measure of price movements. US dollar figures for value of gross production are converted from local currencies using official exchange rates as prevailing in the respective years. The SLC of a country is the local currency prevailing in the latest year. Expressing data series in one uniform currency is useful because it avoids the influence of revaluation in local currency, if any, on value of production
    • October 2011
      Source: Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 December, 2012
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      FAPRI U.S. and World Outlook presents multi-year projections for the United States and world agricultural sectors. These projections serve as a baseline for evaluating and comparing alternative macroeconomic, policy, weather, and technological scenarios. These reports have been produced annually and used by congressional and agricultural leaders since 1985.
    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 May, 2016
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    • June 2010
      Source: International Federation of Association Football
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 June, 2014
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      FIFA is the international governing body of association football, futsal and beach soccer. Its membership comprises 209 national associations. Its headquarters are in Zurich, Switzerland, and its president is Sepp Blatter. FIFA is responsible for the organisation of football's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup.
    • August 2013
      Source: International Fertilizer Industry Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 October, 2013
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      Assessment of Fertilizer Use by Crop at the Global Level 2011. Fully understanding the contribution of the different crop types to fertilizer use at national, regional and global levels is a prerequisite to the development of sound fertilizer demand forecasts. IFA gathers information on fertilizer use by crop in the main fertilizer-consuming countries. IFA's Assessment currently covers 23 countries (considering the EU-27 as a single country), which account together for more than 90% of world fertilizer consumption, making it possible to analyze fertilizer use by crop type at the global level.
    • December 2016
      Source: International Federation of Association Football
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 December, 2016
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      Monthly updates of FIFA World Football Men's Ranking 
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2016
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      It presents the final consumption expenditure of households broken down by the COICOP (Classification of Individual Consumption According to Purpose) classification and by durability.  It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to annual national accounts questionnaire. This questionnaire is designed to collect internationally comparable data according to the 1993 SNA. In national currency, in current prices and constant prices (national base year, previous year prices and OECD base year i.e. 2010). Expressed in millions. For the Euro area countries, the data in national currency for all years are calculated using the fixed conversion rates against the euro.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2016
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      National Accounts - Volume IIIa - Financial Accounts - Flows, which record, by type of financial instruments, the financial transactions between institutional sectors, and are presented in two tables: Financial accounts, consolidated and Financial accounts, non-consolidated.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 July, 2016
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      National Accounts - Volume IIIa - Financial Accounts - Flows, which record, by type of financial instruments, the financial transactions between institutional sectors, and are presented in two tables: Financial accounts, consolidated and Financial accounts, non-consolidated.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2016
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      National Accounts - Volume IIIb - Financial Balance Sheets - Stocks, which record the stocks of financial assets and liabilities by institutional sectors, at the end of the accounting period, and are presented in two tables: Balance sheets for financial assets and liabilities, consolidated and Balance sheets for financial assets and liabilities, non consolidated.Statistics are reported at current prices in millions of national currency and in millions of Euros for OECD countries which are members of the Euro zone: Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Slovenia and Spain.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 October, 2016
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      The financial indicators in this dataset are derived from OECD countries’ financial accounts (transactions): they give a picture of the short-term behaviour of institutional sectors. They comprise for instance: Net financial transactions of the general government, as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), which corresponds to the general government deficit; Transactions in financial assets of Households and NPISHs, as a percentage of Households Gross Disposable Income (GDI); Transactions in liabilities of Households and NPISHs, as a percentage of GDI.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2016
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      The financial indicators in this dataset are constructed from OECD countries’ financial balance sheets (stocks): these ratios are considered as relevant to analyse the position and performance of the various institutional sectors. They comprise for instance: Financial net worth of Households and NPISHs, as a percentage of GDI; Non-financial corporations debt to equity ratio; Private sector debt; Leverage of the banking sector; General government debt, as a percentage of GDP.
    • January 2017
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 January, 2017
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      The Financial Soundness Indicators (FSIs), developed by the IMF together with the international community, are aimed at supporting macroprudential analysis—the surveillance and assessment of the strengths and vulnerabilities of financial systems:FSIs include indicators of the health of entire sectors of financial institutions, but also of the counterpart corporate and household sectors, and of relevant markets.FSIs, conceived as a new area of statistics—macroprudential statistics—aims to fill the gap between macroeconomic statistics and micro-prudential data.
    • January 2017
      Source: Statistics Finland
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      Accessed On: 20 January, 2017
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      Accommodation statistics describe the supply and use of hotel services, and provide data on the numbers of users of these services and on overnight stays. Arrivals, Nights spend, Change of nights spend, %, (3). Note: 2016 Annual data is sum of January to May and for rest of the years from January to December
    • January 2017
      Source: Statistics Finland
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      Accessed On: 20 January, 2017
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      The statistics on balance of payments describes the external balance of the national economy from the perspectives of both real and financial economy.
    • February 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2016
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      Employment statistics are annual statistics providing data by region on the population’s economic activity and employment.
    • July 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 January, 2017
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      The statistics present information about total consumption of energy, electricity production and total consumption and imports and exports of energy.
    • October 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2016
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      Direct investments to Finland describe the capital that a foreign investor has invested directly in a unit located in Finland under the investors' control or influence.
    • July 2016
      Source: National Institute for Health and Welfare
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      Accessed On: 18 July, 2016
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      In 2008, National Institute for Health and Welfare brought into use a new national system of accounting health expenditure and financing that is based on the OECD System of Health Accounts (SHA). The SHA system gathers data by function, provider and source of finance.
    • May 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 July, 2016
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      Statistics on international trade in services describe Finnish enterprises’ international sales and imports of services by service type and target country.
    • December 2015
      Source: Cruise Market Watch
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 July, 2016
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      Statistics on origin of cruise passengers.
    • April 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 July, 2016
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      These statistics on the structure of the population describe Finnish and foreign citizens permanently resident in Finland at the turn of the year.
    • October 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 November, 2016
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      Data on first marriages are numbers of men and women who were married for the first time during the year, by age at last birthday.
    • December 2015
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2016
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      First Year Expenditures and Planned Total Expenditures for Investments Initiated in 2015, Country of UBO by Type of Investment
    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 June, 2016
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      Fisheries fleet: The FAO has a two dimensional definition, of which the OECD only uses the concept of fishing vessel. Fishery Fleet: The term "fishery fleet" or "fishery vessels" refers to mobile floating objects of any kind and size, operating in freshwater, brackishwater and marine waters which are used for catching, harvesting, searching, transporting, landing, preserving and/or processing fish, shellfish and other aquatic organisms, residues and plants.Fishing vessel: The term "fishing vessel" is used instead when the vessel is engaged only in catching operations. Gross Register Tonnage: The Gross Register Tonnage represents the total measured cubic content of the permanently enclosed spaces of a vessel, with some allowances or deductions for exempt spaces such as living quarters (1 gross register ton = 100 cubic feet = 2.83 cubic metres).
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 July, 2016
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      It presents the whole set of non financial accounts, from the production account to the acquisitions of non-financial assets accounts. For general government sector, property income, other current transfers and capital transfers are consolidated.. It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to the new version of the annual national accounts questionnaire. This questionnaire is designed to collect internationally comparable data according to the 1993 SNA.
    • January 2016
      Source: Investment & Pensions Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 February, 2016
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      Fixed income - Investment grade corporate bonds tables 2015
    • January 2016
      Source: Investment & Pensions Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 February, 2016
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      Fixed income - Public debt tables 2015
    • August 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 August, 2015
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      A food balance sheet presents a comprehensive picture of the pattern of a country's food supply during a specified reference period. The food balance sheet shows for each food item i.e. each primary commodity availability for human consumption which corresponds to the sources of supply and its utilisation. The total quantity of foodstuffs produced in a country added to the total quantity imported and adjusted to any change in stocks that may have occurred since the beginning of the reference period gives the supply available during that period. On the utilisation side a distinction is made between the quantities exported, fed to livestock + used for seed, losses during storage and transportation, and food supplies available for human consumption. The per capita supply of each such food item available for human consumption is then obtained by dividing the respective quantity by the related data on the population actually partaking in it. Data on per capita food supplies are expressed in terms of quantity and by applying appropriate food composition factors for all primary and processed products also in terms of dietary energy value, protein and fat content. The Food Balances domain covers: Production Trade Feed and Seed Waste Other utilisation Consumption Elements covered: Quantities Calories, Proteins, Fats
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 August, 2015
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    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 May, 2015
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      Food supply data is some of the most important data in FAOSTAT. In fact, this data is for the basis for estimation of global and national undernourishment assessment, when it is combined with parameters and other data sets. This data has been the foundation of food balance sheets ever since they were first constructed. The data is accessed by both business and governments for economic analysis and policy setting, as well as being used by the academic community. The agricultural supply domain covers food commodities that have been converted back into primary equivalents: Quantity Dietary Energy Proteins Fats Totals and per Capita
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 May, 2015
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      Food supply data is some of the most important data in FAOSTAT. In fact, this data is for the basis for estimation of global and national undernourishment assessment, when it is combined with parameters and other data sets.This data has been the foundation of food balance sheets ever since they were first constructed. The data is accessed by both business and governments for economic analysis and policy setting, as well as being used by the academic community. The agricultural supply domain covers food commodities that have been converted back into primary equivalents: Quantity Dietary Energy, Proteins, Fats, Totals and per Capita
    • June 2016
      Source: Forbes
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 September, 2016
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      Most innovation rankings are popularity contests based on past performance or editorial whims. We set out to create something very different with the World’s Most Innovative Companies list, using the wisdom of the crowd. Our method relies on investors’ ability to identify firms they expect to be innovative now and in the future.
    • September 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2014
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      The number of students enrolled refers to the count of students studying in the reference period. Each student enrolled in the education programmes covered by the corresponding category is counted once and only once. National data collection systems permitting, the statistics reflect the number of students enrolled at the beginning of the school / academic year. Preferably, the end (or near-end) of the first month of the school / academic year is chosen (special arrangements are made for part-year students who may not start studies at the beginning of the school year). Students are classified as foreign students (non-citizens) if they are not citizens of the country in which the data are collected. While pragmatic and operational, this classification is inappropriate for capturing student mobility because of differing national policies regarding the naturalisation of immigrants. Countries that have lower propensity to grant permanent residence to its immigrant populations are likely to report second generation immigrants as foreign students. Therefore, for student mobility and bilateral comparisons, interpretations of data based on the concept of foreign students should be made with caution. Students are classified as international students if they left their country of origin and moved to another country for the purpose of study. Depending on country-specific immigration legislation, mobility arrangements, and data availability, international students may be defined as students who are not permanent or usual residents of their country of study or alternatively as students who obtained their prior education in a different country, including another EU country.
    • October 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 December, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 December, 2016
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      The activities of multinational enterprises statistics available here provide a picture of the overall activities of U.S. affiliates of foreign parents and contain a wide variety of indicators of their financial structure and operations. These statistics cover items that are needed in analyzing the characteristics, performance, and economic impact of MNEs, and are obtained from mandatory surveys of U.S. affiliates of foreign parents conducted by BEA.
    • January 2016
      Source: Statistics Centre of Abu Dhabi
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 May, 2016
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    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries. This domain provides users with data concerning patent applications to the European Patent Office - EPO, patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office - USPTO and triadic patent families. EPO data refer to all patent applications by priority year as opposed to patents granted by priority year, which is the case of USPTO data.Patents reflect a country's inventive activity. Patents also show the country's capacity to exploit knowledge and translate it into potential economic gains. In this context, indicators based on patent statistics are widely used to assess the inventive performance of countries.
    • December 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 May, 2014
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:educ_bo_mo_el8i The Bologna declaration was signed in 1999 by 29 European ministers responsible for higher education. Today, 46 signatory countries are engaged in the process towards a European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The Bologna Process is an intergovernmental initiative which also involves the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO-CEPES, as well as representatives of higher education institutions, students, staff, employers and quality assurance agencies. It aims to create a European Higher Education Area by 2010, and to promote the European system of higher education worldwide. More information on the Bologna process is available on http://ec.europa.eu/education/higher-education/doc1290_en.htm. Many indicators on social dimension and mobility in the Bologna process come from the UOE data collection in the education statistics domain. The aim of the education statistics domain is to provide comparable statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data cover participation and completion of education programmes, personnel in education and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The main source of data is the joint UIS (UNESCO Institute of Statistics)/OECD/Eurostat (UOE) questionnaires on education statistics, which constitute the core database on education. Data on regional enrolments and foreign language learning are collected additionally by Eurostat. Countries provide data, coming from administrative records, on the basis of commonly agreed definitions. From the UOE data collection, the following datasets on the Bologna Process are available: A. Widening access educ_bo_ac_ent2: Net entry rate (ISCED 5A) by age and sexeduc_bo_ac_ent3: Female entrants by field of education (ISCED 5A)educ_bo_ac_gent: Entrants at ISCED 5A and qualifying graduates of secondary schooling (ISCED 3A - 4A)educ_bo_ac_el1t: Students (ISCED 5A) studying part-time, by age B. Study framework educ_bo_fi_fgdp: Public expenditure on tertiary education (ISCED 5-6), as % of GDP or total public expenditureeduc_bo_fi_ftot: Annual total expenditure on educational institutions (ISCED 5-6) per full-time equivalent student with and without expenditure on research and ancillary serviceseduc_bo_fi_ffun: Tertiary education institutions' income from private sources (households and other private entities) as % of all public and private sourceseduc_bo_fi_fiaid: Public financial aid to tertiary students (ISCED 5-6), by type of aid, as % of public expenditure on tertiary education C. Student and staff mobility educ_bo_mo_el8o: Students (ISCED 5A and 6) who are nationals of a given country, studying in another country (EU-27, EFTA and CC) as % of the total enrolment in that countryeduc_bo_mo_el8i: Number of foreign students (world and Bologna Area) studying in a given country, as % of the total enrolment in that country, ISCED 5A and 6educ_bo_mo_gr4: Graduates (ISCED 5A and 6) from abroad (non-citizens, permanent residence and prior education outside the country) D. Effective outcomes and employability educ_bo_ou_gren: Gross graduation rate and net entry rate, ISCED 5A   The data for some countries which do not participate in the UOE data collection were provided to Eurostat specifically for the monitoring of the Bologna Process. Not being fully integrated in the UOE, the data sometimes might not be as comparable as the data for the remaining countries, due to differences in the underlying data sources and definitions. These data were provided by the following entities: Andorra (AD): data provided by the University of Andorra (indicators educ_bo_ac_ent3, educ_bo_fi_ffun, educ_bo_mo_el8i, educ_bo_mo_gr4)Armenia (AM): data provided by the Ministry of Education and Science (educ_bo_ac_gent, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_mo_gr4, educ_bo_ou_gren)Georgia (GE): data provided by the NSI, Statistics Georgia (educ_bo_ac_ent3, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_fi_fgdp, educ_bo_mo_gr4)Serbia (RS): data provided by the NSI, Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia (educ_bo_mo_el8i)Ukraine (UA): data provided by the NSI, State Statistics Committee for Ukraine (educ_bo_ou_gren, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_mo_el8i, educ_bo_mo_gr4, educ_bo_ou_gren)
    • June 2014
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 December, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:educ_enrl8 The aim of the education statistics domain is to provide comparable statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data cover participation and completion of education programmes by pupils and students, personnel in education and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The standards on international statistics on education and training systems are set by the three international organisations jointly administering the UOE data collection:the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation Institute for Statistics (UNESCO-UIS),the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and,the Statistical Office of the European Union (EUROSTAT). The following topics are covered:Context - School-aged population, overall participation rates in educationDistribution of pupils/students by levelParticipation/enrolment in education (ISCED 0-4)Tertiary education participationTertiary education graduatesTeaching staff (ISCED 1-3)Pupil/students-teacher ratio and average class size (ISCED 1-3)Language learning (ISCED 1-3)Regional enrolmentsExpenditure on education in current pricesExpenditure on education in constant pricesExpenditure on education as % of GDP or public expenditureExpenditure on public and private educational institutionsFinancial aid to studentsFunding of education Other tables, used to measure progress towards the Lisbon objectives in education and training, are gathered in the Thematic indicators tables. They contain the following indicators: - Teachers and trainers - Mathematics, science and technology enrolments and graduates - Investments in education and training - Participation rates in education by age and sex - Foreign language learning - Student mobility
    • January 2017
      Source: U.S. Census Bureau
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 January, 2017
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    • June 2016
      Source: Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 July, 2016
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    • July 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2015
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    • June 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 May, 2016
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    • March 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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    • July 2016
      Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2016
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      World and National CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Cement Manufacture, and Gas Flaring. Source: Tom Boden, Gregg Marland and Bob Andres (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)
    • June 2016
      Source: Fund for Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      The FSI focuses on the indicators of risk and is based on thousands of articles and reports that are processed by our CAST Software from electronically available sources. Measures of fragility, like Demographic Pressures,Refugees and IDPs and etc., have been scaled on 0 to 10 where 10 is highest fragility and 0 no fragility.
    • January 2017
      Source: Freedom House
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2017
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      Freedom in the World is Freedom House’s flagship annual report, assessing the condition of political rights and civil liberties around the world. It is composed of numerical ratings and supporting descriptive texts for 195 countries and 15 territories. Freedom in the World has been published since 1973, allowing Freedom House to track global trends in freedom over more than 40 years. It has become the most widely read and cited report of its kind, used on a regular basis by policymakers, journalists, academics, activists, and many others.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 September, 2016
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      This dataset shows the state and changes over time in the abstractions of freshwater resources in OECD countries. Water abstractions are a major pressure on freshwater resources, particularly from public water supplies, irrigation, industrial processes and cooling of electric power plants. It has significant implications for issues of quantity and quality of water resources. This dataset shows water abstractions by source (surface and ground water) and by major uses. Water abstractions refer to water taken from ground or surface water sources and conveyed to the place of use. If the water is returned to a surface water source, abstraction of the same water by the downstream user is counted again in compiling total withdrawal. When interpreting those data, it should be borne in mind that the definitions and estimation methods employed by Member countries may vary considerably among countries.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 November, 2016
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      This table contains data on full-time and part-time employment based on a common definition of 30-usual weekly hours of work in the main job. Data are broken down by professional status - employees, total employment - sex and standardised age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55+, total). Unit of measure used - Data are expressed in thousands of persons.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2016
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      This table contains data on full-time and part-time employment based on national definition. Data are broken down by professional status - employees, total employment - sex and standardised age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55+, total). Unit of measure used - Data are expressed in thousands of persons
    • November 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 February, 2016
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      Data include pension funds per the OECD classification by type of pension plans and by type of pension funds. All types of plans are included (occupational and personal, mandatory and voluntary). The OECD classification considers both funded and book reserved pension plans that are workplace-based (occupational pension plans) or accessed directly in retail markets (personal pension plans). Both mandatory and voluntary arrangements are included. The data include plans where benefits are paid by a private sector entity (classified as private pension plans by the OECD) as well as those paid by a funded public sector entity. A full description of the OECD classification can be found at:http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/0/49/38356329.pdf. Pension funds include also some personal pension arrangements like the Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) in the United States as well as funds for government workers. The coverage of the statistics follows the regulatory and supervisory framework. All authorised pension funds are therefore normally covered by the Global Pension Statistics exercise. Assets pertaining to reserve funds in social security systems are excluded.
    • February 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 February, 2016
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      Data include pension funds per the OECD classification by type of pension plans and by type of pension funds. All types of plans are included (occupational and personal, mandatory and voluntary). The OECD classification considers both funded and book reserved pension plans that are workplace-based (occupational pension plans) or accessed directly in retail markets (personal pension plans). Both mandatory and voluntary arrangements are included. The data include plans where benefits are paid by a private sector entity (classified as private pension plans by the OECD) as well as those paid by a funded public sector entity. A full description of the OECD classification can be found at: http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/0/49/38356329.pdf. Pension funds include also some personal pension arrangements like the Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) in the United States as well as funds for government workers. The coverage of the statistics follows the regulatory and supervisory framework. All authorised pension funds are therefore normally covered by the Global Pension Statistics exercise. Assets pertaining to reserve funds in social security systems are excluded.
  • G
    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 January, 2017
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      The G20 CPI has been calculated for the headline indicators only (CPI All items / HICP Total). It is an annual chain-linked Laspeyres-type index. The weights for each country in each link are based on the previous year's relative share of individual final consumption expenditure of households and non-profit institutions serving households expressed in Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs). Other Aspects Recommended uses and limitations The G20 consists of the following economies: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the European Union. The G20 aggregate is calculated taking the fifteen individual country members of the G20 (other than France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom) plus the European Union as an aggregate. In calculating the monthly percentage change of the CPI G20 aggregate, the officially reported data for Argentina have been used. Data from January 2014 onwards exclude Argentina during 2014 for annual inflation rates and index series (2010=100).
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 December, 2016
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      Consumer price indices (CPIs) measure inflation as price changes of a representative basket of goods and services typically purchased by households. The G20 CPI aggregate reflects national CPIs for all G20 countries (with the exception of Turkey) that are not part of the European Union (EU) while it reflects the Harmonised Indices of Consumer Prices (HICP) for the EU, its Member States and for Turkey. It is an annual chain-linked Laspeyres-type index. The weights for each country in each link are based on the previous year’s relative share of individual final consumption expenditure of households and non-profit institutions serving households expressed in Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs). The table presents the data for all non-EU countries. The HICP tables for France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the euro area and European Union can be found under the HICP tables.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2016
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      GDP per Capita, in International Comparable Prices by Country/Region, Expenditure and Year, 1990-2015
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 May, 2016
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    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 December, 2016
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    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2016
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    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2016
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      Gender pay gap by level of education, 2015
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 November, 2016
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      Gender Pay Gap, 2015
    • February 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 February, 2015
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      The GID-DB is a database providing researchers and policymakers with key data on gender-based discrimination in social institutions. This data helps analyse women’s economic empowerment and understand gender gaps in other key areas of development. Covering 160 countries, the GID-DB contains comprehensive information on legal, cultural and traditional practices that discriminate against women and girls.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
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      It provides a faithful image, to the greatest extent possible, of the aggregates and balances of the general government sector in the SNA 1993 conceptual framework. In addition, it brings to light two relevant aggregates that do not belong to this conceptual frame work: the Total Revenue and the Total Expenditure of the general government sector.Unit of measure used - National currency; current prices. Expressed in millions.
    • February 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 February, 2015
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      This part contains general information on number of insurance companies and employees within the sector.
    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 December, 2016
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      This table contains deflators for resource flows for individual DAC Members from 1966 as well as the TOTAL DAC deflator, and the deflator for the EURO (EC).The deflators include the effect of exchange rate changes and are therefore only applicable to US dollar figures.The OECD uses the latest deflator to convert current prices to constant prices. The latest available base year used is the base year equal to 100.The OECD applies the total DAC deflator to individual recipient countries and multilateral donors to calculate their receipts or flows in constant prices.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 July, 2016
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      Bilateral ODA commitments by purpose. Data cover the years 2005 to 2009. Amounts are expressed in USD million. The sectoral distribution of bilateral ODA commitments refers to the economic sector of destination (i.e. the specific area of the recipient's economic or social structure whose development is, or is intended to be fostered by the aid), rather than to the type of goods or services provided. These are aggregates of individual projects notified under the Creditor Reporting System, supplemented by reporting on the sectoral distribution of technical co-operation, and on actual disbursements of food and emergency aid.
    • February 2016
      Source: Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 August, 2016
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      Direct greenhouse gases: Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Methane (CH4), Nitrous Oxide (N2O), Hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-23, 32, 125, 134a, 143a, 152a, 227ea, 236fa, 245fa, 365mfc, 43-10-mee), Perfluorocarbons (PFCs: CF4, C2F6, C3F8, c-C4F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Nitrogen Trifluoride (NF3) and Sulfuryl Fluoride (SO2F2). Emissions are calculated by individual countries using country-specific information. The countries are organized in different world regions for illustration purposes. Emissions of some small countries are presented together with other countries depending on country definition and availability of activity statistics. Source: European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC)/PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency.
    • September 2016
      Source: Knight Frank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 October, 2016
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      Note: Countries are ranked according to 12-month price growth. The Knight Frank Global House Price Index established in 2006 allows investors and developers to monitor and compare the performance of mainstream residential markets across the world. The index is compiled on a quarterly basis using official government statistics or central bank data where available. The index’s overall performance is weighted by GDP and the latest quarter’s data is provisional pending the release of all the countries’ results.
    • October 2015
      Source: HelpAge International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2015
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      The aim of the Index is both to capture the multidimensional nature of the quality of life and wellbeing of older people, and to provide a means by which to measure performance and promote improvements. We have chosen 13 different indicators for the four key domains of Income security, Health status, Capability, and Enabling environment. Domain 1: Income security The income security domain assesses people's access to a sufficient amount of income, and the capacity to use it independently, in order to meet basic needs in older age. Domain 2: Health status The three indicators used for the health domain provide information about physical and psychological wellbeing. Domain 3: Capability The employment and education indicators in this domain look at different aspects of the empowerment of older people. Domain 4: Enabling environment This domain uses data from Gallup World View to assess older people's perception of social connectedness, safety, civic freedom and access to public transport - issues older people have singled out as particularly important.
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      This database contains statistics on production volume and value by species, country or area, fishing area and culture environment
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      Contains the volume of fish catches landed by country or territory of capture, by species or a higher taxonomic level, by FAO major fishing areas, and year for all commercial, industrial, recreational and subsistence purpose
    • June 2016
      Source: Deloitte
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 June, 2016
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      With the release of the 2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index (GMCI), Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (Deloitte Global) and the Council on Competitiveness (the Council) in the US build upon the GMCI research, with prior studies published in 2010 and 2013. The results of the 2016 study clearly show the ongoing influence manufacturing has on driving global economies. From its influence on infrastructure development, job creation, and contribution to gross domestic product (GDP) on both an overall and per capita basis, a strong manufacturing sector creates a clear path toward economic prosperity.
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      This database contains statistics on the annual production of fishery commodities and imports and exports of fishery commodities by country and commodities in terms of volume and value from 1976.
    • November 2016
      Source: DHL
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2016
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      DHL released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI), a detailed analysis of the state of globalization around the world. The latest report, authored by internationally acclaimed globalization expert Professor Pankaj Ghemawat together with Steven A. Altman, shows that global connectedness, measured by cross-border flows of trade, capital, information and people, has recovered most of its losses incurred during the financial crisis. Especially the depth of international interactions – the proportion of interactions that cross national borders – gained momentum in 2013 after its recovery had stalled in the previous year. Nonetheless, trade depth, as a distinct dimension of globalization, continues to stagnate and the overall level of global connectedness remains quite limited, implying that there could be gains of trillions of US dollars if boosted in future years.
    • February 2015
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2015
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      The aim of this data set is to provide a snapshot of where countries stand in their cybersecurity engagement at the national level. The visions as seen by ABI Research and ITU is to promote cybersecurity awareness and the important role governments have to play in integrating appropriate mechanisms to both support and promote this crucial discipline. Safeguarding the integrity of cyberspace must involve the development of cybersecurity.
    • December 2015
      Source: Global Democracy Ranking
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 January, 2016
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      The Democracy Ranking is an annual ranking of all democracies (country-based democracies) in the world by focusing on the Quality of Democracy in an international perspective. The Democracy Ranking publishes the ranking scores and displays ranking score increases or decreases over time. The Democracy Ranking is a ranking of the Quality of Democracy in the sense that the ranking scores should reflect a ranking of democracies according to their differing qualities; and the Democracy Ranking is a ranking for the Quality of Democracy, because it wants to contribute conceptually to how democracy quality may be measured as well as wants to support the awareness how important democracy quality is for the further development, reform and enhancement of democracies.
    • August 2015
      Source: Grant Thornton
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2015
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      The Grant Thornton Global Dynamism Index (GDI) ranks 60 leading economies on their dynamism in five key areas – business operating environment, economics & growth, science & technology, labour & human capital and financing environment. The GDI analyses 22 indicators across these five categories to assess the dynamism of business growth environments around the world, where dynamism refers to the changes in an economy over the past 12 months which are likely to lead to a faster future rate of growth.
    • January 2013
      Source: Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 June, 2013
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      Emissions are calculated for the following substances: 1) Direct greenhouse gases: Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Methane (CH4), Nitrous Oxide (N2O), Hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-23, 32, 125, 134a, 143a, 152a, 227ea, 236fa, 245fa, 365mfc, 43-10-mee), Perfluorocarbons (PFCs: CF4, C2F6, C3F8, c-C4F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Nitrogen Trifluoride (NF3) and Sulfuryl Fluoride (SO2F2); 2) Ozone precursor gases: Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOC) and Methane (CH4). 3) Acidifying gases: Ammonia (NH3), Nitrogen oxides (NOx) and Sulfur Dioxide (SO2). 4) Primary particulates: Fine Particulate Matter (PM10) - Carbonaceous speciation (BC , OC) is under progress. 5) Stratospheric Ozone Depleting Substances: Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, 12, 113, 114, 115), Halons (1211, 1301, 2402), Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC-22, 124, 141b, 142b), Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4), Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) and Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl2). Emissions (EM) for a country C are calculated for each compound x on an annual basis (y) and sector wise (for i sectors, multiplying on the one hand the country-specific activity data (AD), quantifying the human activity for each of the i sectors, with the mix of j technologies (TECH) for each sector i, and with their abatement percentage by one of the k end-of-pipe (EOP) measures for each technology j, and on the other hand the country-specific emission factor (EF) for each sector i and technology j with relative reduction (RED) of the uncontrolled emission by installed abatement measure k. Emissions in are calculated by individual countries using country-specific information. The countries are organized in different world regions for illustration purposes. Emissions of some small countries are presented together with other countries depending on country definition and availability of activity statistics.
    • December 2015
      Source: Global Energy Network Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      Data for 2005 but still gives a general idea as to the status of Japan compared to other developed countries.
    • June 2016
      Source: Enerdata
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 August, 2016
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      Enerdata is an independent Research & Consulting firm on the global oil, gas, coal, power, renewable and carbon markets established in 1991. Total energy consumption - for each energy product it is the sum of primary production, external trade, marine bunkers (fuel used by boats and aircraft for international transport) and stock variations. For the world, marine bunkers are included. This induces a gap with the sum of regions. Total primary production evaluates the quantity of natural energy resources. Total balance of trade is the difference between exports and imports. The balance of a net exporter appears as a negative value (-). The balance of geographic and geopolitical zones is simply the sum of the trade balance of all the countries. The energy intensity is calculated by dividing the total energy consumption of a country by its Gross Domestic Product (GDP). It measures the total amount of energy necessary to generate one unit of GDP. GDP is expressed at constant exchange rate and purchasing power parity to remove the impact of inflation and reflect differences in general price levels and relate energy consumption to the real level of economic activity. Using purchasing power parity rates for GDP instead of exchange rates increases the value of GDP in regions with a low cost of living, and therefore decreases their energy intensities. Total energy includes coal, gas, oil, electricity, heat and biomass.
    • May 2016
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship and Development Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2016
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      Global Entrepreneurship Index provides information about global entrepreneurship subIndex ranks and scoring of all countries.It also provides information about certain indicators like attitudes,abilities and aspirations with their ranks and scores
    • March 2016
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 March, 2016
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      The GEM Adult Population Survey (APS) measures the level and nature of entrepreneurial activity around the world. It is administered to a representative national sample of at least 2000 respondents.The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.  
    • March 2016
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 March, 2016
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      The GEM National Expert Survey (NES) monitors the factors that are believed to have a significant impact on entrepreneurship, known as the Entrepreneurial Framework Conditions (EFCs). It is administered to a minimum of 36 carefully chosen 'experts' in each country. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.
    • June 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      The Global Financial Development Database is an extensive dataset of financial system characteristics for countries and group-wise economies. The database includes measures of (1) size of financial institutions and markets (financial depth), (2) degree to which individuals can and do use financial services (access), (3) efficiency of financial intermediaries and markets in intermediating resources and facilitating financial transactions (efficiency), and (4) stability of financial institutions and markets (stability). For a complete description of the dataset and a discussion of the underlying literature, see: Martin Cihák, Asli Demirgüç-Kunt, Erik Feyen, and Ross Levine, 2012. Benchmarking Financial Systems Around the World.World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 6175, World Bank, Washington, D.C. Concepts: The Kruskal-Wallis H test (sometimes also called the "one-way ANOVA on ranks") is a rank-based nonparametric test that can be used to determine if there are statistically significant differences between two or more groups of an independent variable on a continuous or ordinal dependent variable. The Z score method examines liquidity, profitability, reinvested earnings and leverage which are integrated into a single composite score. It can be used with past, current or projected data as it requires no external inputs such as GDP or Market Price. Z-Score Ratings cutoff scores used in classifications: AAA 8.15, AA 7.30, A 6.65 , BBB 5.85, BB 4.95, B 4.15, CCC 3.20, D 3.19
    • April 2015
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 June, 2015
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      The Global Financial Inclusion Database provides 800 country-level indicators of financial inclusion summarized for all adults and disaggregated by key demographic characteristics-gender, age, education, income, and rural residence. Covering more than 140 economies, the indicators of financial inclusion measure how people save, borrow, make payments and manage risk. The reference citation for the data is: Demirguc-Kunt, Asli, Leora Klapper, Dorothe Singer, and Peter Van Oudheusden. 2015. “The Global Findex Database 2014: Measuring Financial Inclusion around the World.” Policy Research Working Paper 7255, World Bank, Washington, DC. Note: 1: Variable [w1] refers to 2011 variables 2: Variable [w2] refers to 2014 variables 3: Variable [ts] refers to Time Series variables (2011, 2014)
    • October 2014
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 February, 2016
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      Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) finds that six years after the start of the crisis, the global economic recovery continues to rely heavily on accommodative monetary policies in advanced economies. Monetary accommodation remains critical in supporting the economy by encouraging economic risk taking in the form of increased real spending by households and greater willingness to invest and hire by businesses. However, prolonged monetary ease may also encourage excessive financial risk taking.
    • April 2016
      Source: GFP
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 May, 2016
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      Global Firepower (GFP) provides a unique analytical display of data concerning today's world military powers. Over 1000 world powers are considering in the ranking which allows for a broad spectrum of comparisons to be achieved concerning relative military strengths. The user should note that nuclear capability is not taken into account as that would defeat the purpose of such comparisons. Instead, the GFP ranking is based strictly on each nations potential conventional war-making capabilities across land, sea and air. The final ranking also incorporates values related to resources, finances and geography. Some statistics have been estimated where official numbers are not publicly available. The GFP ranking is based on a formula utilizing over fifty different factors, compiled and measured against each nation. Bonuses (ex: low oil consumption) and penalties (ex: high oil consumption) are applied to further refine the list. The finalized GFP value is recognized as the "Power Index" (PwrIndx) which supplies a nation its respective positioning in the rankings. Note : • Nuclear capability is NOT taken into account • Geographical factors influence every country's ranking • Ranking does not solely rely on total number of weapons available • Natural resource reliance (use/production) is taken into account • Land-locked nations are NOT penalized for lack of a standing navy • Naval powers ARE penalized for limited naval capabilities • Current political/military leadership is NOT taken into account
    • June 2016
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 August, 2016
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      The Global Food Security Index 2016: An annual measure of the state of global food security, is the second edition of an Economist Intelligence Unit study, commissioned by DuPont.
    • September 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 October, 2015
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      DescriptionThe Global Forest Resources Assessment 2015 (FRA 2015) is the most comprehensive assessment of forests and forestry to date - not only in terms of the number of countries and people involved - but also in terms of scope. It examines the current status and recent trends for about 90 variables covering the extent, condition, uses and values of forests and other wooded land, with the aim of assessing all benefits from forest resources. Information has been collated from 233 countries and territories for four points in time: 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010. The results are presented according to the seven thematic elements of sustainable forest management. FAO worked closely with countries and specialists in the design and implementation of FRA 2010 - through regular contact, expert consultations, training for national correspondents and ten regional and subregional workshops. More than 900 contributors were involved, including 178 officially nominated national correspondents and their teams. The outcome is better data, a transparent reporting process and enhanced national capacity in developing countries for data analysis and reporting. The final report of FRA 2010 was published at the start of the latest biennial meeting of the FAO' Committee on Forestry and World Forest Week, in Rome.
    • November 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2016
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      This data set provides the Index benchmarks national gender gaps on economic, political, education and health criteria, and provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups. The rankings are designed to create greater awareness among a global audience of the challenges posed by gender gaps and the opportunities created by reducing them. The methodology and quantitative analysis behind the rankings are intended to serve as a basis for designing effective measures for reducing gender gaps. Score,1=No inequality, 0=Maximum inequality. Rank,1=Minimum inequality
    • September 2016
      Source: Dual Citizen LLC
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 December, 2016
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      This 5th edition of the Global Green Economy Index (GGEI) is a data-driven analysis of how 80 countries perform in the global green economy, as well as how expert practitioners rank this performance. Since its launch in 2010, the GGEI has signaled which countries are making progress towards greener economies, and which ones are not. The comparison of national green performance and perceptions of it revealed through the GGEI framework is more important than ever today. This is because while there is far greater public and political focus on climate change and green growth now than when the GGEI was first published, often the commitments and targets communicated by leaders do not match the reality. This report will provide an overview of the newest GGEI results from the 5th edition, as well as more detail on how our research and data can enrich the work of others in this space.
    • September 2016
      Source: World Health Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 December, 2016
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      The GHO data provides access to indicators on priority health topics including mortality and burden of diseases, the Millennium Development Goals (child nutrition, child health, maternal and reproductive health, immunization, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, neglected diseases, water and sanitation), non communicable diseases and risk factors, epidemic-prone diseases, health systems, environmental health, violence and injuries, equity among others
    • July 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 January, 2017
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      This Dataset contains proprietary and non-proprietary data used in the computation of the World Economic's Forum Networked Readiness Index. By making this data available, the Forum aims to inform multi-stakeholder dialogue, foster evidence-based, data-driven decisions, allow measuring progress, and support research by academia, journalists and others.
    • May 2016
      Source: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 May, 2016
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      Global Internal Displacement Database (GIDD) aims to provide comprehensive information on internal displacement worldwide. It covers all countries and territories for which IDMC has obtained data on situations of internal displacement, and provides data on situations of internal displacement associated with conflict and generalized violence (2014-2015), displacement associated with sudden-onset natural hazard-related disasters (2008-2015).
    • February 2016
      Source: Material Flows
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 June, 2016
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    • December 2015
      Source: Global Open Data Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 July, 2016
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    • June 2016
      Source: Institute for Economics and Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 July, 2016
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      The 2016 Global Peace Index overall score deteriorated slightly compared with 2015, and at a faster rate than the previous year. Once again, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) was the region that saw its levels of peace deteriorate the most. Four regions scored worse than the previous year, while three other regions improved and two remained the same.
    • May 2014
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Kirill Kosenkov
      Accessed On: 27 August, 2015
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      Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980–2013. Comparable estimates based on systematically identified surveys, reports, and published studies (n=1769) that included data for height and weight, both through physical measurements and self-reports, using mixed effects linear regression to correct for bias in self-reports. Data for prevalence of obesity and overweight by age, sex, country, and year (n=19 244) obtained with a spatiotemporal Gaussian process regression model to estimate prevalence with 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). Research by the staff of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evalutaion with co-authors. Published online 28 May 2014, "The Lancet" Volume 384, No. 9945, p766–781. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60460-8
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      Contains global production statistics (capture and aquaculture). This database contains the volume of aquatic species caught by country or area, by species items, by FAO major fishing areas, and year, for all commercial, industrial, recreational and subsistence purposes. The harvest from mariculture, aquaculture and other kinds of fish farming is also included
    • February 2015
      Source: Jones Lang LaSalle
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 April, 2015
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      JLL’s Global Real Estate Transparency Index is a unique survey that quantifies real estate market transparency across 102 markets worldwide.The Index aims to help real estate investors, corporate occupiers, retailers and hotel operators understand important differences when transacting, owning and operating in foreign markets.
    • April 2014
      Source: United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 May, 2016
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      Intentional homicide is defined as unlawful death purposefully inflicted on a person by another person
    • December 2015
      Source: INSEAD
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 October, 2016
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      55This data presents high-level way of mapping individual countries in terms of talent competitiveness consists of comparing their GTCI scores to their GDP per capita for the selected indicators.In its first year, the GTCI model covers 103 countries,representing 86.3% of the world’s population and 96.7% of the world’s GDP (in current US dollars).It is a simplified manner of acquiring a first assessment about the ways in which competitiveness relates to overall level of economic development of a nation.
    • May 2011
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 January, 2015
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      The Global Talen Index Report: The Outlook to 2015
    • June 2016
      Source: KPMG
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 September, 2016
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      Covers data on corporate, indirect and individual income tax rates throughout 163 countries across the world during the period from 2006 to 2016. Provided by KPMG.
    • November 2016
      Source: Institute for Economics and Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2016
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      The Global Terrorism Index (GTI) is a comprehensive study which accounts for the direct and indirect impact of terrorism in 163 countries in terms of its effect on lives lost, injuries, property damage and the psychological aftereffects of terrorism. This study covers 99.6 per cent of the world’s population. It aggregates the most authoritative data source on terrorism today, the Global Terrorism Database (GTD) collated by the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) into a composite score in order to provide an ordinal ranking of nations on the negative impact of terrorism. The GTD is unique in that it consists of systematically and comprehensively coded data on domestic as well as international terrorist incidents and now includes more than 140,000 cases. Note: "Change in score values" have been calculated for 2015 by score in 2015 minus score in 2014 (Score_2015-Score_2014). For rest of the years according to source.
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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    • December 2014
      Source: World Wide Web Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      The Web has changed our lives. But to harness its full benefit, we need to understand how countries and people use it, and its impact on on development and human rights. The Web Index, by the World Wide Web Foundation, tracks the Web’s contribution to social, economic and political progress across 86 countries. It ranks these nations across four pillars: Universal Access, Freedom and Openness, Empowerment and Relevant Content.
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2016
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      Globalization indicators by Country, Indicator and Year, 1990-2015
    • July 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 September, 2016
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      This table is a compilation of statistics of trade in goods and services as reported in the Balance of Payments. The conceptual framework used for the compilation is based on the IMF Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5, 1993).
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2016
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      This table shows exports, imports and sum/average of exports and imports as percentage of nominal gross domestic product (GDP). The indicators are calculated for trade in goods, trade in services and total trade in goods and services.
    • August 2014
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 August, 2014
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      This table shows indicators of trade balances as the following: - Normalized trade balance, - Trade balance as percentage of imports and, - Trade balance as percentage of nominal gross domestic product (GDP).
    • August 2014
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 August, 2014
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      This table shows exports, imports and sum/average of exports and imports as percentage of nominal gross domestic product (GDP). The indicators are calculated for trade in goods, trade in services and total trade in goods and services.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 March, 2016
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      Key statistical concept Although there are clear definitions for all the terms used in this survey, countries might have different methodologies to calculate tonne-kilometer and passenger-kilometers. Methods could be based on traffic or mobility surveys, use very different sampling methods and estimating techniques which could affect the comparability of their statistics. Also, if the definition on road fatalities is very clear and well applied by most coutries, this is not the case for road injuies. Indeed, not only countries might have different definitions but the important underreporting of road injuries in most countries can distort analysis based on these data.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 October, 2016
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      This table presents data on Government appropriations or outlays for RD (GBAORD) by socio-economic objective (SEO), using the NABS 2007 classification i.e.: Exploration and exploitation of the Earth, Environment, Exploration and exploitation of space, Transport, telecommunication and other infrastructures, Energy, Industrial production and technology, Health, Agriculture, Education, Culture, recreation, religion and mass media, Political and social systems, structures and processes, General advancement of knowledge: RD financed from General University Funds (GUF), General advancement of knowledge: RD financed from sources other than GUF, Defence. Please note that in this new NABS 2007 classification, the three socio-economic objectives -- Education, Culture, recreation, religion and mass media, and Political and social systems, structures and processes -- were previously grouped under a single objective: Social structures and relationships. At the time of this publication there is no breakdown of historical data into the three new SEOs. Another issue relating to the transition from NABS 1993 to NABS 2007 is that what was formerly Other civil research is now to be distributed among the other chapters. This distribution has not yet been done in this database. Therefore, until the countries are in a position to provide breakdown according to the NABS 2007 classification, in some cases GBAORD by SEO is greater than the sum of its chapters.
    • July 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 August, 2014
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      It provides a breakdown of government expenditure according to their function. To meet this end, economic flows of expenditure must be aggregated according to the Classification of the Functions of Government (COFOG).
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 July, 2016
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      The Fisheries Committee (COFI) from the Trade and Agriculture Directorate (TAD) collects, on an annual basis from all its participating countries, data on landings, aquaculture production, fleet, employment in the fisheries sector, and government financial transfers. Data are collected from Fisheries Ministries, National Statistics Offices and other institution designated as an official data source.
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2016
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      Government Ministers by sex, 2016
    • January 2016
      Source: National Science Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 March, 2016
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      1. RD & D stands for Research, Development and Demonstration2. Clean energy and other non-fossil fuel technologies include renewables (solar, wind, biofuels, ocean energy, and hydropower), nuclear, hydrogen and fuel cells, CO2 capture and storage, other power and storage, and energy efficiency 3.Data collected from table 6-54 to 6-64
    • December 2009
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 May, 2014
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:educ_bo_mo_gr4 The Bologna declaration was signed in 1999 by 29 European ministers responsible for higher education. Today, 46 signatory countries are engaged in the process towards a European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The Bologna Process is an intergovernmental initiative which also involves the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO-CEPES, as well as representatives of higher education institutions, students, staff, employers and quality assurance agencies. It aims to create a European Higher Education Area by 2010, and to promote the European system of higher education worldwide. More information on the Bologna process is available on http://ec.europa.eu/education/higher-education/doc1290_en.htm. Many indicators on social dimension and mobility in the Bologna process come from the UOE data collection in the education statistics domain. The aim of the education statistics domain is to provide comparable statistics and indicators on key aspects of the education systems across Europe. The data cover participation and completion of education programmes, personnel in education and the cost and type of resources dedicated to education. The main source of data is the joint UIS (UNESCO Institute of Statistics)/OECD/Eurostat (UOE) questionnaires on education statistics, which constitute the core database on education. Data on regional enrolments and foreign language learning are collected additionally by Eurostat. Countries provide data, coming from administrative records, on the basis of commonly agreed definitions. From the UOE data collection, the following datasets on the Bologna Process are available: A. Widening access educ_bo_ac_ent2: Net entry rate (ISCED 5A) by age and sexeduc_bo_ac_ent3: Female entrants by field of education (ISCED 5A)educ_bo_ac_gent: Entrants at ISCED 5A and qualifying graduates of secondary schooling (ISCED 3A - 4A)educ_bo_ac_el1t: Students (ISCED 5A) studying part-time, by age B. Study framework educ_bo_fi_fgdp: Public expenditure on tertiary education (ISCED 5-6), as % of GDP or total public expenditureeduc_bo_fi_ftot: Annual total expenditure on educational institutions (ISCED 5-6) per full-time equivalent student with and without expenditure on research and ancillary serviceseduc_bo_fi_ffun: Tertiary education institutions' income from private sources (households and other private entities) as % of all public and private sourceseduc_bo_fi_fiaid: Public financial aid to tertiary students (ISCED 5-6), by type of aid, as % of public expenditure on tertiary education C. Student and staff mobility educ_bo_mo_el8o: Students (ISCED 5A and 6) who are nationals of a given country, studying in another country (EU-27, EFTA and CC) as % of the total enrolment in that countryeduc_bo_mo_el8i: Number of foreign students (world and Bologna Area) studying in a given country, as % of the total enrolment in that country, ISCED 5A and 6educ_bo_mo_gr4: Graduates (ISCED 5A and 6) from abroad (non-citizens, permanent residence and prior education outside the country) D. Effective outcomes and employability educ_bo_ou_gren: Gross graduation rate and net entry rate, ISCED 5A   The data for some countries which do not participate in the UOE data collection were provided to Eurostat specifically for the monitoring of the Bologna Process. Not being fully integrated in the UOE, the data sometimes might not be as comparable as the data for the remaining countries, due to differences in the underlying data sources and definitions. These data were provided by the following entities: Andorra (AD): data provided by the University of Andorra (indicators educ_bo_ac_ent3, educ_bo_fi_ffun, educ_bo_mo_el8i, educ_bo_mo_gr4)Armenia (AM): data provided by the Ministry of Education and Science (educ_bo_ac_gent, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_mo_gr4, educ_bo_ou_gren)Georgia (GE): data provided by the NSI, Statistics Georgia (educ_bo_ac_ent3, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_fi_fgdp, educ_bo_mo_gr4)Serbia (RS): data provided by the NSI, Statistical Office of the Republic of Serbia (educ_bo_mo_el8i)Ukraine (UA): data provided by the NSI, State Statistics Committee for Ukraine (educ_bo_ou_gren, educ_bo_ac_el1t, educ_bo_mo_el8i, educ_bo_mo_gr4, educ_bo_ou_gren)
    • February 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 March, 2016
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      Graduates are those who successfully complete an educational programme during the reference year of the data collection. One condition of a successful completion is that students should have enrolled in, and successfully completed, the final year of the corresponding educational programme, although not necessarily in the year of reference. Students who do not complete the final year of an educational programme, but later successfully complete a recognised "equivalency" examination based on knowledge learned outside of the education system, should not be counted as graduates. Successful completion is defined according to the graduation requirements established by each country: in some countries, completion occurs as a result of passing a final, curriculum-based examination or series of examinations. In other countries, completion occurs after a specific number of teaching hours has been accumulated (although completion of some or all of the course hours may also involve examinations).
    • September 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2014
      Select Dataset
      Graduates are those who successfully complete an educational programme during the reference year of the data collection. One condition of a successful completion is that students should have enrolled in, and successfully completed, the final year of the corresponding educational programme, although not necessarily in the year of reference. Students who do not complete the final year of an educational programme, but later successfully complete a recognised "equivalency" examination based on knowledge learned outside of the education system, should not be counted as graduates. Successful completion is defined according to the graduation requirements established by each country: in some countries, completion occurs as a result of passing a final, curriculum-based examination or series of examinations. In other countries, completion occurs after a specific number of teaching hours has been accumulated (although completion of some or all of the course hours may also involve examinations).
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Graduates from an ISCED level are individuals who entered and successfully completed an education programme which is classified as ‘level completion’. A new version of the International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED 2011) was adopted in 2011 by experts on Education Statistics. According to ISCED-11, the graduates refer to those who successfully completed levels 6, 7 or 8 of tertiary education. Programmes at ISCED-11 level 6, or Bachelor’s or equivalent level, are often designed to provide participants with intermediate academic and/or professional knowledge, skills and competencies, leading to a first university degree or equivalent qualification. Programmes at ISCED-11 level 7, or Master’s or equivalent level, provide participants with advanced academic and/or professional knowledge, skills and competencies, leading to a second degree or equivalent qualification. Such programmes may have a substantial research component but do not yet lead to the award of an advanced research qualification. Level 8 in ISCED-11, or doctoral or equivalent level, is reserved for tertiary programmes leading to the award of an advanced research qualification. According to ISCED-97 (previously in use), the ‘level completion’ programmes include levels 5A and 6. ISCED-97 level 5A corresponds to tertiary programmes that are largely theoretically based and are intended to provide sufficient qualifications for gaining entry into advanced research programmes and professions with high skill requirements. However, these programmes do not necessary distinguish between a first and second academic degree. Level 6 in ISCED-97 corresponds to level 8 in ISCED-11. For most countries the data on graduates in this table are shown according to ISCED-97 up to 2012 and according to ISCED-11 from 2013. However, for some countries the data were recalculated by the National Statistical Organizations according to ISCED-11 for earlier periods and provided both for ISCED-11 and ISCED-97 . In these particular cases, the sum of graduates at ISCED-11 levels 6 and 7 equals graduates at ISCED-97 level 5A, and, to avoid duplication, the data for every year are shown according to ISCED-11 only.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
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      This dataset contains selected indicators for monitoring progress towards green growth to support policy making and inform the public at large. The indicator bring together the OECD's statistics, indicators and measures of progress. The dataset covers OECD countries as well as BRIICS economies (Brazil, Russian Federation, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa), and selected countries when possible. The indicators are selected according to well specified criteria and embedded in a conceptual framework, which is structured around four groups to capture the main features of green growth: Environmental and resource productivity, to indicate whether economic growth is becoming greener with more efficient use of natural capital and to capture aspects of production which are rarely quantified in economic models and accounting frameworks; The natural asset base, to indicate the risks to growth from a declining natural asset base; Environmental quality of life, to indicate how environmental conditions affect the quality of life and wellbeing of people; Economic opportunities and policy responses, to indicate the effectiveness ofpolicies in delivering green growth and describe the societal responses needed to secure business and employment opportunities.
    • July 2014
      Source: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 July, 2014
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      In accordance with Articles 4 and 12 of the Climate Change Convention, and the relevant decisions of the Conference of the Parties, countries that are Parties to the Convention submit national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories to the Climate Change secretariat. These submissions are made in accordance with the reporting requirements adopted under the Convention, such as The UNFCCC Reporting Guidelines on Annex I Inventories (document FCCC/SBSTA/2004/8) for Annex I Parties and Guidelines for the preparation of national communications for non-Annex I Parites (decision 17/CP.8). The inventory data are provided in the annual GHG inventory submissions by Annex I Parties and in the national communications under the Convention by non-Annex I Parties. The GHG data reported by Parties contain estimates for direct greenhouse gases, such as: CO2 - Carbon dioxide CH4 - Methane N2O - Nitrous oxide PFCs - Perfluorocarbons HFCs - Hydrofluorocarbons SF6 - Sulphur hexafluoride as well as for the indirect greenhouse gases such as SO2, NOx, CO and NMVOC.
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 October, 2016
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      This dataset presents trends in man-made emissions of major greenhouse gases and emissions by gas. Data refer to total emissions of CO2 (emissions from energy use and industrial processes, e.g. cement production), CH4 (methane emissions from solid waste, livestock, mining of hard coal and lignite, rice paddies, agriculture and leaks from natural gas pipelines), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). When interpreting these data it should be kept in mind that they refer to gross direct emissions excluding emissions or removals from land-use change and forestry (LULUCF). This dataset presents trends in man-made emissions of major greenhouse gases and emissions by gas. Data refer to total emissions of CO2 (emissions from energy use and industrial processes, e.g. cement production), CH4 (methane emissions from solid waste, livestock, mining of hard coal and lignite, rice paddies, agriculture and leaks from natural gas pipelines), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). When interpreting these data it should be kept in mind that they refer to gross direct emissions excluding emissions or removals from land-use change and forestry (LULUCF).
    • September 2014
      Source: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 September, 2014
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      Note 1: The reporting and review requirements for GHG inventories are different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. The definition format of data for emissions/removals from the forestry sector is different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. Note 2: Base year data in the data interface relate to the base year under the Climate Change Convention (UNFCCC). The base year under the Convention is defined slightly different than the base year under the Kyoto Protocol. An exception is made for European Union (15) whereby the base year under the Kyoto Protocol is displayed.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 June, 2016
      Select Dataset
      As a consequence of the implementation of the new OECD Global Insurance Statistics' framework, there is a break in series between 2008 and 2009 regarding life and non-life business data where composite insurance undertakings exist. Up until 2008, the insurance business is broken down between life and non-life business. As of 2009, the insurance business is broken down between the business of pure life, pure non-life and composite undertakings and composite undertakings' business is further broken down between life and non-life business. Some countries do not allow for insurance undertakings to be active in both life and non-life insurance business and therefore composite insurance undertakings do not exist in these countries. In other countries (e.g., Austria, Belgium, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Spain) however, the share of employment in composite insurance undertakings accounts for more than half of the whole domestic insurance sector. Therefore, to have comparable data across years for life business data (resp. non-life), one has to sum up the life (resp. non-life) business of pure life (resp. non-life) undertakings and the life (resp. non-life) business of composite undertakings as of 2009. Gross claims payments in the reporting country, containing a breakdown between domestic companies, foreign-controlled companies and branches and agencies of foreign companies.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 July, 2016
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      This table contains research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics on gross domestic R&D expenditure by sector of performance (business enterprise, government, higher education, private non-profit, and total intramural) and by field of science (natural sciences, engineering, medical sciences, agricultural sciences, social sciences, and humanities). Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2010 prices and PPPs).
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 April, 2016
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      Unit of measure used Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents data on Gross domestic expenditure on R&D (GERD) by socio-economic objective (SEO), using the NABS 2007 classification i.e.: Exploration and exploitation of the Earth, Environment, Exploration and exploitation of space, Transport, telecommunication and other infrastructures, Energy, Industrial production and technology, Health, Agriculture, Education, Culture, recreation, religion and mass media, Political and social systems, structures and processes, General advancement of knowledge, and Defence. Please note that in this new NABS 2007 classification, the three socio-economic objectives -- Education, Culture, recreation, religion and mass media, and Political and social systems, structures and processes -- were previously grouped under a single objective: Social structures and relationships. At the time of this publication there is no breakdown of historical data into the three new SEOs. Another issue relating to the transition from NABS 1993 to NABS 2007 is that what was formerly Other civil research is now to be distributed among the other chapters. This distribution has not yet been done in this database. Therefore, until the countries are in a position to provide breakdown according to the NABS 2007 classification, in some cases GERD by SEO is greater than the sum of its chapters.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 June, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table contains research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics. Data include gross domestic R&D expenditure by sector of performance (business enterprise, government, higher education, private non-profit, and total intramural) and by source of funds (business enterprise, government - including public general university funds -, higher education, private non-profit and funds from abroad - including funds from enterprises and other funds from abroad).
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics. Data include gross domestic R&D expenditure by sector of performance (business enterprise, government, higher education, private non-profit, and total intramural) and by type of costs (current expenditures: labour costs, other current costs; and capital expenditures: land and buildings, and instruments and equipment).
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 November, 2016
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      It presents the three approaches of the GDP: expenditure based, output based and income based. It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to annual national accounts questionnaire. This questionnaire is designed to collect internationally comparable data according to the 1993 SNA.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 June, 2016
      Select Dataset
      As a consequence of the implementation of the new OECD Global Insurance Statistics' framework, there is a break in series between 2008 and 2009 regarding life and non-life business data where composite insurance undertakings exist. Up until 2008, the insurance business is broken down between life and non-life business. As of 2009, the insurance business is broken down between the business of pure life, pure non-life and composite undertakings and composite undertakings' business is further broken down between life and non-life business. Some countries do not allow for insurance undertakings to be active in both life and non-life insurance business and therefore composite insurance undertakings do not exist in these countries. In other countries (e.g., Austria, Belgium, Hungary, Italy, Mexico, Portugal, Spain) however, the share of employment in composite insurance undertakings accounts for more than half of the whole domestic insurance sector. Therefore, to have comparable data across years for life business data (resp. non-life), one has to sum up the life (resp. non-life) business of pure life (resp. non-life) undertakings and the life (resp. non-life) business of composite undertakings as of 2009. This part contains gross operating expenses in the reporting country, with a breakdown between domestic companies, foreign-controlled companies and branches and agencies of foreign companies.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 September, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The maritime transport domain contains quarterly and annual data. Maritime transport data refer to gross weight of goods (in tonnes), passenger movements (in number of passengers) as well as for vessel traffic (in number of vessels and in gross tonnage of vessels). Data for transport of goods transported on Ro-Ro units or in containers are also expressed in number of units or number of TEUs (20 foot equivalent units). Data at regional level (NUTS 2, 1 and 0) are also available. The statistics on maritime transport are collected within Directive 2009/42/EC and Commission Decision 2008/861/EC, as amended by Commission Decision 2010/216/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2010, by Regulation 1090/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 and by Commission Delegated Decision 2012/186/EU of 3 February 2012. Data are collected by the national competent authorities in the reporting countries using a variety of data sources, such as port administration systems, national maritime databases, customs databases or questionnaires to ports or shipping agents (see section 20.1). The maritime transport data have been calculated using data collected at port level. The data are displayed at port level, regional level, Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level and country level. The data are presented in six collections, displaying main annual results, short sea shipping, passengers, goods vessel traffic and regional statistics.
    • March 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 October, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The maritime transport domain contains quarterly and annual data. Maritime transport data refer to gross weight of goods (in tonnes), passenger movements (in number of passengers) as well as for vessel traffic (in number of vessels and in gross tonnage of vessels). Data for transport of goods transported on Ro-Ro units or in containers are also expressed in number of units or number of TEUs (20 foot equivalent units). Data at regional level (NUTS 2, 1 and 0) are also available. The statistics on maritime transport are collected within Directive 2009/42/EC and Commission Decision 2008/861/EC, as amended by Commission Decision 2010/216/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2010, by Regulation 1090/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 and by Commission Delegated Decision 2012/186/EU of 3 February 2012. Data are collected by the national competent authorities in the reporting countries using a variety of data sources, such as port administration systems, national maritime databases, customs databases or questionnaires to ports or shipping agents (see section 18.1). The maritime transport data have been calculated using data collected at port level. The data are displayed at port level, regional level, Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level and country level. The data are presented in six collections, displaying main annual results, short sea shipping, passengers, goods vessel traffic and regional statistics.
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The maritime transport domain contains quarterly and annual data. Maritime transport data refer to gross weight of goods (in tonnes), passenger movements (in number of passengers) as well as for vessel traffic (in number of vessels and in gross tonnage of vessels). Data for transport of goods transported on Ro-Ro units or in containers are also expressed in number of units or number of TEUs (20 foot equivalent units). Data at regional level (NUTS 2, 1 and 0) are also available. The statistics on maritime transport are collected within Directive 2009/42/EC and Commission Decision 2008/861/EC, as amended by Commission Decision 2010/216/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2010, by Regulation 1090/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 and by Commission Delegated Decision 2012/186/EU of 3 February 2012. Data are collected by the national competent authorities in the reporting countries using a variety of data sources, such as port administration systems, national maritime databases, customs databases or questionnaires to ports or shipping agents (see section 18.1). The maritime transport data have been calculated using data collected at port level. The data are displayed at port level, regional level, Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level and country level. The data are presented in six collections, displaying main annual results, short sea shipping, passengers, goods vessel traffic and regional statistics.
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The maritime transport domain contains quarterly and annual data. Maritime transport data refer to gross weight of goods (in tonnes), passenger movements (in number of passengers) as well as for vessel traffic (in number of vessels and in gross tonnage of vessels). Data for transport of goods transported on Ro-Ro units or in containers are also expressed in number of units or number of TEUs (20 foot equivalent units). Data at regional level (NUTS 2, 1 and 0) are also available. The statistics on maritime transport are collected within Directive 2009/42/EC and Commission Decision 2008/861/EC, as amended by Commission Decision 2010/216/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2010, by Regulation 1090/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 and by Commission Delegated Decision 2012/186/EU of 3 February 2012. Data are collected by the national competent authorities in the reporting countries using a variety of data sources, such as port administration systems, national maritime databases, customs databases or questionnaires to ports or shipping agents (see section 20.1). The maritime transport data have been calculated using data collected at port level. The data are displayed at port level, regional level, Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level and country level. The data are presented in six collections, displaying main annual results, short sea shipping, passengers, goods vessel traffic and regional statistics.
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 September, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The maritime transport domain contains quarterly and annual data. Maritime transport data refer to gross weight of goods (in tonnes), passenger movements (in number of passengers) as well as for vessel traffic (in number of vessels and in gross tonnage of vessels). Data for transport of goods transported on Ro-Ro units or in containers are also expressed in number of units or number of TEUs (20 foot equivalent units). Data at regional level (NUTS 2, 1 and 0) are also available. The statistics on maritime transport are collected within Directive 2009/42/EC and Commission Decision 2008/861/EC, as amended by Commission Decision 2010/216/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2010, by Regulation 1090/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 and by Commission Delegated Decision 2012/186/EU of 3 February 2012. Data are collected by the national competent authorities in the reporting countries using a variety of data sources, such as port administration systems, national maritime databases, customs databases or questionnaires to ports or shipping agents (see section 18.1). The maritime transport data have been calculated using data collected at port level. The data are displayed at port level, regional level, Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level and country level. The data are presented in six collections, displaying main annual results, short sea shipping, passengers, goods vessel traffic and regional statistics.
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 September, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The maritime transport domain contains quarterly and annual data. Maritime transport data refer to gross weight of goods (in tonnes), passenger movements (in number of passengers) as well as for vessel traffic (in number of vessels and in gross tonnage of vessels). Data for transport of goods transported on Ro-Ro units or in containers are also expressed in number of units or number of TEUs (20 foot equivalent units). Data at regional level (NUTS 2, 1 and 0) are also available. The statistics on maritime transport are collected within Directive 2009/42/EC and Commission Decision 2008/861/EC, as amended by Commission Decision 2010/216/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2010, by Regulation 1090/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 and by Commission Delegated Decision 2012/186/EU of 3 February 2012. Data are collected by the national competent authorities in the reporting countries using a variety of data sources, such as port administration systems, national maritime databases, customs databases or questionnaires to ports or shipping agents (see section 20.1). The maritime transport data have been calculated using data collected at port level. The data are displayed at port level, regional level, Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level and country level. The data are presented in six collections, displaying main annual results, short sea shipping, passengers, goods vessel traffic and regional statistics.
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The maritime transport domain contains quarterly and annual data. Maritime transport data refer to gross weight of goods (in tonnes), passenger movements (in number of passengers) as well as for vessel traffic (in number of vessels and in gross tonnage of vessels). Data for transport of goods transported on Ro-Ro units or in containers are also expressed in number of units or number of TEUs (20 foot equivalent units). Data at regional level (NUTS 2, 1 and 0) are also available. The statistics on maritime transport are collected within Directive 2009/42/EC and Commission Decision 2008/861/EC, as amended by Commission Decision 2010/216/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2010, by Regulation 1090/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 and by Commission Delegated Decision 2012/186/EU of 3 February 2012. Data are collected by the national competent authorities in the reporting countries using a variety of data sources, such as port administration systems, national maritime databases, customs databases or questionnaires to ports or shipping agents (see section 20.1). The maritime transport data have been calculated using data collected at port level. The data are displayed at port level, regional level, Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level and country level. The data are presented in six collections, displaying main annual results, short sea shipping, passengers, goods vessel traffic and regional statistics.
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The maritime transport domain contains quarterly and annual data. Maritime transport data refer to gross weight of goods (in tonnes), passenger movements (in number of passengers) as well as for vessel traffic (in number of vessels and in gross tonnage of vessels). Data for transport of goods transported on Ro-Ro units or in containers are also expressed in number of units or number of TEUs (20 foot equivalent units). Data at regional level (NUTS 2, 1 and 0) are also available. The statistics on maritime transport are collected within Directive 2009/42/EC and Commission Decision 2008/861/EC, as amended by Commission Decision 2010/216/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2010, by Regulation 1090/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 November 2010 and by Commission Delegated Decision 2012/186/EU of 3 February 2012. Data are collected by the national competent authorities in the reporting countries using a variety of data sources, such as port administration systems, national maritime databases, customs databases or questionnaires to ports or shipping agents (see section 18.1). The maritime transport data have been calculated using data collected at port level. The data are displayed at port level, regional level, Maritime Coastal Area (MCA) level and country level. The data are presented in six collections, displaying main annual results, short sea shipping, passengers, goods vessel traffic and regional statistics.
    • November 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The OECD Productivity Database aims at providing users with the most comprehensive and the latest productivity estimates. The update cycle is on a rolling basis, i.e. each variable in the dataset is made publicly available as soon as it is updated in the sources databases. However, some time lag may arise which affects individual series and/or individual countries for two reasons: First, hours worked data from the OECD Employment Outlook are typically updated less frequently than the OECD Annual National Accounts Database. Second, source data for capital services are typically available in annual national accounts with a lag. Labour productivity is a key driver of economic growth and changes in living standards, as measured notably by growth in GDP per capita. Labour productivity growth means a higher level of output for every hour worked. This can be achieved if more capital is used in production or through improved overall efficiency with which labour and capital are used together, i.e., higher multifactor productivity growth (MFP). Labour productivity is also a key driver of international competitiveness, e.g. as measured by Unit Labour Costs (ULC).
  • H
    • November 2016
      Source: Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism, State of Hawaii
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Heads of Universities by sex, 2016
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha_hf Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.3.2. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha_hc Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.3.2. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha_hp Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.3.2. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.
    • May 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2015
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:hlth_sha_ltc Data descriptionHealth care expenditure data provide information on expenditure in the functionally defined area of health distinct by provider category (e.g. hospitals, general practitioners), function category (e.g. services of curative care, rehabilitative care, clinical laboratory, patient transport, prescribed medicines) and financing agent (e.g. social security, private insurance company, household).The definitions and classifications of the System of Health Accounts (SHA) (see the annex at the bottom of the page) are followed, e.g. International Classification for Health Accounts - Providers of health care (ICHA-HP).Health care data on expenditure are largely based on surveys and administrative (register) data sources in the countries. Therefore, they reflect the country-specific way of organising health care and may not always be completely comparable.The database is based on a co-operation between EUROSTAT, the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development) and the WHO (World Health Organisation), executing a Joint Questionnaire on Health expenditure since 2005.The area covered consists of EU-27 (excluding EL, IE, IT, MT, and UK), Norway, Iceland, Switzerland, Japan, USA, Australia and Korea.3.2. Classification systemFor all data on expenditure two sources for classifications are available:the System of Health Accounts (Manual v.1.0) as presented by the OECD in 2000 andthe Guide to producing national health accounts with special application for low and middle income countries produced by WHO/Worldbank/USAID in 2003These two manuals are complemented by the Guidelines produced for EUROSTAT by the Office for National Statistics (UK) in 2003.
    • December 2014
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 January, 2015
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      Over the past decade or more, there have been several efforts to find out which are the world’s best-performing healthcare systems. The pioneer was the World Health Organisation (WHO), which used its annual World Health Report in 2000 to perform a systematic global analysis. The work that The Economist Intelligence Unit has previously carried out in the area of value-based healthcare has made it clear that value is a vexed term
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 November, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • November 2013
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 December, 2013
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      OECD Health Data 2013 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.B1:B4
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • October 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • June 2010
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      OECD Health Data 2010 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • December 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 December, 2016
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      The World Bank Health Nutrition and Population Statistics Provides key health, nutrition and population statistics gathered from a variety of international sources. Themes include population dynamics, nutrition, reproductive health, health financing, medical resources and usage, immunization, infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS, DALY, population projections and lending. HNPStats also includes health, nutrition and population statistics by wealth quintiles.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: ClinicalTrials.gov
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
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      ClinicalTrials.gov currently lists 233,365 studies with locations in all 50 States and in 195 countries. As of October 2015, ClinicalTrials.gov receives an average of more than 207 million page views per month and 65,000 unique visitors daily.
    • September 2015
      Source: World Organisation for Animal Health
      Uploaded by: Kirill Kosenkov
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2015
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      The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) data on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Animals (HPAI, informally known as bird flu). Number of outbreaks, total susceptible animals & animals destroyed and other stats by country.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      'Statistics on high-tech industry and knowledge-intensive services' (sometimes referred to as simply 'high-tech statistics') comprise economic, employment and science, technology and innovation (STI) data describing manufacturing and services industries or products traded broken down by technological intensity. The domain uses various other domains and sources of  Eurostat's official statistics (CIS, COMEXT, HRST, LFS, PATENT, R&D and SBS) and its coverage is therefore dependent on these other primary sources. Two main approaches are used in the domain to identify technology-intensity: the sectoral approach and the product approach. A third approach is used for data on high-tech and biotechnology patents aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC) 8th edition (see summary table in Annex 1 for which approach is used by each type of data). The sectoral approach: The sectoral approach is an aggregation of the manufacturing industries according to technological intensity (R&D expenditure/value added) and based on the Statistical classification of economic activities in the European Community (NACE)  at 2-digit level. The level of R&D intensity served as a criterion of classification of economic sectors into high-technology, medium high-technology, medium low-technology and low-technology industries. Services are mainly aggregated into knowledge-intensive services (KIS) and less knowledge-intensive services (LKIS) based on the share of tertiary educated persons at NACE 2-digit level. The sectoral approach is used for all indicators except data on high-tech trade and patents. Note that due to the revision of the NACE from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the definition of high-technology industries and knowledge-intensive services has changed in 2008. For high-tech statistics it means that two different definitions (one according NACE Rev. 1.1 and one according NACE Rev. 2) are used in parallel and the data according to both NACE versions are presented in separated tables depending on the data availability. For example as the LFS provides the results both by NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2, all the table using this source have been duplicated to present the results by NACE Rev. 2 from 2008. For more details, see both definitions of high-tech sectors under Annexes section. Within the sectoral approach, a second classification was created , named Knowledge Intensive Activities KIA) and based on the share of tertiary educated people in each sectors of industries and services according to NACE at 2-digit level and for all EU28 Member States. A threshold was applied to judge sectors as knowledge intensive. In contrast to first sectoral approach mixing two methodologies, one for manufacturing industries and one for services, the KIA classification is based on one methodology for all the sectors of industries and services covering even public sector activities. The aggregations in use are Total Knowledge Intensive Activities (KIA) and Knowledge Intensive Activities in Business Industries (KIABI). Both classifications are made according to NACE Rev. 1.1 and NACE Rev. 2 at 2- digit level. Note that due to revision of the NACE Rev.1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 the list of Knowledge Intensive Activities has changed as well, the two definitions are used in parallel and the data are shown in two separate tables. NACE Rev.2 collection includes data starting from 2008 reference year. For more details please see the definitions under Annexes section. The product approach: The product approach was created to complement the sectoral approach and it is used for data on high-tech trade. The product list is based on the calculations of R&D intensity by groups of products (R&D expenditure/total sales). The groups classified as high-technology products are aggregated on the basis of the Standard International Trade Classification (SITC). The initial definition was built based on SITC Rev.3 and served to compile the high-tech product aggregates until 2007. With the implementation in 2007 of the new version of SITC Rev.4, the definition of high-tech groups was revised and adapted according to new classification. Starting from 2007 the Eurostat presents the trade data for high-tech groups aggregated based on the SITC Rev.4. . For more details, see definition of high-tech products under Annexes section. High-tech patents: High-tech patents are defined according to another approach. The groups classified as high-tech patents are aggregated on the basis of the International Patent Classification (IPC 8th edition). Biotechnology patents are also aggregated on the basis of the IPC 8th edition. For more details, see the aggregation list of high-tech and biotechnology patents under Annexes section. The high-tech domain also comprises the sub-domain Venture Capital Investments: data are provided by INVEST Europe (formerly named the European Private Equity and Venture Capital Association EVCA). More details are available in the Eurostat metadata under Venture capital investments. Please note that for paragraphs where no metadata for regional data has been specified, the regional metadata is identical to the metadata provided for the national data.