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China

  • President:Xi Jinping
  • Premier:Li Keqiang
  • Capital city:Beijing
  • Languages:Standard Chinese or Mandarin (official; Putonghua, based on the Beijing dialect), Yue (Cantonese), Wu (Shanghainese), Minbei (Fuzhou), Minnan (Hokkien-Taiwanese), Xiang, Gan, Hakka dialects, minority languages (see Ethnic groups entry) note: Zhuang is official in Guangxi Zhuang, Yue is official in Guangdong, Mongolian is official in Nei Mongol, Uighur is official in Xinjiang Uygur, Kyrgyz is official in Xinjiang Uygur, and Tibetan is official in Xizang (Tibet)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population:1,371,220,000 (2015)
  • Area:9,388,211 (2015)
  • GDP per capita:7,925 (2015)
  • GDP, current US$:10,866.4 (2015)
  • GINI index:42.16 (2012)
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:84 (2015)
All datasets:  3 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W
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  • A
  • B
    • January 2017
      Source: Baker Hughes
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 January, 2017
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    • September 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 January, 2017
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      The balance of payments is a statistical statement that provides a systematic summary of economic transactions of an economy with the rest of the world, for a specific time period. The transactions are for the most part between residents and non-residents of the economy. A transaction is defined as an economic flow that reflects the creation, transformation, exchange, transfer, or extinction of economic value and involves changes in ownership, of goods or assets, the provision of services, labour or capital. For countries compiling Balance of Payments Statistics in accordance with the 6th edition of the Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual published by the IMF (BPM6) as indicated in metadata at the country level, transactions include: the goods and services accounts, the primary income account (income account in BPM5), the secondary income account (transfers in BPM5), the capital account, and the financial account.                                                                                                                   For countries compiling Balance of Payments statistics in accordance with the 5th edition on the Balance of Payments Manual, transactions include: goods, services, and income; those involving financial claims on and liabilities to the rest of the world; and transfers.                                                                       Changes in BPM6 compared to BPM5 are often a consequence of a stricter application of the change of ownership principle in particular in the goods and services accounts. They relate to transactions on goods and services (merchanting, goods for processing, Insurance), income (investment income), and financial operations (direct investment). Seasonal adjustment - Where the seasonal adjustment has been carried out by the OECD, the X-12 Reg-ARIMA method is used.
    • July 2016
      Source: Central Bank of Sao Tome and Principe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 August, 2016
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      Balance of Payments of Sao Tome & Principe, 2013
    • June 2015
      Source: Barro-Lee
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 October, 2015
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    • August 2015
      Source: Barro-Lee
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 October, 2015
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    • December 2012
      Source: PoachingFacts.com
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 June, 2016
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    • January 2016
      Source: Bertelsmann Stiftung
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2016
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      The Bertelsmann Stiftung’s Transformation Index (BTI) analyzes and evaluates the quality of democracy, a market economy and political management in 128 developing and transition countries. It measures successes and setbacks on the path toward a democracy based on the rule of law and a market economy flanked by sociopolitical safeguards. Within this framework, the BTI publishes two rankings, the Status Index and the Management Index. Countries are further categorized on the basis of these status index and management rankings/scores. For instance, countries are categorized in to 5 groups – viz; 5 or failed, 4 or very limited, 3 or limited, 2 or advanced, and 1 or highly advanced—based on their status index score of 1 to 10. A country with a high score, 8.5 and above, is categorized as highly advanced. A country with a low score, below 4, is categorized as failed. A country is categorized as ‘very limited’ if it has a status index score between 4 and 5.5. A score between 5.5 and 7 means the country is categorized as ‘limited’ and a country is categorized as ‘advanced’ for a score between 7.1 and 8.5.On the basis of the democratic status ranking, countries are further categorized as 5 or ‘hard - line autocracies,’ 4 or ‘moderate autocracies,’ 3 or ‘highly defective democracies,’ 2 or ‘defective democracies,’ and 1 or ‘democracies in consolidation.’ A country with a democratic status ranking below 4 is categorized as a hard line autocracy. A democratic status score between 4 and 5 means that the country is part of the ‘moderate autocracy’ group. A country is grouped as a ‘highly defective democracy’ for a score between 5 and 6. A country is recognized as a ‘defective democracy’ for a score between 6 and 8, and a score of 8 and above earns a country the status of a ‘democracy in consolidation.’Countries are also categorized in to 5 groups based on their market economy status ranking. The countries are categorized as ‘rudimentary’ or group 5, ‘poorly functioning’ or group 4, ‘functional flaws’ or group 3, ‘functioning’ or group 2, and ‘developed’ or group 1. A country is recognized as a member of the ‘developed’ group with a market economy status ranking/score of 8 and above. A country is grouped as ‘functioning’ if it has a score between 7 and 8. A market economy status ranking between 5 and 7 means the country is categorized to group 3 or the ‘functional flaws’ group. A score between 3 and 5 means that the country is ‘poorly functioning’ and a score below 3 means the country enjoys a ‘rudimentary’ status.Based on the management index ranking, countries are categorized as 5 or failed, 4 or weak, 3 or moderate, 2 or good, and1 or very good. A country is categorized as ‘very good’ for a score of 7 and above. It is categorized as ‘good’ for a score between 5.6 and 7, and as ‘moderate’ for a score between 4.4 and 5.5. A score between 3 and 4.3 means a country is categorized as ‘weak,’ and a score below 3 means the categorization of a country as ‘failed.’Countries are ranked between 1 and 10 on the basis of the level of difficulty they face. The level of difficulty is further categorized as 5 or negligible, 4 or minor, 3 or moderate, 2 or substantial, and 1 or massive. A score of 8.5 and above means the categorization of the country’s level of difficulty as ‘massive, and a score below 2.5 means the categorization of the level of difficulty faced by the country as ‘negligible.’ The level of difficulty score of 2.5 to 4.4 means a country faces a ‘minor’ level of difficulty and a score between 4.5 and 6.4 means the level of difficulty faced by a country is ‘moderate.’ A country with a score of 6.5 to 8.4 faces a ‘substantial’ level of difficulty.
    • December 2014
      Source: Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 December, 2015
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    • April 2014
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 February, 2016
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      UNCTAD's Bilateral FDI Statistics provides up-to-date and systematic FDI data for 206 economies around the world, covering inflows (table 1), outflows (table 2), inward stock (table 3) and outward stock (table 4) by region and economy. Data are in principle collected from national sources. In order to cover the entire world, where data are not available from national sources, data from partner countries (mirror data) as well as from other international organizations have also been used.
    • October 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2016
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      This data set provides a snapshot of migration and remittances for all countries, regions and income groups of the world, compiled from available data from various sources
    • January 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 May, 2016
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      Below Parameters are common for all combinations : Frequency - Quarterly Measure - Amounts Outstanding / Stocks CBS Bank Type - Domestic Banks CBS Reporting Basis - Immediate Counterparty Basis Balance Sheet Position - Total Claims Type of Instruments - All Instruments Remaining Maturity - All Maturities Currency Type of Booking Location - All Currencies Counterparty Sector - All Sectors
    • December 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
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    • January 2017
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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    • November 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
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      The residential property price statistics collect data from different countries. The BIS has obtained permission from various national data providers, with the assistance of its member central banks, to disseminate these statistics. The topic ‘Property prices: Selected series,’ contains nominal and real quarterly values for 58 countries, both in levels and in growth rates (ie four series per country). Real series are the nominal price series deflated by the consumer price index. The BIS has made the selection based on the Handbook on Residential Property Prices and the experience and metadata of central banks.
    • January 2016
      Source: Bloomberg
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 May, 2016
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      Methodology:R&D intensity: Research and development expenditure, as % GDP.Manufacturing value-added: MVA, as GDP and per capita.Productivity: GDP per employed person age 15-F and 3V improvement.High-tech density: Number of domestically domiciled high-tech public companies — such as aerospace and defense, biotechnology, hardware, software, semiconductors, Internet software and services, and renewable energy companies — as % of domestic publicly listed companies and as a share of world's total public high-tech companies.Tertiary efficiency: Tertiary efficiency: Total enrollment in tertiary education, regardless of age, as % the post-secondary cohort; % labor force with tertiary degrees; annual new science and engineering graduates as % total tertiary graduates and as % of the labor force.Researcher concentration: Professionals, including postgraduate Ph.D, students, engaged in R&D per million population.Patent activity: Resident patent filings per million population and per $100 billion GDP; Patent grants as a snare of world total. All metrics are equally weighted. Metrics consisting of multiple factors were rescaled for countries void of some but not all data points, All sub-metrics were weighted equally. Most recent data available were used. Of the more than 200 economies evaluated, 84 had data available for at least six of the seven factors, and were ranked. Top 50 and the metric ranks among them are displayed,Sources: Bloomberg, International Monetary Fund, World sank, Organization for EconomicCooperation and Development. World Intellectual Property Organization, United Nations
    • February 2016
      Source: BP
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 February, 2016
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      BP Energy outlook to 2035, indices of consumption and production of different energy sources
    • June 2016
      Source: BP
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 June, 2016
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      The BP Statistical Review of World Energy has provided high-quality, objective and globally consistent data on world energy markets. The Review is one of the most widely respected and authoritative publications in the field of energy economics, used for reference by the media, academia, world governments and energy companies. A new edition is published every June. Historical data from 1965 for many sections.
    • June 2016
      Source: BP
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 June, 2016
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      The BP Statistical Review of World Energy has provided high-quality, objective and globally consistent data on world energy markets. The Review is one of the most widely respected and authoritative publications in the fi eld of energy economics, used for reference by the media, academia, world governments and energy companies. A new edition is published every June. Historical data from 1965 for many sections.
    • June 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 March, 2016
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      The OECD broadband portal provides access to a range of broadband-related statistics gathered by the OECD. Policy makers must examine a range of indicators which reflect the status of individual broadband markets. The OECD broadband speed tests by country show the official measurements of actual access network broadband speed. The OECD broadband map shows national broadband statistics in OECD countries. Mobile broadband penetration has risen to 85.4% in the OECD area, meaning more than four wireless subscriptions for every five inhabitants, according to data for June 2015 released by the OECD . Note: unit of measure of indicators related to Internet selling and purchasing by industry is percentage of businesses with 10 or more employees in each industry group.
    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 May, 2016
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    • April 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 August, 2015
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics performed in the business enterprise sector by industry according to the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) revision 3.1. Data at the industry level are presented beginning 1987, year when most of the countries converted from ISIC rev.2 to the current ISIC rev. 3 classification. This breakdown between industries is, in principle, made at the enterprise level, although some countries are able to break down R&D data for multi product enterprises between their main lines of business. National statistical regulations prevent publication of results where there are very few firms in the given category, hence the many gaps in the tables. Depending on the country, R&D institutes serving enterprises are either classified with the industry concerned, or grouped under “Research and Development” (ISIC rev.3.1, Division 73). When these R&D institutes are classified with the industry served, the evaluation of R&D in these industries is more complete and more comparable between countries for the industries concerned. This results, however, in an underestimation of the percentage of BERD performed by the service sector as compared with other countries. The Frascati Manual recommendation concerning data on R&D by industry is to report BERD on an enterprise basis (see FM section 3.4). When this is interpreted strictly, all the BERD of a diversified enterprise will be allocated to the industrial class of its principal activity. In circumstances where a few large firms dominate R&D spending in several areas, this can and does lead to underestimates of R&D associated with the secondary activities of the firms. Overall, R&D is therefore overestimated for some industries and underestimated for others. However, not all countries follow a strict enterprise basis for allocating R&D expenditures to industrial classes. Some countries make a disaggregation of the R&D of their largest, diversified firms into a number of different activities. In other countries, the enterprise approach has been abandoned and data are reported on a product field basis. This is why two classification criteria for BERD by industry are included in this view of “BERD by industry” (see the variable CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA: Main activity or Product field) depending on which approach is more closely followed by each country (only a few countries currently collect these data both ways and are therefore included according to both criteria)). The two tables that follow, “BERD by industry and source of funds” and “BERD by industry and type of costs” present data for only one of the criteria, depending on the country.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics performed in the business enterprise sector by industry according to the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) revision 3.1. and by source of funds (business enterprise, government, other national funds, and funds from abroad). Data at the industry level are presented beginning 1987, year when most of the countries converted from ISIC rev.2 to the current ISIC rev. 3 classification. This breakdown between industries is, in principle, made at the enterprise level, although some countries are able to break down R&D data for multi product enterprises between their main lines of business. National statistical regulations prevent publication of results where there are very few firms in the given category, hence the many gaps in the tables. Depending on the country, R&D institutes serving enterprises are either classified with the industry concerned, or grouped under “Research and Development” (ISIC rev.3.1, Division 73). When these R&D institutes are classified with the industry served, the evaluation of R&D in these industries is more complete and more comparable between countries for the industries concerned. This results, however, in an underestimation of the percentage of BERD performed by the service sector as compared with other countries. The Frascati Manual recommendation concerning data on R&D by industry is to report BERD on an enterprise basis (see FM section 3.4). When this is interpreted strictly, all the BERD of a diversified enterprise will be allocated to the industrial class of its principal activity. In circumstances where a few large firms dominate R&D spending in several areas, this can and does lead to underestimates of R&D associated with the secondary activities of the firms. Overall, R&D is therefore overestimated for some industries and underestimated for others. However, not all countries follow a strict enterprise basis for allocating R&D expenditures to industrial classes. Some countries make a disaggregation of the R&D of their largest, diversified firms into a number of different activities. In other countries, the enterprise approach has been abandoned and data are reported on a product field basis. This is why two classification criteria for BERD by industry are included in the table “BERD by industry” (see the variable CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA: Main activity or Product field) depending on which approach is more closely followed by each country (only a few countries currently collect these data both ways and are therefore included according to both criteria). However, this table “BERD by industry and source of funds” and the one that follows, “BERD by industry and type of costs” present data for only one of the criteria, depending on the country.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2000 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics performed in the business enterprise sector by industry according to the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) revision 3.1. and by type of costs (current expenditure, capital expenditure). Data at the industry level are presented beginning 1987, year when most of the countries converted from ISIC rev.2 to the current ISIC rev. 3 classification. This breakdown between industries is, in principle, made at the enterprise level, although some countries are able to break down R&D data for multi product enterprises between their main lines of business. National statistical regulations prevent publication of results where there are very few firms in the given category, hence the many gaps in the tables. Depending on the country, R&D institutes serving enterprises are either classified with the industry concerned, or grouped under “Research and Development” (ISIC rev.3.1, Division 73). When these R&D institutes are classified with the industry served, the evaluation of R&D in these industries is more complete and more comparable between countries for the industries concerned. This results, however, in an underestimation of the percentage of BERD performed by the service sector as compared with other countries. The Frascati Manual recommendation concerning data on R&D by industry is to report BERD on an enterprise basis (see FM section 3.4). When this is interpreted strictly, all the BERD of a diversified enterprise will be allocated to the industrial class of its principal activity. In circumstances where a few large firms dominate R&D spending in several areas, this can and does lead to underestimates of R&D associated with the secondary activities of the firms. Overall, R&D is therefore overestimated for some industries and underestimated for others. However, not all countries follow a strict enterprise basis for allocating R&D expenditures to industrial classes. Some countries make a disaggregation of the R&D of their largest, diversified firms into a number of different activities. In other countries, the enterprise approach has been abandoned and data are reported on a product field basis. This is why two classification criteria for BERD by industry are included in the table “BERD by industry” (see the variable CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA: Main activity or Product field) depending on which approach is more closely followed by each country (only a few countries currently collect these data both ways and are therefore included according to both criteria). However, this table “BERD by industry and type of costs” and the preceding one “BERD by industry and source of funds” present data for only one of the criteria, depending on the country.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 May, 2016
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      This table presents research and development (R&D) statistics on personnel in the business enterprise sector. Measured in full-time equivalent are the number of total R&D personnel and researchers in the business enterprise sector by industry according to the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) revision 3.1. Data at the industry level are presented beginning 1987, year when most of the countries converted from ISIC rev.2 to the current ISIC rev. 3 classification.
    • June 2014
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 January, 2015
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      The business rankings model measures the quality or attractiveness of the business environment in the 82 countries covered by The Economist Intelligence Unit’s Country Forecast reports. It is designed to reflect the main criteria used by companies to formulate their global business strategies, and is based not only on historical conditions but also on expectations about conditions prevailing over the next five years. This allows the Economist Intelligence Unit to utilise the regularity, depth and detail of its forecasting work to generate a unique set of forward-looking business environment rankings on a regional and global basis.
    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 January, 2017
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      The business tendency survey indicators cover a standard set of indicators for four economic sectors: manufacturing, construction, retail trade and other services. This includes an indicator of overall business conditions or business confidence in each sector. The consumer opinion survey indicators cover a restricted set of indicators on consumer confidence, expected economic situation and price expectations.Business and consumer opinion (tendency) surveys provide qualitative information that has proved useful for monitoring the current economic situation. Typically they are based on a sample of enterprises or households and respondents are asked about their assessments of the current situation and expectations for the immediate future. For enterprise surveys this concerns topics such as production, orders, stocks etc. and in the case of consumer surveys their intentions concerning major purposes, economic situation now compared with the recent past and expectations for the immediate future. Many survey series provide advance warning of turning points in aggregate economic activity as measured by GDP or industrial production. Such series are known as leading indicators in cyclical analysis. These types of survey series are widely used as component series in composite leading indicators. The main characteristic of these types of surveys is that instead of asking for exact figures, they usually ask for the direction of change e.g. a question on tendency by reference to a “normal” state, e.g. of production level. Possible answers are generally of the three point scale type e.g. up/same/down or above normal/normal/below normal for enterprise surveys and of the five point scale type e.g. increase sharply/increase slightly/remain the same/fall slightly/fall sharply for consumer surveys. In presenting the results as a time series, only the balance is shown. That is “same” or “normal” answers are ignored and the balance is obtained by taking the difference between percentages of respondents giving favourable and unfavourable answers.Virtually all business tendency and consumer opinion survey data are presented as time series of balances in this dataset, either in raw or seasonally adjusted form. Very few series are presented as indices, and where these exist they have generally been converted from underlying balances by countries before submitting the data to the OECD.  
    • February 2012
      Source: Federal State Statistics Service, Russia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Внешняя торговля товарами Российской Федерации по странам партнерам, 1995-2011
  • C
    • December 2015
      Source: World Resources Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 February, 2016
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      CAIT Historic allows for easy access, analysis and visualization of the latest available international greenhouse gas emissions data. It includes information for 186 countries, 50 U.S. states, 6 gases, multiple economic sectors, and 160 years - carbon dioxide emissions for 1850-2012 and multi-sector greenhouse gas emission for 1990-2012.
    • October 2016
      Source: International Organization of Motor Vehicle Manufacturers
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2016
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      OICA Car Production Statistics 1999-2012 contains world motor vehicle production statistics, obtained from national trade organisations, OICA members or correspondents. Passenger cars are motor vehicles with at least four wheels, used for the transport of passengers, and comprising no more than eight seats in addition to the driver's seat. Commercial vehicles include light commercial vehicles, heavy trucks, coaches and buses.
    • August 2013
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2014
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      Transactions within the international production network and imports and exports of final goods and services can be estimated by using an inter-country economic model based on multi-regional input-output (MRIO) modelling techniques. In order to achieve this, national Input-Output tables are first converted to a common currency (nominal USD) and the import matrices are disaggregated to separate bilateral flows of goods and services. A range of adjustments to deal with measurement issues such as re-exports; unspecified partners and commodities; and missing data, particularly for trade in services, are necessary before the analysis.
    • January 2008
      Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      In summary, this database provides estimates of regional and global net carbon fluxes, on a year-by-year basis from 1850 through 2005, resulting from changes in land use (such as harvesting of forest products and clearing for agriculture), taking into account not only the initial removal and oxidation of the carbon in the vegetation, but also subsequent regrowth and changes in soil carbon. The net flux of carbon to the atmosphere from changes in land use from 1850 to 2005 was modeled as a function of documented land-use change and changes in aboveground and belowground carbon following changes in land use.
    • November 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 December, 2015
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      Catches of fish, crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic organisms by species and fishing area for EU and associated countries (in live weight equivalent of the landings).
    • November 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 September, 2016
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      Catches of fish, crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic organisms by species and fishing area for EU and associated countries (in live weight equivalent of the landings).
    • December 2013
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 January, 2014
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      Eurostat Dataset Id:fish_ca_00 Catches of fish, crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic organisms by species and fishing area for EU and associated countries (in live weight equivalent of the landings). The concepts and definitions used in the compilation of catch statistics are those laid down by the Coordinating Working Party on Fishery Statistics (CWP), of which Eurostat is one of the member organizations. These concepts and definitions have been in force since the late 1950's and are applied uniformly worldwide by the CWP and by the national authorities reporting to its member organizations. Therefore, though the quality of the data varies from country to country (being in many cases a function of the general characteristics of the national fishing industry), there is a high degree of comparability between countries and over time.  Nominal catch  The data refer to the catch of freshwater, brackish water and marine species of fish, crustaceans, molluscs and other aquatic animals and plants, killed, caught, trapped or collected for all commercial, industrial, recreational and subsistence purposes. In view of the importance of recreational fishing regarding some stocks and for certain countries, as well as the difficulty of distinguishing between recreational and subsistence fishing, the data should include the catches from recreational fisheries as well. However, it is recognised that certain countries are unable to supply the data for recreational fisheries. The catches are expressed in the live weight equivalent of the landings. As such they exclude all quantities caught but not landed (for example: discarded fish, fish consumed on board). The unit used is generally the metric ton. Data for marine mammals (e.g. whales) and certain other animals (e.g. crocodiles) are expressed in the number caught. The nominal catch data are normally derived from the landed quantities of the fishery products. For this purpose, the landed weight is converted to the live weight equivalent (nominal catch) by the application of factors. Species: All species for which catches are reported to international organizations are included in the Eurostat's database. They are identified by the internationally assigned three letter identifier (e.g. COD = Atlantic cod, PLE = European plaice) according to the FAO ASFIS (Aquatic Sciences and Fishery Information System) list of Species for Fishery Statistics Purposes. Fishing areas/regions: The catches are sub-divided by the area in which they occur. The methodologies vary from country to country depending on the nature of their fishing industries. Basic documentation used in collecting the data from EU fisheries are fishing log-books, landings declarations and sales notes used in the management of catch quota and market management systems within the Common Fisheries Policy. The methodologies used by EEA member countries have been described in the Eurostat publication "Fisheries: The collection and compilation of fish catch and landing statistics in member countries of the European Economic Area". Those used by the New Member States are described in a working document "Fisheries: The collection and compilation of fishery statistics in European Union Candidate Countries"
    • March 2016
      Source: German Chemicals Industry Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 April, 2016
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      Chemistry facts and figures 2015: Foreign Trade
    • March 2016
      Source: German Chemicals Industry Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 April, 2016
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      Chemistry facts and figures 2015: Investments
    • November 2016
      Source: National Bureau of Statistics, China
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 December, 2016
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      China Regional Dataset
    • November 2016
      Source: PK Thinker
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 November, 2016
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      Note:Data cited at,China Power Plants Investment by Region and Power Source 2007-2016 - https://kapsarc.opendatasoft.com/explore/dataset/investment-data-of-power-plant2007-12-2016-4/tableChina Electricity Production by Region and Source 2006-2016 - https://kapsarc.opendatasoft.com/explore/dataset/production-data2006-2-2016-4/tableChina Electricity Line Loss by Region 2006-2016 - https://kapsarc.opendatasoft.com/explore/dataset/no-name1/table/China Electricity Incremental Capacity by Region and Source 2008-2016 - https://kapsarc.opendatasoft.com/explore/dataset/incremental-capacity-data2008-3-2016-4/table/China Electricity Capacity by Power Source 2002-2016 - https://kapsarc.opendatasoft.com/explore/dataset/capacity-data2002-12-2016-4/tableChina Coal Production by Province 2011-2015 - https://kapsarc.opendatasoft.com/explore/dataset/china-coal-production-by-provinces-2011-2015/table
    • July 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 October, 2015
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    • January 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 September, 2016
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    • December 2012
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 September, 2016
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    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2015
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    • March 2016
      Source: UNESCO Institute for Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2016
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    • June 2012
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 September, 2014
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      The OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2012 presents, in a series of country profiles, the main features, strengths and weaknesses of national STI systems and major recent changes in national STI policy. The statistical dimension of the country profiles has drawn on the work and empirical research conducted by the OECD on the measurement of innovation and the development of internationally comparable STI indicators for policy analysis.   
    • February 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 September, 2016
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      This table provides information on number of exported/imported products, concentration and diversification indices by country. The concentration index shows how exports and imports of individual countries or group of countries are concentrated on several products or otherwise distributed in a more homogeneous manner among a series of products. The diversification index signals whether the structure of exports or imports by product of a given country or group of countries differ from the structure of product of the world.   1. Concentration index:Concentration index, also knows as Herfindahl-Hirschmann Index (Product HHI), is a measure of the degree of product concentration. An index value closer to 1 indicates a country's exports or imports are highly concentrated on a few products. On the contrary, values closer to 0 reflect exports or imports are more homogeneously distributed among a series of products. 2. Diversification index:The diversification index is computed by measuring the absolute deviation of the trade structure of a country from world structure. The diversification index takes values between 0 and 1. A value closer to 1 indicates greater divergence of export and import from the world pattern. On the contrary closer to 0 indicates no divergence from the world pattern.
    • December 2014
      Source: Concordia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 May, 2015
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      THE CONCORDIA PARTNERSHIP Index (the Index) was developed as a tool for public, private, and nonprofit organizations to identify opportunities to form strategic partnerships and pool resources for the implementation of innovative ideas. The Index ranks countries based on their readiness and need to engage in public-private partnerships (P3s). The inclu- sion of the need indicators sets the Index apart from other indices that measure P3 environ- ments. While the success of a P3 depends on a country’s political and market structures, the Index recognizes that for a P3 to be truly impactful it must address a large-scale need.
    • January 2017
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 January, 2017
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    • December 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 April, 2016
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      The CDIS database presents detailed data on "inward" direct investment positions (i.e. direct investment into the reporting economy) cross-classified by economy of immediate investor and data on "outward" direct investment positions (i.e. direct investment abroad by the reporting economy) cross-classified by economy of immediate investment. The CDIS database contains breakdowns of direct investment position data including in most instances separate data on net equity and net debt positions as well as tables that present "mirror" data (i.e. tables in which data from the reporting economy are shown side-by-side with the data obtained from all other counterpart reporting economies).
    • January 2016
      Source: Transparency International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 January, 2016
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      Transparency International(TI) defines corruption as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. This definition encompasses corrupt practices in both the public and private sectors. The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranks countries according to the perception of corruption in the public sector. The CPI is an aggregate indicator that combines different sources of information about corruption, making it possible to compare countries. The CPI ranks almost 200 countries by their perceived levels of corruption, as determined by expert assessments and opinion surveys.
    • March 2016
      Source: Numbeo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 April, 2016
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    • November 2014
      Source: Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics of Egypt
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 December, 2014
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    • November 2012
      Source: Freedom House
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 December, 2012
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      Countries at the Crossroads is an annual analysis of government performance in 70 strategically important countries worldwide that are at a critical crossroads in determining their political future. The in-depth comparative assessments and quantitative ratings – examining government accountability, civil liberties, rule of law, and anticorruption and transparency efforts – are intended to help international policymakers identify areas of progress, as well as to highlight areas of concern that could be addressed in diplomatic efforts and reform assistance.The Crossroads project has generated far-reaching interest since its inception in 2004. Increased attention to the relationship between competent governance and respect for civil and political rights means that scholars and policymakers require sophisticated tools to help place the performance of various governments in perspective. Crossroads helps ground this analysis by providing indispensable quantitative assessment that allows for comparison over time, as well as detailed narrative reports that provide real-world context.A new edition of Crossroads is published each year, with half the set of countries analyzed in odd years and the other half in even years. Crossroads reports are written and evaluated by some of the most prominent independent experts available for each country.
    • April 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 August, 2015
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      Global growth is forecast at 3.5 percent in 2015 and 3.8 percent in 2016, with uneven prospects across the main countries and regions of the world. The distribution of risks to near-term global growth has become more balanced relative to the October World Economic Outlook but is still tilted to the downside. The decline in oil prices could boost activity more than expected. Geopolitical tensions continue to pose threats, and risks of disruptive shifts in asset prices remain relevant. In some advanced economies, protracted low inflation or deflation also pose risks to activity. The chapter takes a region-by-region look at the recent development in the world economy and the outlook for 2015, with particular attention to notable development in countries within each region.
    • November 2015
      Source: Bloom Consulting
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 May, 2016
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      The United States of America remains number one in both the region and the world, challenged distantly by its ever-growing neighbors, Canada and Mexico, ranking second and third respectively within the Americas. Its incredible economic performance in terms of tourism receipts, almost 10 times larger than its main competitor Canada, makes the USA the absolute leader in the region despite its poorer online performance, especially in social media.
    • July 2016
      Source: Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 August, 2016
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      Reports - Statistical Releases E.16 Country Exposure Lending Survey and Country Exposure Information Report
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 November, 2016
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      Country Programmable Aid (CPA), outlined in our Development Brief  and also known as “core” aid, is the portion of aid donors programme for individual countries, and over which partner countries could have a significant say. CPA is much closer than ODA to capturing the flows of aid that goes to the partner country, and has been proven in several studies to be a good proxy of aid recorded at country level. CPA was developed in 2007 in close collaboration with DAC members. It is derived on the basis of DAC statistics and was retroactively calculated from 2000 onwards
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2016
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      Country Programmable Aid (CPA), outlined in our Development Brief  and also known as “core” aid, is the portion of aid donors programme for individual countries, and over which partner countries could have a significant say. CPA is much closer than ODA to capturing the flows of aid that goes to the partner country, and has been proven in several studies to be a good proxy of aid recorded at country level. CPA was developed in 2007 in close collaboration with DAC members. It is derived on the basis of DAC statistics and was retroactively calculated from 2000 onwards
    • March 2012
      Source: Knoema
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Country Risk Assessment Database, 2012. Source: Multiple Sources - EuroStat, WB, IMF, OECD, UNCTAD
    • April 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 April, 2016
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      COFR presents data on fiscal transparency. It provides an overview of fiscal reporting, including whether fiscal data are available for all of the general government, whether the government reports a balance sheet, and whether spending and revenue are reported on a cash or accrual basis. It also derives specific indices of the coverage of public institutions, fiscal flows, and fiscal stocks.
    • December 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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      All series on credit to the non-financial sector cover 46 economies, both advanced and emerging. They capture the outstanding amount of credit at the end of the reference quarter. Credit is provided by domestic banks, all other sectors of the economy and non-residents. In terms of financial instruments, credit covers the core debt, defined as loans, debt securities and currency & deposits.
    • December 2015
      Source: Numbeo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 March, 2016
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    • February 2013
      Source: RAND Corporation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2015
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      This report describes the results of a study of the sources and reliability of the supply of imported materials on which United States manufacturers are dependent. It should be of interest to a broad spectrum of individuals and organizations in the materials and manufacturing sectors as well as government, private sector, and non-profit organizations involved with or concerned about those sectors. This research was sponsored by the National Intelligence Council and conducted within the Intelligence Policy Center of the RAND National Defense Research Institute, a federally funded research and development center sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Staff, the Unified Combatant Commands, the Navy, the Marine Corps, the defense agencies, and the defense Intelligence Community
    • July 2015
      Source: Center for World University Rankings
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2015
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      The Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) publishes the only global university ranking that measures the quality of education and training of students as well as the prestige of the faculty members and the quality of their research without relying on surveys and university data submissions.
  • D
    • March 2014
      Source: Center for Systemic Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 August, 2014
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      The following table lists 328 episodes of armed conflict (including 30 ongoing cases) that comprise a comprehensive accounting of all forms of major armed conflicts in the world over the contemporary period: 1946-2013
    • May 2016
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 June, 2016
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      1. The Democracy Index is based on five categories: electoral process and pluralism; civil liberties; the functioning of government; political participation; and political culture. Based on their scores on a range of indicators within these categories, each country is then itself categorized as one of four types of regime: “full democracies”; “flawed democracies”; “hybrid regimes”; and “authoritarian regimes”.2. Categorization of country based on overall score (on scale of 0 to 10)10≤Full Democracies≤88
    • March 2016
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2016
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      Financing Global Health 2015 is the seventh edition of IHME’s annual series on global health financing. This report captures trends in development assistance for health (DAH) and government health expenditure as source (GHE-S) in low- and middle-income countries. Annually updated GHE-S and DAH estimates are produced to aid decision-makers and other global health stakeholders in identifying funding gaps and investment opportunities vital to improving population health. This year, IHME made a number of improvements to the data collection and methods implemented to generate Financing Global Health estimates.
    • May 2007
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2015
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      The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) is the only index that includes price data for 181 economies, which is vital in assessing effective market demand. The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) has been designed to as a tool for tracking progress in bridging the digital divide and the implementa- tion of the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS). As such, it provides a powerful policy tool for exploring the global and regional trends in infrastructure, opportu- nity and usage that are shaping the Information Society.
    • July 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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      Direct Investment Abroad: Financial Transactions without Current-Cost Adjustment, United States 2015
    • July 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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      Direct Investment Abroad: Reinvestment of Earnings Without Current Cost Adjustment, United States 2015
    • July 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2016
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      Direct Investment Position Abroad on a Historical-Cost Basis:  Country Detail by Industry, United States 2015
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2016
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      It presents the different transactions and balances to get from the GDP to the net lending/net borrowing. Therefore, it includes, in particular, national disposable income (gross and net), consumption of fixed capital as well as net saving.
    • September 2012
      Source: Americans for Divorce Reform
      Uploaded by: Carpe Facto
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      Divorce Indicators across countries
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 April, 2016
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      1. ccTLDs stands for country code Top Level Domains.2. gTLDs - stands for generic top-level domains.
    • January 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 March, 2016
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    • December 2008
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Peter Speyer
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      IHME research, published in the Lancet in 2008. The study, Tracking progress towards universal childhood immunizations and the impact of global initiatives, provides estimates with confidence intervals of the coverage of three-dose diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTP3) vaccination. The estimates take into account all publicly available data, including data from routine reporting systems and nationally representative surveys.
  • E
    • July 2013
      Source: Earth Policy Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 July, 2013
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      Contains annual data series on water consumption, irrigated area, solar water and space heating area, countries overpumping aquifers and water deficits for the countries and regions through the time period from 1961 to 2013.
    • February 2015
      Source: U.S. Geological Survey
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 April, 2015
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    • April 2014
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 May, 2016
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      The East Asia and Pacific Economic Update is the comprehensive, twice-yearly review of the region’s economies prepared by the East Asia and Pacific region of the World Bank. The report provides forward-looking analysis of the region's economic and social well-being, and includes data on key indicators for output, employment, prices, public sector, foreign trade, BOP, external debt and financial markets.
    • October 2016
      Source: Fraser Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2016
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      The economic freedom index measures the degree of economic freedom present in five major areas: [1] Size of Government; [2] Legal System and Security of Property Rights; [3] Sound Money; [4] Freedom to Trade Internationally; [5] Regulation. Within the five major areas, there are 24 components (area) in economic freedom index. Each component and sub-component is placed on a scale from 0 to 10.
    • May 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 May, 2014
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      The OECD Long Term Baseline analyzes the major economic trends beyond the OECD short-term projections. For all OECD economies, and the major non-OECD economies, it provides coverage of components of potential growth, fiscal balances and debt accumulation, domestic saving and investment balances, and external balances (through the current account). It also includes interest rates consistent with those projections. The database contains annual data to 2060. Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible for the countries covered. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD statistical publications such as the Annual National Accounts, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations, and Eurostat.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 January, 2017
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      The OECD Economic Outlook analyses the major economic trends over the coming 2 to 3 years. It provides in-depth coverage of the main economic issues and the policy measures required to foster growth in each member country. Forthcoming developments in major non-OECD economies are also evaluated in detail. Each edition of the Outlook provides a unique resource to keep abreast of world economic developments. The OECD Economic Outlook database is a comprehensive and consistent macroeconomic database of the OECD economies, covering expenditures, foreign trade, output, labour markets, interest and exchange rates, balance of payments, and government debt. For the non-OECD regions, foreign trade and current account series are available. The database contains annual for the projection period. Variables are defined in such a way that they are as homogenous as possible for the countries covered. Breaks in underlying series are corrected as far as possible. Sources for the historical data are publications of national statistical agencies and OECD statistical publications such as the Quarterly National Accounts, the Annual National Accounts, the Labour Force Statistics and the Main Economic Indicators. The cut-off date for information used in the compilation of the projections was the 18 May 2016. Concerning the aggregation of world trade, a new composition has been introduced, since projections are now made for the major non-OECD economies. Thus, besides OECD and the OECD euro area, the following new regions are available: Dynamic Asian Economies (Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam); Oil Producers (Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Brunei, Timor-Leste, Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Ecuador, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela, Algeria, Angola, Chad, Rep. of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Nigeria, Sudan); with the remaining countries in a residual 'Rest of the World' group.
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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    • December 2012
      Source: Liberia Institute of Statistics & Geo-Information Services
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 May, 2013
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    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Misha Gusev
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      Calculated using Mean Years of Schooling and Expected Years of Schooling.
    • January 2016
      Source: Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies, Burundi
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 May, 2016
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      Publication: http://www.isteebu.bi/images/annuaires/annuaire%20statistique%20du%20burundi%202014.pdf
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      The present data collection consists of the following indicators:Interest rates : Day-to-day money market interest rates, 3-month interest rates, Euro yields and Long term government bond yields - Maastricht definitionEuro/Ecu exchange rates: Exchange rates against the ECU/euroEffective exchange rates indices : Nominal Effective Exchange Rate, Real Effective Exchange Rate Â
    • December 2012
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 November, 2016
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      These tables are a complement to the report Agricultural Policy Monitoring and Evaluation 2012 : OECD COUNTRIES. They comprise the summary of agricultural support estimates for OECD countries.
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 July, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 July, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 August, 2015
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    • February 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 August, 2015
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 August, 2015
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    • February 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 August, 2015
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    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • March 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
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      The Energy Architecture Performance Index (EAPI) uses a set of indicators to highlight the performance of various countries across each facet of their energy architecture, determining to what extent nations have been able to create affordable, sustainable and secure energy systems
    • April 2012
      Source: Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation, Government of India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 December, 2013
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      Source: Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas. Note: Annual changes and shares of total are calculated using million tonnes per annum figures.
    • October 2015
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 October, 2015
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      The reliability and availability of infrastructure and the provision of utility services is crucial for development. The quality of infrastructure is measured by indicators assessing the wait times to obtain selected utility services, as well as the disruption of these services. The thirteen indicators measure the reliability and provision of infrastructure services in 144 countries. In addition, the estimated cost burden due to the inadequate provision of electricity is provided.
    • September 2014
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 June, 2015
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      The Enterprise Surveys use standard survey instruments to collect firm-level data on the business environment from business owners and top managers. The surveys cover a broad range of topics including access to finance, corruption, infrastructure, crime, competition, labor, obstacles to growth, and performance measures.The full, firm-level data are available to researchers and include answers from all the survey questions- both global questions as well as country-specific questions. Note that the survey data results presented on the website are primarily in the form of indicators, i.e. firm-level data has been aggregated to the country level.
    • October 2015
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 October, 2015
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      1: Most surveys were administered using the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology as outlined in the Methodology page, while some others did not strictly adhere to the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology. For example, for surveys which do not follow the Global Methodology, the Universe under consideration may have consisted of only manufacturing firms or the questionnaire used may have been different from the standard global questionnaire. Data users should exercise caution when comparing raw data and point estimates between surveys that did and did not adhere to the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology. For surveys which did not adhere to the Global Methodology plus Afghanistan 2008, any inference from one of these surveys is representative only for the data sample itself. 2: Regional and "all countries" averages of indicators are computed by taking a simple average of country-level point estimates. For each economy, only the latest available year of survey data is used in this computation. Only surveys, posted during the years 2009-2015, and adhering to the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology are used to compute these regional and "all countries" averages. 3: Descriptions of firm subgroup levels, e.g. how the ex post groupings are constructed, are provided in the Indicator Descriptions (PDF, 710KB) document. 4: Statistics derived from less than or equal to five firms are displayed with an "n.a." to maintain confidentiality and should be distinguished from ".." which indicates missing values. Also note for three growth-related indicators under the "Performance" topic, these indicators are not computed when they are derived from less than 30 firms. 5: Standard errors are labeled "n.c.", meaning not computed, for the following:    1) indicators for all surveys that were not conducted using the Enterprise Surveys Global Methodology and    2) for indicator breakdowns by ex post groupings: exporter or ownership type, and gender of the top manager.
    • August 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 September, 2014
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    • October 2011
      Source: United Nations Statistics Division
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      UNSD Environmental Indicators disseminate global environment statistics on ten indicator themes compiled from a wide range of data sources. The themes and indicator tables were selected based on the current demands for international environmental statistics and the availability of internationally comparable data. Statistics on Water and Waste are based on official statistics supplied by national statistical offices and/or ministries of environment (or equivalent institutions) in response to the biennial UNSD/UNEP Questionnaire on Environment Statistics, complemented with comparable statistics from OECD and Eurostat, and water resources data from FAO Aquastat. Statistics on other themes were compiled by UNSD from other international sources. In a few cases, UNSD has made some calculations in order to derive the indicators. However, generally no adjustments have been made to the values received from the source. UNSD is not responsible for the quality, completeness/availability, and validity of the data. Environment statistics is still in an early stage of development in many countries, and data are often sparse. The indicators selected here are those of relatively good quality and geographic coverage. Information on data quality and comparability is given at the end of each table together with other important metadata.
    • January 2016
      Source: Environmental Performance Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 March, 2016
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    • January 2016
      Source: Environmental Performance Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 March, 2016
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      A “proximity-to-target methodology” is used to assess how close each country is to an identified policy target. Country scores are determined by how close or far countries are to targets. Scores are standardized (i.e., on a scale of 0 to 100) for comparability, weighting, and aggregation. The Environmental Performance Index (EPI) is constructed through the calculation and aggregation of 20 indicators reflecting national-level environmental data. These indicators are combined into nine issue categories, each of which fit under one of two overarching objectives. The two objectives that provide the overarching structure of the EPI are Environmental Health and Ecosystem Vitality. Environmental Health measures the protection of human health from environmental harm. Ecosystem Vitality measures ecosystem protection and resource management. These two objectives are further divided into nine issue categories that span high-priority environmental policy issues, including air quality, forests, fisheries, and climate and energy, among others. The issue categories are extensive but not comprehensive. Underlying the nine issue categories are 20 indicators calculated from country-level data and statistics. After more than 15 years of work on environmental performance measurement and six iterations of the EPI, global data are still lacking on a number of key environmental issues. These include: freshwater quality, toxic chemical exposures, municipal solid waste management, nuclear safety, wetlands loss, agricultural soil quality and degradation, recycling rates, adaptation, vulnerability, and resiliency to climate change, desertification.
    • August 2011
      Source: Multiple Sources
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      A compilation of monthly closing stock indices for major stock exchanges across the World. This dataset is updated on a monthly basis.
    • September 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2016
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    • January 2010
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      This dataset provides an overview of the most recent and pertinent annual energy related statistics in Europe. The data is drawn from several sources: the European Commission’s services; international organisations, such as the European Environment Agency and the International Energy Agency and, where no data is currently available, from the European Commission’s estimations. The indicator calculations follow the methodology established by the European Commission - DG Energy.
    • May 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2015
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      The Scoreboard has been prepared from companies' annual reports and accounts received by an independent data provider.
    • September 2015
      Source: Multiple Sources
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 September, 2015
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    • February 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 August, 2016
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      Monthly prices for about 600 fish products and an overview of the major trends on the European market, reported by an extensive correspondent network. Abstract: May is the generally the time of the year when traders are restocking for the summer sales. This year, the relatively higher value of the euro has made European importers competitive again on the world market, and sales are quite strong at the moment. With 30 Members having formally deposited their instruments of adherence, the Port State Measures Agreement (PSMA), an international accord intended to combat Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing, is set to become international law on 5 June 2016,. The PSMA, whose development through international dialogue and expert consultation has been driven and coordinated by FAO, focuses on preventing IUU fishing by requiring that parties designate specific ports for use by foreign vessels and introducing controls and procedures to make it more difficult for IUU fish to enter national or international markets. 
    • January 2017
      Source: XE
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 January, 2017
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      This dataset contains the exchange rate of 1USD to their country local currency.
    • October 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 October, 2015
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      Recent exchange rate movements have been unusually large, triggering a debate regarding their likely effects on trade. Historical experience in advanced and emerging market and developing economies suggests that exchange rate movements typically have sizable effects on export and import volumes. A 10 percent real effective depreciation in an economy’s currency is associated with a rise in real net exports of, on average, 1.5 percent of GDP, with substantial cross-country variation around this average. Although these effects fully materialize over a number of years, much of the adjustment occurs in the first year. The boost to exports associated with currency depreciation is found to be largest in countries with initial economic slack and with domestic financial systems that are operating normally. Some evidence suggests that the rise of global value chains has weakened the relationship between exchange rates and trade in intermediate products used as inputs into other economies’ exports. However, the bulk of global trade still consists of conventional trade, and there is little evidence of a general trend toward disconnect between exchange rates and total exports and imports.
    • March 2015
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 April, 2016
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      This table shows exchange rates for currencies used in over 190 world economies presented in a crossrates layout where countries are presented in both rows and columns. National currency per US dollars exchange rates are used to derive explicit exchange rates for each of the countries presented with regard to any other country. Country series are consistent over time: for example, a conversion was made from national currency to Euro for the Euro Zone economies for all years prior to the adoption of Euro.
    • October 2016
      Source: InterNations
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2016
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    • July 2012
      Source: Knoema
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Source : United States Department of Agriculture; International Monetary Fund; UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs; Food and Agriculture Organization, The World Bank
    • August 2016
      Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 September, 2016
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      Percent of household final consumption expenditures spent on food, alcoholic beverages, and tobacco that were consumed at home, 2009-2012. The data are computed by Birgit Meade (202-694-5159), ERS/USDA, EUROMONITOR data, June 2015.
    • September 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 October, 2016
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      This table presents trade in services by service category for individual countries, expressed in millions of dollars and as percentages of a country's total trade in services. The commercial services, which exclude government services and follow the GATS definition, are included as well.
    • July 2014
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 July, 2014
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      This table is a compilation of statistics of trade in goods and services as reported in the Balance of Payments. The conceptual framework used for the compilation is based on the IMF Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5, 1993).
    • February 2016
      Source: Coffee Board of India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2016
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    • September 2013
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 October, 2013
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      This table presents information on the external long-term indebtedness of developing economies (as debtors), expressed in millions of dollars, expressed as percentage of total long-term debt, as percentage of debt source and as percentage of region. The table also provides breakdown of public and publicly guaranteed debt by source of lending (as creditors).
    • September 2005
      Source: National Institute of Statistics, Guinea Bissau
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 June, 2013
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      External Trade of Guinea-Bissau, 2006
  • F
    • June 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 June, 2014
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      OECD Factbook provides a global overview of today’s major economic, social and environmental indicators which cover a wide range of areas: agriculture, economic production, education, energy, environment, foreign aid, health, industry, information and communications, international trade, labour force, population, taxation, public expenditure and R&D. More countries than ever are covered in greater detail, enabling direct comparisons for many indicators between OECD Members and Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russian Federation and South Africa.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 June, 2016
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      OECD Factbook provides a global overview of today's major economic, social and environmental indicators which cover a wide range of areas: agriculture, economic production, education, energy, environment, foreign aid, health, industry, information and communications, international trade, labor force, population, taxation, public expenditure and R&D. More countries than ever are covered in greater detail, enabling direct comparisons for many indicators between OECD Members and Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russian Federation and South Africa.
    • July 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
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      Accessed On: 01 July, 2015
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      The FAO indices of agricultural production show the relative level of the aggregate volume of agricultural production for each year in comparison with the base period 2004-2006. They are based on the sum of price-weighted quantities of different agricultural commodities produced after deductions of quantities used as seed and feed weighted in a similar manner. The resulting aggregate represents, therefore, disposable production for any use except as seed and feed. All the indices at the country, regional and world levels are calculated by the Laspeyres formula. Production quantities of each commodity are weighted by 2004-2006 average international commodity prices and summed for each year. To obtain the index, the aggregate for a given year is divided by the average aggregate for the base period 2004-2006. Since the FAO indices are based on the concept of agriculture as a single enterprise, amounts of seed and feed are subtracted from the production data to avoid double counting them, once in the production data and once with the crops or livestock produced from them. Deductions for seed (in the case of eggs, for hatching) and for livestock and poultry feed apply to both domestically produced and imported commodities. They cover only primary agricultural products destined to animal feed (e.g. maize, potatoes, milk, etc.). Processed and semi-processed feed items such as bran, oilcakes, meals and molasses have been completely excluded from the calculations at all stages. It should be noted that when calculating indices of agricultural, food and nonfood production, all intermediate primary inputs of agricultural origin are deducted. However, for indices of any other commodity group, only inputs originating from within the same group are deducted; thus, only seed is removed from the group “crops” and from all crop subgroups, such as cereals, oil crops, etc.; and both feed and seed originating from within the livestock sector (e.g. milk feed, hatching eggs) are removed from the group “livestock products”. For the main two livestock subgroups, namely, meat and milk, only feed originating from the respective subgroup is removed. The”international commodity prices” are used in order to avoid the use of exchange rates for obtaining continental and world aggregates, and also to improve and facilitate international comparative analysis of productivity at the national level. These” international prices”, expressed in so-called”international dollars”, are derived using a Geary-Khamis formula for the agricultural sector. This method assigns a single “price” to each commodity. For example, one metric ton of wheat has the same price regardless of the country where it was produced. The currency unit in which the prices are expressed has no influence on the indices published. The commodities covered in the computation of indices of agricultural production are all crops and livestock products originating in each country. Practically all products are covered, with the main exception of fodder crops. The category of food production includes commodities that are considered edible and that contain nutrients. Accordingly, coffee and tea are excluded along with inedible commodities because, although edible, they have practically no nutritive value. Indices for meat production are computed based on data for production from indigenous animals, which takes account of the meat equivalent of exported live animals but excludes the meat equivalent of imported live animals. For index purposes, annual changes in livestock and poultry numbers or in their average live weight are not taken into account. The indices are calculated from production data presented on a calendar year basis. The FAO indices may differ from those produced by the countries themselves because of differences in concepts of production, coverage, weights, time reference of data and methods of calculation
    • July 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 August, 2016
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      AQUASTAT is FAO's global information system on water and agriculture, developed by the Land and Water Division. The main mandate of the programme is to collect, analyze and disseminate information on water resources, water uses, and agricultural water management with an emphasis on countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. This allows interested users to find comprehensive and regularly updated information at global, regional, and national levels.
    • June 2012
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 July, 2012
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      This dataset represents Food Consumption, Food Production and Trade by various Food items. Note: data represent values for time periods (1990-1992, 1995-97, 2000-02, 2005-07) and is shown as data for the last year of time period (1992, 1997, 2002, 2007).
    • August 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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      The Price domain of FAOSTAT contains annual data on prices received by farmers (called Producer prices) for primary crops, live animals, livestock primary products as collected at the point of initial sale (prices paid at the farm-gate). Data are provided for over 130 countries and for some 200 commodities, representing over 97 percent of the world’s value of gross agricultural production (at 1999-2001 International Dollar Prices). PriceSTAT contains data from 1991 onwards. The Price domain provides price data in three units: i) Local Currency Units (LCU) ii) Standard Local Currency (SLC) iii) US Dollars.
    • October 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2017
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      Producer Price Indices - AnnualIndices of agricultural producer prices measure the average annual change over time in the selling prices received by farmers (prices at the farm-gate or at the first point of sale). Annual data are provided for over 80 countries. The three categories of producer price indices available in FAOSTAT comprise: Single-item price indices, Commodity group indices and the Agriculture producer price index.
    • November 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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      Farmers produce food and fiber using a wide variety of farm practices and management systems that differ by commodity, region, and farm and operator characteristics. The mix of inputs, practices, and technologies used by farmers, when combined with land, labor, and water resources, affects production costs; farm income; and soil, water and air quality.
    • February 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 February, 2016
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      Value of gross production has been compiled by multiplying gross production in physical terms by output prices at farm gate. Thus, value of production measures production in monetary terms at the farm gate level. Since intermediate uses within the agricultural sector (seed and feed) have not been subtracted from production data, this value of production aggregate refers to the notion of "gross production". Value of gross production is provided in both current and constant terms and is expressed in US dollars and Standard Local Currency (SLC). The current value of production measures value in the prices relating to the period being measured. Thus, it represents the market value of food and agricultural products at the time they were produced. Knowing this figure is helpful in understanding exactly what was happening within a given economy at that point in time. Often, this information can help explain economic trends that emerged in later periods and why they took place. Value of production in constant terms is derived using the average prices of a selected year or years, known as the base period. Constant price series can be used to show how the quantity or volume of products has changed, and are often referred to as volume measures. The ratio of the current and constant price series gives a measure of price movements. US dollar figures for value of gross production are converted from local currencies using official exchange rates as prevailing in the respective years. The SLC of a country is the local currency prevailing in the latest year. Expressing data series in one uniform currency is useful because it avoids the influence of revaluation in local currency, if any, on value of production
    • October 2011
      Source: Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 December, 2012
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      FAPRI U.S. and World Outlook presents multi-year projections for the United States and world agricultural sectors. These projections serve as a baseline for evaluating and comparing alternative macroeconomic, policy, weather, and technological scenarios. These reports have been produced annually and used by congressional and agricultural leaders since 1985.
    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2016
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    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 May, 2016
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    • June 2010
      Source: International Federation of Association Football
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 June, 2014
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      FIFA is the international governing body of association football, futsal and beach soccer. Its membership comprises 209 national associations. Its headquarters are in Zurich, Switzerland, and its president is Sepp Blatter. FIFA is responsible for the organisation of football's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup.
    • August 2013
      Source: International Fertilizer Industry Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 October, 2013
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      Assessment of Fertilizer Use by Crop at the Global Level 2011. Fully understanding the contribution of the different crop types to fertilizer use at national, regional and global levels is a prerequisite to the development of sound fertilizer demand forecasts. IFA gathers information on fertilizer use by crop in the main fertilizer-consuming countries. IFA's Assessment currently covers 23 countries (considering the EU-27 as a single country), which account together for more than 90% of world fertilizer consumption, making it possible to analyze fertilizer use by crop type at the global level.
    • December 2016
      Source: International Federation of Association Football
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 December, 2016
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      Monthly updates of FIFA World Football Men's Ranking 
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 November, 2016
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      It presents the final consumption expenditure of households broken down by the COICOP (Classification of Individual Consumption According to Purpose) classification and by durability.  It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to annual national accounts questionnaire. This questionnaire is designed to collect internationally comparable data according to the 1993 SNA. In national currency, in current prices and constant prices (national base year, previous year prices and OECD base year i.e. 2010). Expressed in millions. For the Euro area countries, the data in national currency for all years are calculated using the fixed conversion rates against the euro.
    • January 2017
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 January, 2017
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      Accommodation statistics describe the supply and use of hotel services, and provide data on the numbers of users of these services and on overnight stays. Arrivals, Nights spend, Change of nights spend, %, (3). Note: 2016 Annual data is sum of January to May and for rest of the years from January to December
    • January 2017
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 January, 2017
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      The statistics on balance of payments describes the external balance of the national economy from the perspectives of both real and financial economy.
    • February 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2016
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      Employment statistics are annual statistics providing data by region on the population’s economic activity and employment.
    • July 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 January, 2017
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      The statistics present information about total consumption of energy, electricity production and total consumption and imports and exports of energy.
    • October 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2016
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      Direct investments to Finland describe the capital that a foreign investor has invested directly in a unit located in Finland under the investors' control or influence.
    • February 2016
      Source: Finnish Customs
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 July, 2016
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      Foreign trade statistics provide information on the goods trade between Finland and the other EU member states and third countries. Customs compiles statistics on the value and transports of foreign trade and on border traffic.
    • May 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 July, 2016
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      Statistics on international trade in services describe Finnish enterprises’ international sales and imports of services by service type and target country.
    • April 2016
      Source: Statistics Finland
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 July, 2016
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      These statistics on the structure of the population describe Finnish and foreign citizens permanently resident in Finland at the turn of the year.
    • December 2015
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2016
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      First Year Expenditures and Planned Total Expenditures for Investments Initiated in 2015, Country of UBO by Type of Investment
    • August 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 August, 2015
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      A food balance sheet presents a comprehensive picture of the pattern of a country's food supply during a specified reference period. The food balance sheet shows for each food item i.e. each primary commodity availability for human consumption which corresponds to the sources of supply and its utilisation. The total quantity of foodstuffs produced in a country added to the total quantity imported and adjusted to any change in stocks that may have occurred since the beginning of the reference period gives the supply available during that period. On the utilisation side a distinction is made between the quantities exported, fed to livestock + used for seed, losses during storage and transportation, and food supplies available for human consumption. The per capita supply of each such food item available for human consumption is then obtained by dividing the respective quantity by the related data on the population actually partaking in it. Data on per capita food supplies are expressed in terms of quantity and by applying appropriate food composition factors for all primary and processed products also in terms of dietary energy value, protein and fat content. The Food Balances domain covers: Production Trade Feed and Seed Waste Other utilisation Consumption Elements covered: Quantities Calories, Proteins, Fats
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 August, 2015
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    • January 2017
      Source: Knoema
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2017
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      Collect food prices data in your country and earn up to $120 every month.We are looking for data collectors who will go to the specific markets weekly, collect data on food prices for about 25 items and submit them into our system.
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 May, 2015
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      Food supply data is some of the most important data in FAOSTAT. In fact, this data is for the basis for estimation of global and national undernourishment assessment, when it is combined with parameters and other data sets. This data has been the foundation of food balance sheets ever since they were first constructed. The data is accessed by both business and governments for economic analysis and policy setting, as well as being used by the academic community. The agricultural supply domain covers food commodities that have been converted back into primary equivalents: Quantity Dietary Energy Proteins Fats Totals and per Capita
    • April 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 May, 2015
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      Food supply data is some of the most important data in FAOSTAT. In fact, this data is for the basis for estimation of global and national undernourishment assessment, when it is combined with parameters and other data sets.This data has been the foundation of food balance sheets ever since they were first constructed. The data is accessed by both business and governments for economic analysis and policy setting, as well as being used by the academic community. The agricultural supply domain covers food commodities that have been converted back into primary equivalents: Quantity Dietary Energy, Proteins, Fats, Totals and per Capita
    • June 2016
      Source: Forbes
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 September, 2016
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      Most innovation rankings are popularity contests based on past performance or editorial whims. We set out to create something very different with the World’s Most Innovative Companies list, using the wisdom of the crowd. Our method relies on investors’ ability to identify firms they expect to be innovative now and in the future.
    • September 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 October, 2014
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      The number of students enrolled refers to the count of students studying in the reference period. Each student enrolled in the education programmes covered by the corresponding category is counted once and only once. National data collection systems permitting, the statistics reflect the number of students enrolled at the beginning of the school / academic year. Preferably, the end (or near-end) of the first month of the school / academic year is chosen (special arrangements are made for part-year students who may not start studies at the beginning of the school year). Students are classified as foreign students (non-citizens) if they are not citizens of the country in which the data are collected. While pragmatic and operational, this classification is inappropriate for capturing student mobility because of differing national policies regarding the naturalisation of immigrants. Countries that have lower propensity to grant permanent residence to its immigrant populations are likely to report second generation immigrants as foreign students. Therefore, for student mobility and bilateral comparisons, interpretations of data based on the concept of foreign students should be made with caution. Students are classified as international students if they left their country of origin and moved to another country for the purpose of study. Depending on country-specific immigration legislation, mobility arrangements, and data availability, international students may be defined as students who are not permanent or usual residents of their country of study or alternatively as students who obtained their prior education in a different country, including another EU country.
    • October 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 December, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 December, 2016
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      The activities of multinational enterprises statistics available here provide a picture of the overall activities of U.S. affiliates of foreign parents and contain a wide variety of indicators of their financial structure and operations. These statistics cover items that are needed in analyzing the characteristics, performance, and economic impact of MNEs, and are obtained from mandatory surveys of U.S. affiliates of foreign parents conducted by BEA.
    • January 2016
      Source: Statistics Centre of Abu Dhabi
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 May, 2016
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    • June 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 July, 2012
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      This Dataset contains 5 Tables. Foreign official reserves - Annual data (mny_for_a); Foreign official reserves - Quarterly data (mny_for_q); Foreign official reserves - Monthly data (mny_for_m); Monetary gold in fine troy ounces - Yearly data (mny_for_gold_a); Monetary gold in fine troy ounces - Monthly data (mny_for_gold_m). Note: i) All data in the datasets represents 'Value at the end of the period (END)'. ii): Eurostat Hierarchy: Economy and finance > Monetary and other financial statistics (mny) > Foreign official reserves (mny_for).
    • January 2017
      Source: U.S. Census Bureau
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 January, 2017
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    • June 2016
      Source: Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 July, 2016
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    • July 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2015
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    • June 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 May, 2016
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    • March 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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    • July 2016
      Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2016
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      World and National CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Cement Manufacture, and Gas Flaring. Source: Tom Boden, Gregg Marland and Bob Andres (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)
    • June 2016
      Source: Fund for Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      The FSI focuses on the indicators of risk and is based on thousands of articles and reports that are processed by our CAST Software from electronically available sources. Measures of fragility, like Demographic Pressures,Refugees and IDPs and etc., have been scaled on 0 to 10 where 10 is highest fragility and 0 no fragility.
    • January 2017
      Source: Freedom House
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2017
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      Freedom in the World is Freedom House’s flagship annual report, assessing the condition of political rights and civil liberties around the world. It is composed of numerical ratings and supporting descriptive texts for 195 countries and 15 territories. Freedom in the World has been published since 1973, allowing Freedom House to track global trends in freedom over more than 40 years. It has become the most widely read and cited report of its kind, used on a regular basis by policymakers, journalists, academics, activists, and many others.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 September, 2016
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      This dataset shows the state and changes over time in the abstractions of freshwater resources in OECD countries. Water abstractions are a major pressure on freshwater resources, particularly from public water supplies, irrigation, industrial processes and cooling of electric power plants. It has significant implications for issues of quantity and quality of water resources. This dataset shows water abstractions by source (surface and ground water) and by major uses. Water abstractions refer to water taken from ground or surface water sources and conveyed to the place of use. If the water is returned to a surface water source, abstraction of the same water by the downstream user is counted again in compiling total withdrawal. When interpreting those data, it should be borne in mind that the definitions and estimation methods employed by Member countries may vary considerably among countries.
    • November 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 February, 2016
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      Data include pension funds per the OECD classification by type of pension plans and by type of pension funds. All types of plans are included (occupational and personal, mandatory and voluntary). The OECD classification considers both funded and book reserved pension plans that are workplace-based (occupational pension plans) or accessed directly in retail markets (personal pension plans). Both mandatory and voluntary arrangements are included. The data include plans where benefits are paid by a private sector entity (classified as private pension plans by the OECD) as well as those paid by a funded public sector entity. A full description of the OECD classification can be found at:http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/0/49/38356329.pdf. Pension funds include also some personal pension arrangements like the Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) in the United States as well as funds for government workers. The coverage of the statistics follows the regulatory and supervisory framework. All authorised pension funds are therefore normally covered by the Global Pension Statistics exercise. Assets pertaining to reserve funds in social security systems are excluded.
    • February 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 February, 2016
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      Data include pension funds per the OECD classification by type of pension plans and by type of pension funds. All types of plans are included (occupational and personal, mandatory and voluntary). The OECD classification considers both funded and book reserved pension plans that are workplace-based (occupational pension plans) or accessed directly in retail markets (personal pension plans). Both mandatory and voluntary arrangements are included. The data include plans where benefits are paid by a private sector entity (classified as private pension plans by the OECD) as well as those paid by a funded public sector entity. A full description of the OECD classification can be found at: http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/0/49/38356329.pdf. Pension funds include also some personal pension arrangements like the Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) in the United States as well as funds for government workers. The coverage of the statistics follows the regulatory and supervisory framework. All authorised pension funds are therefore normally covered by the Global Pension Statistics exercise. Assets pertaining to reserve funds in social security systems are excluded.
  • G
    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 January, 2017
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      The G20 CPI has been calculated for the headline indicators only (CPI All items / HICP Total). It is an annual chain-linked Laspeyres-type index. The weights for each country in each link are based on the previous year's relative share of individual final consumption expenditure of households and non-profit institutions serving households expressed in Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs). Other Aspects Recommended uses and limitations The G20 consists of the following economies: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the European Union. The G20 aggregate is calculated taking the fifteen individual country members of the G20 (other than France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom) plus the European Union as an aggregate. In calculating the monthly percentage change of the CPI G20 aggregate, the officially reported data for Argentina have been used. Data from January 2014 onwards exclude Argentina during 2014 for annual inflation rates and index series (2010=100).
    • December 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 December, 2016
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      Consumer price indices (CPIs) measure inflation as price changes of a representative basket of goods and services typically purchased by households. The G20 CPI aggregate reflects national CPIs for all G20 countries (with the exception of Turkey) that are not part of the European Union (EU) while it reflects the Harmonised Indices of Consumer Prices (HICP) for the EU, its Member States and for Turkey. It is an annual chain-linked Laspeyres-type index. The weights for each country in each link are based on the previous year’s relative share of individual final consumption expenditure of households and non-profit institutions serving households expressed in Purchasing Power Parities (PPPs). The table presents the data for all non-EU countries. The HICP tables for France, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the euro area and European Union can be found under the HICP tables.
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • February 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 February, 2015
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      The GID-DB is a database providing researchers and policymakers with key data on gender-based discrimination in social institutions. This data helps analyse women’s economic empowerment and understand gender gaps in other key areas of development. Covering 160 countries, the GID-DB contains comprehensive information on legal, cultural and traditional practices that discriminate against women and girls.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
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      It provides a faithful image, to the greatest extent possible, of the aggregates and balances of the general government sector in the SNA 1993 conceptual framework. In addition, it brings to light two relevant aggregates that do not belong to this conceptual frame work: the Total Revenue and the Total Expenditure of the general government sector.Unit of measure used - National currency; current prices. Expressed in millions.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2016
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    • October 2016
      Source: German Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 October, 2016
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      Facts and figures on the Electrical & Electronic industry
    • February 2016
      Source: Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 August, 2016
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      Direct greenhouse gases: Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Methane (CH4), Nitrous Oxide (N2O), Hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-23, 32, 125, 134a, 143a, 152a, 227ea, 236fa, 245fa, 365mfc, 43-10-mee), Perfluorocarbons (PFCs: CF4, C2F6, C3F8, c-C4F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Nitrogen Trifluoride (NF3) and Sulfuryl Fluoride (SO2F2). Emissions are calculated by individual countries using country-specific information. The countries are organized in different world regions for illustration purposes. Emissions of some small countries are presented together with other countries depending on country definition and availability of activity statistics. Source: European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC)/PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency.
    • September 2016
      Source: Knight Frank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 October, 2016
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      Note: Countries are ranked according to 12-month price growth. The Knight Frank Global House Price Index established in 2006 allows investors and developers to monitor and compare the performance of mainstream residential markets across the world. The index is compiled on a quarterly basis using official government statistics or central bank data where available. The index’s overall performance is weighted by GDP and the latest quarter’s data is provisional pending the release of all the countries’ results.
    • October 2015
      Source: HelpAge International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2015
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      The aim of the Index is both to capture the multidimensional nature of the quality of life and wellbeing of older people, and to provide a means by which to measure performance and promote improvements. We have chosen 13 different indicators for the four key domains of Income security, Health status, Capability, and Enabling environment. Domain 1: Income security The income security domain assesses people's access to a sufficient amount of income, and the capacity to use it independently, in order to meet basic needs in older age. Domain 2: Health status The three indicators used for the health domain provide information about physical and psychological wellbeing. Domain 3: Capability The employment and education indicators in this domain look at different aspects of the empowerment of older people. Domain 4: Enabling environment This domain uses data from Gallup World View to assess older people's perception of social connectedness, safety, civic freedom and access to public transport - issues older people have singled out as particularly important.
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      This database contains statistics on production volume and value by species, country or area, fishing area and culture environment
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      Contains the volume of fish catches landed by country or territory of capture, by species or a higher taxonomic level, by FAO major fishing areas, and year for all commercial, industrial, recreational and subsistence purpose
    • June 2016
      Source: Deloitte
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 June, 2016
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      With the release of the 2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index (GMCI), Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (Deloitte Global) and the Council on Competitiveness (the Council) in the US build upon the GMCI research, with prior studies published in 2010 and 2013. The results of the 2016 study clearly show the ongoing influence manufacturing has on driving global economies. From its influence on infrastructure development, job creation, and contribution to gross domestic product (GDP) on both an overall and per capita basis, a strong manufacturing sector creates a clear path toward economic prosperity.
    • October 2013
      Source: Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 November, 2013
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      PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency is the national institute for strategic policy analyses in the fields of the environment, nature and spatial planning. For global CO2 emissions from 1970 to 2008 it is used the EDGAR 4.2 data set for greenhouse gases, the results from a joint project of the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, published in November 2011. This data set provides greenhouse gas emissions per country and on a 0.1 x 0.1 degree grid for all anthropogenic sources identified by the IPCC (JRC/PBL, 2011) for the period 1970-2008. Although the data set distinguishes about 25 sources categories, emissions are estimated for well over 100 detailed categories as identified in the Revised 1996 IPCC guidelines for compilation of emission inventories (IPCC, 1996). The core EDGAR 4.2 dataset was extended to 2010 using a fast-track approach based on IEA (2012) fuel-use trends for 2009-2010, for the greenhouse gas section in last year’s CO2 report of IEA (Olivier and Janssens-Maenhout, 2012) and it is this extended EDGAR 4.2 FT2010 data set that is used for this assessment.
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      This database contains statistics on the annual production of fishery commodities and imports and exports of fishery commodities by country and commodities in terms of volume and value from 1976.
    • November 2016
      Source: DHL
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2016
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      DHL released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI), a detailed analysis of the state of globalization around the world. The latest report, authored by internationally acclaimed globalization expert Professor Pankaj Ghemawat together with Steven A. Altman, shows that global connectedness, measured by cross-border flows of trade, capital, information and people, has recovered most of its losses incurred during the financial crisis. Especially the depth of international interactions – the proportion of interactions that cross national borders – gained momentum in 2013 after its recovery had stalled in the previous year. Nonetheless, trade depth, as a distinct dimension of globalization, continues to stagnate and the overall level of global connectedness remains quite limited, implying that there could be gains of trillions of US dollars if boosted in future years.
    • February 2015
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2015
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      The aim of this data set is to provide a snapshot of where countries stand in their cybersecurity engagement at the national level. The visions as seen by ABI Research and ITU is to promote cybersecurity awareness and the important role governments have to play in integrating appropriate mechanisms to both support and promote this crucial discipline. Safeguarding the integrity of cyberspace must involve the development of cybersecurity.
    • December 2015
      Source: Global Democracy Ranking
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 January, 2016
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      The Democracy Ranking is an annual ranking of all democracies (country-based democracies) in the world by focusing on the Quality of Democracy in an international perspective. The Democracy Ranking publishes the ranking scores and displays ranking score increases or decreases over time. The Democracy Ranking is a ranking of the Quality of Democracy in the sense that the ranking scores should reflect a ranking of democracies according to their differing qualities; and the Democracy Ranking is a ranking for the Quality of Democracy, because it wants to contribute conceptually to how democracy quality may be measured as well as wants to support the awareness how important democracy quality is for the further development, reform and enhancement of democracies.
    • July 2013
      Source: ONE
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 July, 2013
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      Dataset represents the results of the survey, conducted in order to reveal people's expectations about the improvments that they think are of primary importance when determining Global Development Goals on post-2015 period.
    • August 2015
      Source: Grant Thornton
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2015
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      The Grant Thornton Global Dynamism Index (GDI) ranks 60 leading economies on their dynamism in five key areas – business operating environment, economics & growth, science & technology, labour & human capital and financing environment. The GDI analyses 22 indicators across these five categories to assess the dynamism of business growth environments around the world, where dynamism refers to the changes in an economy over the past 12 months which are likely to lead to a faster future rate of growth.
    • January 2013
      Source: Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 June, 2013
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      Emissions are calculated for the following substances: 1) Direct greenhouse gases: Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Methane (CH4), Nitrous Oxide (N2O), Hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-23, 32, 125, 134a, 143a, 152a, 227ea, 236fa, 245fa, 365mfc, 43-10-mee), Perfluorocarbons (PFCs: CF4, C2F6, C3F8, c-C4F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Nitrogen Trifluoride (NF3) and Sulfuryl Fluoride (SO2F2); 2) Ozone precursor gases: Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOC) and Methane (CH4). 3) Acidifying gases: Ammonia (NH3), Nitrogen oxides (NOx) and Sulfur Dioxide (SO2). 4) Primary particulates: Fine Particulate Matter (PM10) - Carbonaceous speciation (BC , OC) is under progress. 5) Stratospheric Ozone Depleting Substances: Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, 12, 113, 114, 115), Halons (1211, 1301, 2402), Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC-22, 124, 141b, 142b), Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4), Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) and Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl2). Emissions (EM) for a country C are calculated for each compound x on an annual basis (y) and sector wise (for i sectors, multiplying on the one hand the country-specific activity data (AD), quantifying the human activity for each of the i sectors, with the mix of j technologies (TECH) for each sector i, and with their abatement percentage by one of the k end-of-pipe (EOP) measures for each technology j, and on the other hand the country-specific emission factor (EF) for each sector i and technology j with relative reduction (RED) of the uncontrolled emission by installed abatement measure k. Emissions in are calculated by individual countries using country-specific information. The countries are organized in different world regions for illustration purposes. Emissions of some small countries are presented together with other countries depending on country definition and availability of activity statistics.
    • December 2015
      Source: Global Energy Network Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      Data for 2005 but still gives a general idea as to the status of Japan compared to other developed countries.
    • June 2016
      Source: Enerdata
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 August, 2016
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      Enerdata is an independent Research & Consulting firm on the global oil, gas, coal, power, renewable and carbon markets established in 1991. Total energy consumption - for each energy product it is the sum of primary production, external trade, marine bunkers (fuel used by boats and aircraft for international transport) and stock variations. For the world, marine bunkers are included. This induces a gap with the sum of regions. Total primary production evaluates the quantity of natural energy resources. Total balance of trade is the difference between exports and imports. The balance of a net exporter appears as a negative value (-). The balance of geographic and geopolitical zones is simply the sum of the trade balance of all the countries. The energy intensity is calculated by dividing the total energy consumption of a country by its Gross Domestic Product (GDP). It measures the total amount of energy necessary to generate one unit of GDP. GDP is expressed at constant exchange rate and purchasing power parity to remove the impact of inflation and reflect differences in general price levels and relate energy consumption to the real level of economic activity. Using purchasing power parity rates for GDP instead of exchange rates increases the value of GDP in regions with a low cost of living, and therefore decreases their energy intensities. Total energy includes coal, gas, oil, electricity, heat and biomass.
    • May 2016
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship and Development Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 August, 2016
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      Global Entrepreneurship Index provides information about global entrepreneurship subIndex ranks and scoring of all countries.It also provides information about certain indicators like attitudes,abilities and aspirations with their ranks and scores
    • March 2016
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 March, 2016
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      The GEM Adult Population Survey (APS) measures the level and nature of entrepreneurial activity around the world. It is administered to a representative national sample of at least 2000 respondents.The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.  
    • March 2016
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 March, 2016
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      The GEM National Expert Survey (NES) monitors the factors that are believed to have a significant impact on entrepreneurship, known as the Entrepreneurial Framework Conditions (EFCs). It is administered to a minimum of 36 carefully chosen 'experts' in each country. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.
    • June 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      The Global Financial Development Database is an extensive dataset of financial system characteristics for countries and group-wise economies. The database includes measures of (1) size of financial institutions and markets (financial depth), (2) degree to which individuals can and do use financial services (access), (3) efficiency of financial intermediaries and markets in intermediating resources and facilitating financial transactions (efficiency), and (4) stability of financial institutions and markets (stability). For a complete description of the dataset and a discussion of the underlying literature, see: Martin Cihák, Asli Demirgüç-Kunt, Erik Feyen, and Ross Levine, 2012. Benchmarking Financial Systems Around the World.World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 6175, World Bank, Washington, D.C. Concepts: The Kruskal-Wallis H test (sometimes also called the "one-way ANOVA on ranks") is a rank-based nonparametric test that can be used to determine if there are statistically significant differences between two or more groups of an independent variable on a continuous or ordinal dependent variable. The Z score method examines liquidity, profitability, reinvested earnings and leverage which are integrated into a single composite score. It can be used with past, current or projected data as it requires no external inputs such as GDP or Market Price. Z-Score Ratings cutoff scores used in classifications: AAA 8.15, AA 7.30, A 6.65 , BBB 5.85, BB 4.95, B 4.15, CCC 3.20, D 3.19
    • April 2015
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 June, 2015
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      The Global Financial Inclusion Database provides 800 country-level indicators of financial inclusion summarized for all adults and disaggregated by key demographic characteristics-gender, age, education, income, and rural residence. Covering more than 140 economies, the indicators of financial inclusion measure how people save, borrow, make payments and manage risk. The reference citation for the data is: Demirguc-Kunt, Asli, Leora Klapper, Dorothe Singer, and Peter Van Oudheusden. 2015. “The Global Findex Database 2014: Measuring Financial Inclusion around the World.” Policy Research Working Paper 7255, World Bank, Washington, DC. Note: 1: Variable [w1] refers to 2011 variables 2: Variable [w2] refers to 2014 variables 3: Variable [ts] refers to Time Series variables (2011, 2014)
    • October 2014
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 February, 2016
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      Global Financial Stability Report (GFSR) finds that six years after the start of the crisis, the global economic recovery continues to rely heavily on accommodative monetary policies in advanced economies. Monetary accommodation remains critical in supporting the economy by encouraging economic risk taking in the form of increased real spending by households and greater willingness to invest and hire by businesses. However, prolonged monetary ease may also encourage excessive financial risk taking.
    • April 2016
      Source: GFP
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 May, 2016
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      Global Firepower (GFP) provides a unique analytical display of data concerning today's world military powers. Over 1000 world powers are considering in the ranking which allows for a broad spectrum of comparisons to be achieved concerning relative military strengths. The user should note that nuclear capability is not taken into account as that would defeat the purpose of such comparisons. Instead, the GFP ranking is based strictly on each nations potential conventional war-making capabilities across land, sea and air. The final ranking also incorporates values related to resources, finances and geography. Some statistics have been estimated where official numbers are not publicly available. The GFP ranking is based on a formula utilizing over fifty different factors, compiled and measured against each nation. Bonuses (ex: low oil consumption) and penalties (ex: high oil consumption) are applied to further refine the list. The finalized GFP value is recognized as the "Power Index" (PwrIndx) which supplies a nation its respective positioning in the rankings. Note : • Nuclear capability is NOT taken into account • Geographical factors influence every country's ranking • Ranking does not solely rely on total number of weapons available • Natural resource reliance (use/production) is taken into account • Land-locked nations are NOT penalized for lack of a standing navy • Naval powers ARE penalized for limited naval capabilities • Current political/military leadership is NOT taken into account
    • June 2016
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 August, 2016
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      The Global Food Security Index 2016: An annual measure of the state of global food security, is the second edition of an Economist Intelligence Unit study, commissioned by DuPont.
    • September 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 October, 2015
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      DescriptionThe Global Forest Resources Assessment 2015 (FRA 2015) is the most comprehensive assessment of forests and forestry to date - not only in terms of the number of countries and people involved - but also in terms of scope. It examines the current status and recent trends for about 90 variables covering the extent, condition, uses and values of forests and other wooded land, with the aim of assessing all benefits from forest resources. Information has been collated from 233 countries and territories for four points in time: 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010. The results are presented according to the seven thematic elements of sustainable forest management. FAO worked closely with countries and specialists in the design and implementation of FRA 2010 - through regular contact, expert consultations, training for national correspondents and ten regional and subregional workshops. More than 900 contributors were involved, including 178 officially nominated national correspondents and their teams. The outcome is better data, a transparent reporting process and enhanced national capacity in developing countries for data analysis and reporting. The final report of FRA 2010 was published at the start of the latest biennial meeting of the FAO' Committee on Forestry and World Forest Week, in Rome.
    • November 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 December, 2016
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      This data set provides the Index benchmarks national gender gaps on economic, political, education and health criteria, and provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups. The rankings are designed to create greater awareness among a global audience of the challenges posed by gender gaps and the opportunities created by reducing them. The methodology and quantitative analysis behind the rankings are intended to serve as a basis for designing effective measures for reducing gender gaps. Score,1=No inequality, 0=Maximum inequality. Rank,1=Minimum inequality
    • September 2016
      Source: Dual Citizen LLC
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 December, 2016
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      This 5th edition of the Global Green Economy Index (GGEI) is a data-driven analysis of how 80 countries perform in the global green economy, as well as how expert practitioners rank this performance. Since its launch in 2010, the GGEI has signaled which countries are making progress towards greener economies, and which ones are not. The comparison of national green performance and perceptions of it revealed through the GGEI framework is more important than ever today. This is because while there is far greater public and political focus on climate change and green growth now than when the GGEI was first published, often the commitments and targets communicated by leaders do not match the reality. This report will provide an overview of the newest GGEI results from the 5th edition, as well as more detail on how our research and data can enrich the work of others in this space.
    • September 2016
      Source: World Health Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 December, 2016
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      The GHO data provides access to indicators on priority health topics including mortality and burden of diseases, the Millennium Development Goals (child nutrition, child health, maternal and reproductive health, immunization, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, neglected diseases, water and sanitation), non communicable diseases and risk factors, epidemic-prone diseases, health systems, environmental health, violence and injuries, equity among others
    • July 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 January, 2017
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      This Dataset contains proprietary and non-proprietary data used in the computation of the World Economic's Forum Networked Readiness Index. By making this data available, the Forum aims to inform multi-stakeholder dialogue, foster evidence-based, data-driven decisions, allow measuring progress, and support research by academia, journalists and others.
    • May 2016
      Source: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 May, 2016
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      Global Internal Displacement Database (GIDD) aims to provide comprehensive information on internal displacement worldwide. It covers all countries and territories for which IDMC has obtained data on situations of internal displacement, and provides data on situations of internal displacement associated with conflict and generalized violence (2014-2015), displacement associated with sudden-onset natural hazard-related disasters (2008-2015).
    • February 2016
      Source: Material Flows
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 June, 2016
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    • December 2015
      Source: Global Open Data Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 July, 2016
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    • June 2016
      Source: Institute for Economics and Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 July, 2016
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      The 2016 Global Peace Index overall score deteriorated slightly compared with 2015, and at a faster rate than the previous year. Once again, the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) was the region that saw its levels of peace deteriorate the most. Four regions scored worse than the previous year, while three other regions improved and two remained the same.
    • May 2014
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Kirill Kosenkov
      Accessed On: 27 August, 2015
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      Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980–2013. Comparable estimates based on systematically identified surveys, reports, and published studies (n=1769) that included data for height and weight, both through physical measurements and self-reports, using mixed effects linear regression to correct for bias in self-reports. Data for prevalence of obesity and overweight by age, sex, country, and year (n=19 244) obtained with a spatiotemporal Gaussian process regression model to estimate prevalence with 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). Research by the staff of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evalutaion with co-authors. Published online 28 May 2014, "The Lancet" Volume 384, No. 9945, p766–781. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60460-8
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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      Contains global production statistics (capture and aquaculture). This database contains the volume of aquatic species caught by country or area, by species items, by FAO major fishing areas, and year, for all commercial, industrial, recreational and subsistence purposes. The harvest from mariculture, aquaculture and other kinds of fish farming is also included
    • January 2016
      Source: A. T. Kearney
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 March, 2016
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      The Global Retail Development Index™ is an annual study that ranks the top 30 developing countries for retail expansion worldwide. The Index analyzes 25 macroeconomic and retail-specific variables to help retailers devise successful global strategies and to identify developing market investment opportunities. The GRDI is unique because it identifies today's most successful markets and those that offer the most potential for the future.
    • April 2014
      Source: United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 May, 2016
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      Intentional homicide is defined as unlawful death purposefully inflicted on a person by another person
    • December 2015
      Source: INSEAD
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 October, 2016
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      55This data presents high-level way of mapping individual countries in terms of talent competitiveness consists of comparing their GTCI scores to their GDP per capita for the selected indicators.In its first year, the GTCI model covers 103 countries,representing 86.3% of the world’s population and 96.7% of the world’s GDP (in current US dollars).It is a simplified manner of acquiring a first assessment about the ways in which competitiveness relates to overall level of economic development of a nation.
    • May 2011
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 January, 2015
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      The Global Talen Index Report: The Outlook to 2015
    • June 2016
      Source: KPMG
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 September, 2016
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      Covers data on corporate, indirect and individual income tax rates throughout 163 countries across the world during the period from 2006 to 2016. Provided by KPMG.
    • November 2016
      Source: Institute for Economics and Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2016
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      The Global Terrorism Index (GTI) is a comprehensive study which accounts for the direct and indirect impact of terrorism in 163 countries in terms of its effect on lives lost, injuries, property damage and the psychological aftereffects of terrorism. This study covers 99.6 per cent of the world’s population. It aggregates the most authoritative data source on terrorism today, the Global Terrorism Database (GTD) collated by the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) into a composite score in order to provide an ordinal ranking of nations on the negative impact of terrorism. The GTD is unique in that it consists of systematically and comprehensively coded data on domestic as well as international terrorist incidents and now includes more than 140,000 cases. Note: "Change in score values" have been calculated for 2015 by score in 2015 minus score in 2014 (Score_2015-Score_2014). For rest of the years according to source.
    • January 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 July, 2016
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    • December 2014
      Source: World Wide Web Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      The Web has changed our lives. But to harness its full benefit, we need to understand how countries and people use it, and its impact on on development and human rights. The Web Index, by the World Wide Web Foundation, tracks the Web’s contribution to social, economic and political progress across 86 countries. It ranks these nations across four pillars: Universal Access, Freedom and Openness, Empowerment and Relevant Content.
    • April 2014
      Source: Center for Strategic and International Studies
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 February, 2015
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      The Global Youth Wellbeing Index details the performance and provides comparative analysis of 30 countries in terms of overall youth wellbeing and within six domains. The Index is designed to facilitate both thought and action by elevating youth needs and opportunities and young people’s participation on national and global agendas. It also provides public and private sector decision-makers an easier way to understand the big picture, guide actions and investments, and drive progress over time.
    • July 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 September, 2016
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      This table is a compilation of statistics of trade in goods and services as reported in the Balance of Payments. The conceptual framework used for the compilation is based on the IMF Balance of Payments Manual (BPM5, 1993).
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2016
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      This table shows exports, imports and sum/average of exports and imports as percentage of nominal gross domestic product (GDP). The indicators are calculated for trade in goods, trade in services and total trade in goods and services.
    • August 2014
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 August, 2014
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      This table shows indicators of trade balances as the following: - Normalized trade balance, - Trade balance as percentage of imports and, - Trade balance as percentage of nominal gross domestic product (GDP).
    • August 2014
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 August, 2014
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      This table shows exports, imports and sum/average of exports and imports as percentage of nominal gross domestic product (GDP). The indicators are calculated for trade in goods, trade in services and total trade in goods and services.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 March, 2016
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      Key statistical concept Although there are clear definitions for all the terms used in this survey, countries might have different methodologies to calculate tonne-kilometer and passenger-kilometers. Methods could be based on traffic or mobility surveys, use very different sampling methods and estimating techniques which could affect the comparability of their statistics. Also, if the definition on road fatalities is very clear and well applied by most coutries, this is not the case for road injuies. Indeed, not only countries might have different definitions but the important underreporting of road injuries in most countries can distort analysis based on these data.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
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      This dataset contains selected indicators for monitoring progress towards green growth to support policy making and inform the public at large. The indicator bring together the OECD's statistics, indicators and measures of progress. The dataset covers OECD countries as well as BRIICS economies (Brazil, Russian Federation, India, Indonesia, China and South Africa), and selected countries when possible. The indicators are selected according to well specified criteria and embedded in a conceptual framework, which is structured around four groups to capture the main features of green growth: Environmental and resource productivity, to indicate whether economic growth is becoming greener with more efficient use of natural capital and to capture aspects of production which are rarely quantified in economic models and accounting frameworks; The natural asset base, to indicate the risks to growth from a declining natural asset base; Environmental quality of life, to indicate how environmental conditions affect the quality of life and wellbeing of people; Economic opportunities and policy responses, to indicate the effectiveness ofpolicies in delivering green growth and describe the societal responses needed to secure business and employment opportunities.
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 October, 2016
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      This dataset presents trends in man-made emissions of major greenhouse gases and emissions by gas. Data refer to total emissions of CO2 (emissions from energy use and industrial processes, e.g. cement production), CH4 (methane emissions from solid waste, livestock, mining of hard coal and lignite, rice paddies, agriculture and leaks from natural gas pipelines), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). When interpreting these data it should be kept in mind that they refer to gross direct emissions excluding emissions or removals from land-use change and forestry (LULUCF). This dataset presents trends in man-made emissions of major greenhouse gases and emissions by gas. Data refer to total emissions of CO2 (emissions from energy use and industrial processes, e.g. cement production), CH4 (methane emissions from solid waste, livestock, mining of hard coal and lignite, rice paddies, agriculture and leaks from natural gas pipelines), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). When interpreting these data it should be kept in mind that they refer to gross direct emissions excluding emissions or removals from land-use change and forestry (LULUCF).
    • September 2014
      Source: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 September, 2014
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      Note 1: The reporting and review requirements for GHG inventories are different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. The definition format of data for emissions/removals from the forestry sector is different for Annex I and non-Annex I Parties. Note 2: Base year data in the data interface relate to the base year under the Climate Change Convention (UNFCCC). The base year under the Convention is defined slightly different than the base year under the Kyoto Protocol. An exception is made for European Union (15) whereby the base year under the Kyoto Protocol is displayed.
    • January 2015
      Source: University of Groningen
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 February, 2016
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      The GGDC 10-Sector Database provides a long-run internationally comparable dataset on sectoral productivity performance in Asia, Europe, Latin America and the US. Variables covered in the data set are annual series of value added, output deflators, and persons employed for 10 broad sectors. It gives sectoral detail to the historical macro data in Maddison (2003) from 1950 onwards. It consists of series for 10 countries in Asia, 9 in Latin-America and 9 in Europe and the US. The data for Asia and Latin-America are based on Marcel P. Timmer and Gaaitzen J. de Vries (2007), 'A Cross-Country Database For Sectoral Employment And Productivity In Asia And Latin America, 1950-2005', GGDC Research memorandum GD-98, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, August 2007. Data for Europe and the US is based on an update of Bart van Ark (1996), Sectoral Growth Accounting and Structural Change in Post-War Europe, in B. van Ark and N.F.R. Crafts, eds., Quantitative Aspects of Post-War European Economic Growth, CEPR/Cambridge University Press, pp. 84-164. All series derived from this database need to be referred to as: "Timmer, Marcel P. and Gaaitzen J. de Vries (2009), "Structural Change and Growth Accelerations in Asia and Latin America: A New Sectoral Data Set" Cliometrica, vol 3 (issue 2) pp. 165-190."
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 July, 2016
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      This table contains research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics on gross domestic R&D expenditure by sector of performance (business enterprise, government, higher education, private non-profit, and total intramural) and by field of science (natural sciences, engineering, medical sciences, agricultural sciences, social sciences, and humanities). Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2010 prices and PPPs).
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 April, 2016
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      Unit of measure used Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents data on Gross domestic expenditure on R&D (GERD) by socio-economic objective (SEO), using the NABS 2007 classification i.e.: Exploration and exploitation of the Earth, Environment, Exploration and exploitation of space, Transport, telecommunication and other infrastructures, Energy, Industrial production and technology, Health, Agriculture, Education, Culture, recreation, religion and mass media, Political and social systems, structures and processes, General advancement of knowledge, and Defence. Please note that in this new NABS 2007 classification, the three socio-economic objectives -- Education, Culture, recreation, religion and mass media, and Political and social systems, structures and processes -- were previously grouped under a single objective: Social structures and relationships. At the time of this publication there is no breakdown of historical data into the three new SEOs. Another issue relating to the transition from NABS 1993 to NABS 2007 is that what was formerly Other civil research is now to be distributed among the other chapters. This distribution has not yet been done in this database. Therefore, until the countries are in a position to provide breakdown according to the NABS 2007 classification, in some cases GERD by SEO is greater than the sum of its chapters.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 June, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table contains research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics. Data include gross domestic R&D expenditure by sector of performance (business enterprise, government, higher education, private non-profit, and total intramural) and by source of funds (business enterprise, government - including public general university funds -, higher education, private non-profit and funds from abroad - including funds from enterprises and other funds from abroad).
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs). Variables collected This table presents research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics. Data include gross domestic R&D expenditure by sector of performance (business enterprise, government, higher education, private non-profit, and total intramural) and by type of costs (current expenditures: labour costs, other current costs; and capital expenditures: land and buildings, and instruments and equipment).
    • January 2016
      Source: National Science Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 April, 2016
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      Data collected from table 4-12,4-15
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 January, 2017
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      National accounts are a coherent set of macroeconomic indicators, which provide an overall picture of the economic situation and are widely used for economic analysis and forecasting, policy design and policy making. The data presented in this collection are the results of a pilot exercise on the sharing selected main GDP aggregates, population and employment data collected by different international organisations. It wasconducted by the Task Force in International Data Collection (TFIDC) which was established by the  Inter-Agency Group on Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).  The goal of this pilot is to develop a set of commonly shared principles and working arrangements for data cooperation that could be implemented by the international agencies. The data sets are an experimental exercise to present national accounts data form various countries across the globe in one coherent folder, but users should be aware that these data are collected and validated by different organisations and not fully harmonised from a methodological point of view.  The domain consists of the following collections:
    • October 2015
      Source: bq magazine
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 April, 2016
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      Gulf Dataset 2015 includes below Topics. 1. The Arab World Online 2014: Trends in Internet and Mobile Usage in the Arab Region http://img.b8cdn.com/images/uploads/article_docs/en_gip-mbrsg_bayt_internet_final_20422_EN.pdf 2. Just Falafel Index 2015: Given the popularity and convenience of the Big Mac Index by The Economist, bqdoha.com devised a similar, but more local, solution/version for currency valuation. http://www.bq-magazine.com/magazine-content/2015/01/just-falafel-index 3. CO2 emissions in GCC countries 2014 http://www.bq-magazine.com/gcc-illustrated/2014/08/co2-emissions-gcc-countries 4. Satisfaction with access to quality healthcare in the GCC http://www.bq-magazine.com/gcc-illustrated/2014/07/healthcare-access-gcc
  • H
    • November 2016
      Source: Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism, State of Hawaii
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 January, 2017
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    • December 2014
      Source: Economist Intelligence Unit
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 January, 2015
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      Over the past decade or more, there have been several efforts to find out which are the world’s best-performing healthcare systems. The pioneer was the World Health Organisation (WHO), which used its annual World Health Report in 2000 to perform a systematic global analysis. The work that The Economist Intelligence Unit has previously carried out in the area of value-based healthcare has made it clear that value is a vexed term
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 November, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.B1:B4
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • October 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • December 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 December, 2016
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      The World Bank Health Nutrition and Population Statistics Provides key health, nutrition and population statistics gathered from a variety of international sources. Themes include population dynamics, nutrition, reproductive health, health financing, medical resources and usage, immunization, infectious diseases, HIV/AIDS, DALY, population projections and lending. HNPStats also includes health, nutrition and population statistics by wealth quintiles.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: ClinicalTrials.gov
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2016
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      ClinicalTrials.gov currently lists 233,365 studies with locations in all 50 States and in 195 countries. As of October 2015, ClinicalTrials.gov receives an average of more than 207 million page views per month and 65,000 unique visitors daily.
    • September 2015
      Source: World Organisation for Animal Health
      Uploaded by: Kirill Kosenkov
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2015
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      The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) data on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Animals (HPAI, informally known as bird flu). Number of outbreaks, total susceptible animals & animals destroyed and other stats by country.
    • May 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 October, 2016
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      The Historical Public Debt Database contains unbalanced panel data on Gross Domestic Product Gross Government Debt and Gross Government Debt-to-GDP Ratio for 187 countries. The series spans the years 1800 through 2015 although each country’s data depends on its date of independence and data availability. The database was constructed by bringing together a number of other datasets and information from original sources. For the most recent years the data are linked to the IMF World Economic Outlook (WEO) database to facilitate regular updates.
    • December 2010
      Source: Maddison Project
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Historical Statistics on Population, GDP and Per Capita GDP for 1-2008 AD period. Copyright Angus Maddison.
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 December, 2015
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      The Human Development Report presents a wealth of statistical information on different aspects of human development
  • I
    • January 2008
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 September, 2014
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      ICT goods are those that are either intended to fulfil the function of information processing and communication by electronic means, including transmission and display, OR which use electronic processing to detect, measure and/or record physical phenomena, or to control a physical process. ICT goods are defined by the OECD in terms of the Harmonised System.The guiding principle for the delineation of ICT goods is that such goods must either be intended to fulfil the function of information processing and communication by electronic means, including transmission and display, OR use electronic processing to detect, measure and/or record physical phenomena, or to control a physical process.Another guiding principle was to use existing classification systems in order to take advantage of existing data sets and therefore ensure the immediate use of the proposed standard. In this case, the underlying system is the Harmonized System (HS). The HS is the only commodity classification system used on a sufficiently wide basis to support international data comparison. A large number of countries use it to classify export and import of goods, and many countries use it (or a classification derived from or linked to it) to categorise domestic outputs.The application of the ICT product definition to selection of in-scope HS categories is a somewhat subjective exercise. The fact that the HS is not built on the basis of the functionality of products makes it much more difficult. The distinction between products which fulfil those functions and products that simply embody electronics but fundamentally fulfil other functions is not always obvious.It is possible to adopt a narrow or broad interpretation of the guideline, though the OECD chose a broader interpretation, an approach which is consistent with that adopted to develop the ICT sector definition.
    • September 2016
      Source: International Centre for Tax and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2016
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      A major obstacle to cross-country research on the role of revenue and taxation in development has been the weakness of available data. Government Revenue Dataset (GRD), developed through the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD), is aimed at overcoming this obstacle. It meticulously combines data from several major international databases, as well as drawing on data compiled from all available International Monetary Fund (IMF) Article IV reports. It achieves marked improvements in data coverage and accuracy, including a standardized approach to revenue from natural resources, and holds the promise of significant improvement in the credibility and robustness of research in this area. Dataset contains Central, General and merged government revenue data reported as % of GDP.
    • November 2016
      Source: International Energy Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2016
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    • November 2015
      Source: International Energy Agency
      Uploaded by: Kirill Kosenkov
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2015
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      The annual World Energy Outlook (WEO) is the world’s most authoritative source of energy market analysis and projections, providing critical analytical insights into trends in energy demand and supply and what they mean for energy security, environmental protection and economic development. The WEO projections are used by the public and private sector as a framework on which they can base their policy-making, planning and investment decisions and to identify what needs to be done to arrive at a supportable and sustainable energy future.
    • February 2011
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      IHME results from paper, Worldwide mortality in men and women aged 15–59 years from 1970 to 2010: a systematic analysis, published online in The Lancet on April 30 2010. This dataset provides global estimates of adult mortality risk, 45q15 (probability of death between the ages of 15 years and 60 years), between 1970 and 2010.
    • February 2011
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      IHME results from paper, Neonatal, post neonatal, childhood, and under-5 mortality for 187 countries, 1970-2010: a systematic analysis of progress towards Millennium Development Goal 4, published online in The Lancet on May 24 2010. This dataset provides estimates of neonatal, post neonatal, childhood, and under-5 mortality for 187 countries between 1970 and 2010.
    • December 2010
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 July, 2013
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      IHME research, published online in The Lancet in April 2010, with data from a global assessment of levels and trends in maternal mortality for the years 1980-2008. The study, Maternal mortality for 181 countries, 1980-2008: a systematic analysis of progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5, provides global, regional, and national level estimates of the maternal mortality ratio (MMR - the number of maternal deaths per 100,000 live births) as well as the number of maternal deaths.
    • September 2011
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      IHME results data from global analysis of maternal mortality for years 1990-2011 published online in The Lancet in September 2011. The study, Progress towards Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 on maternal and child mortality: an updated systematic analysis, provides global and country level estimates of the maternal mortality ratio (MMR - the number of maternal deaths per 100,000 live births) and the number of maternal deaths.
    • December 2010
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      IHME results from paper, Public financing of health in developing countries: a cross-national systematic analysis published in The Lancet in April 2010. This dataset provides estimates on domestically financed government health expenditures in developing countries and development assistance for health (DAH) to governmental and non-governmental recipients from 1995 to 2006.
    • May 2014
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 August, 2014
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      This Dataset Covering 187 countries including most low-income countries, the toolkit provides indicators on export product diversification and export product quality from 1962-2010.
    • April 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 June, 2015
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      Despite progress in addressing key fiscal weaknesses in many countries, significant policy challenges remain in advanced, emerging, and low-income economies, and must be faced in an environment where downside risks to growth have increased. Many advanced economies face very large adjustment needs to reduce risks related to high debt ratios. The appropriate pace of adjustment in the short run will depend, for each country, on the intensity of the market pressure it confronts, the magnitude of the risks to growth it faces, and the credibility of its medium-term program. The euro area needs to sustain fiscal consolidation, minimize its growth fallout, and address concerns about the adequacy of crisis resolution mechanisms. In Japan and the United States, sufficiently detailed and ambitious plans to reduce deficits and debts are needed to prevent credibility from weakening. Meanwhile, many emerging economies need to make faster progress in strengthening fiscal fundamentals before cyclical factors or spillovers from advanced economies turn against them. Low-income countries also need to rebuild fiscal buffers, while addressing spending needs.
    • December 2014
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 December, 2016
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      The Government Finance Statistics  http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/gfs/manual/aboutgfs.htm
    • October 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 October, 2016
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      The World Economic Outlook (WEO) database contains selected macroeconomic data series from the statistical appendix of the World Economic Outlook report, which presents the IMF staff's analysis and projections of economic developments at the global level, in major country groups and in many individual countries. The WEO is released in April and September/October each year. Use this database to find data on national accounts, inflation, unemployment rates, balance of payments, fiscal indicators, trade for countries and country groups (aggregates), and commodity prices whose data are reported by the IMF. Data are available from 1980 to the present, and projections are given for the next two years. Additionally, medium-term projections are available for selected indicators. For some countries, data are incomplete or unavailable for certain years. October 2016 No changes have been introduced for the October 2016 World Economic Outlook database.
    • August 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 August, 2014
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      This database contains information on several demographic and labour market characteristics of the population of 28 OECD countries around the year 2000, by country of birth. The OECD countries included are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Most of the thematic files of the database include three core variables: the country of residence, the country of birth and educational attainment. Other variables available in the database include age, gender, citizenship, duration of stay, labour force status, occupation, sector of activity and field of study. In general, the database covers all individuals aged 15 and older.
    • August 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 August, 2014
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      This database contains information on several demographic and labour market characteristics of the population of 28 OECD countries around the year 2000, by country of birth. The OECD countries included are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Most of the thematic files of the database include three core variables: the country of residence, the country of birth and educational attainment. Other variables available in the database include age, gender, citizenship, duration of stay, labour force status, occupation, sector of activity and field of study. In general, the database covers all individuals aged 15 and older.
    • August 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 August, 2014
      Select Dataset
      This database contains information on several demographic and labour market characteristics of the population of 28 OECD countries around the year 2000, by country of birth. The OECD countries included are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Most of the thematic files of the database include three core variables: the country of residence, the country of birth and educational attainment. Other variables available in the database include age, gender, citizenship, duration of stay, labour force status, occupation, sector of activity and field of study. In general, the database covers all individuals aged 15 and older with a tertiary education.
    • August 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 August, 2014
      Select Dataset
      This database contains information on several demographic and labour market characteristics of the population of 28 OECD countries around the year 2000, by country of birth. The OECD countries included are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Most of the thematic files of the database include three core variables: the country of residence, the country of birth and educational attainment. Other variables available in the database include age, gender, citizenship, duration of stay, labour force status, occupation, sector of activity and field of study. In general, the database covers all individuals aged 15 and older.
    • August 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 August, 2014
      Select Dataset
      This database contains information on several demographic and labour market characteristics of the population of 28 OECD countries around the year 2000, by country of birth. The OECD countries included are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Most of the thematic files of the database include three core variables: the country of residence, the country of birth and educational attainment. Other variables available in the database include age, gender, citizenship, duration of stay, labour force status, occupation, sector of activity and field of study. In general, the database covers all individuals aged 15 and older.
    • July 2015
      Source: General Directorate of Statistics, Honduras
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 June, 2016
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    • June 2016
      Source: U.S. Department of Homeland Security
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 September, 2016
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    • February 2004
      Source: General Directorate of Statistics and National Accounts, Equatorial Guinea
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 June, 2013
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    • January 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 October, 2016
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    • January 2016
      Source: Heritage Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 February, 2016
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      Economic freedom is the fundamental right of every human to control his or her own labor and property. In an economically free society, individuals are free to work, produce, consume, and invest in any way they please, with that freedom both protected by the state and unconstrained by the state. In economically free societies, governments allow labor, capital and goods to move freely, and refrain from coercion or constraint of liberty beyond the extent necessary to protect and maintain liberty itself.
    • October 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2016
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      Nominal effective series measure changes in the value of a currency against a trade-weighted basket of currencies. A rise in the index means a strengthening of the currency. Real effective series are a measure of the change in competitiveness of a country, by taking into account the change in costs or prices relative to other countries. A rise in the index means a loss of competitiveness. The collection comprises the series 'Industrial countries' effective exchange rates including New Member States'. The series 'Industrial countries' effective exchange rates excluding New Member States' is no longer updated and may be found in the collection 'Exchange rates: historical data'.
    • October 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2016
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      Nominal effective series measure changes in the value of a currency against a trade-weighted basket of currencies. A rise in the index means a strengthening of the currency. Real effective series are a measure of the change in competitiveness of a country, by taking into account the change in costs or prices relative to other countries. A rise in the index means a loss of competitiveness. The collection comprises the series 'Industrial countries' effective exchange rates including New Member States'. The series 'Industrial countries' effective exchange rates excluding New Member States' is no longer updated and may be found in the collection 'Exchange rates: historical data'.
    • October 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 October, 2016
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      Nominal effective series measure changes in the value of a currency against a trade-weighted basket of currencies. A rise in the index means a strengthening of the currency. Real effective series are a measure of the change in competitiveness of a country, by taking into account the change in costs or prices relative to other countries. A rise in the index means a loss of competitiveness. The collection comprises the series 'Industrial countries' effective exchange rates including New Member States'. The series 'Industrial countries' effective exchange rates excluding New Member States' is no longer updated and may be found in the collection 'Exchange rates: historical data'.
    • April 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 July, 2016
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      Eurostat's database covers 1) Production and trade in roundwood and wood products, including primary and secondary products 2) Economic data on forestry and logging, including employment data 3) Sustainable forest management, comprising forest resources (assets) and environmental data. The main types of primary forest products included in (1) are: roundwood, sawnwood, wood-based panels, pulp, and paper and paperboard. Secondary products include further processed wood and paper products. These products are presented in greater detail; definitions are available. All of the data are compiled from the Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire (JFSQ), except for table (e), which is directly extracted from Eurostat's international trade database COMEXT (HS/CN Chapter 44). The tables in (1) cover details of the following topics: - Roundwood removals and production by type of wood and assortment (a) - Roundwood production by type of ownership (b) - Production and trade in roundwood, fuelwood and other basic products (c) - Trade in industrial roundwood by assortment and species (d) - Tropical wood imports to the EU from Chapter 44 of the Harmonised System (e) - Production and trade in sawnwood, panels and other primary products (f) - Sawnwood trade by species (g) - Production and trade in pulp and paper & paperboard (h) - Trade in secondary wood and paper products (i) Data in (2) include the output, intermediate consumption, gross value added, fixed capital consumption, gross fixed capital formation and different measures of income of forestry and logging.  The data are in current basic prices and are compatible with National Accounts. They are collected as part of Intergrated environmental and economic accounting for forests (IEEAF), which also covers labour input in annual work units (AWU).  Under (2), two separate tables cover the number of employees of forestry and logging, the manufacture of wood and products of wood and cork, and the manufacture of paper and paper products, as estimated from the Labour Force Survey results. There are two separate tables because of the change in the EU's classification of economic activities from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 in 2008. More detailed information on wood products and accounting, including definitions and questionnaires, can be found on our open-access communication platform under the interest group 'Forestry statistics and accounts'.  Data in (3) are not collected by Eurostat, but by the FAO, UNECE, Forest Euope, the European Commission's departments for Environment and the Joint Research Centre. They include forest area, wood volume, defoliation on sample plots, fires and areas with protective functions.
    • July 2016
      Source: United Nations Industrial Development Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 August, 2016
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      The UNIDO Industrial Statistics Database at the 4-digit level of ISIC (INDSTAT4) contains highly disaggregated data on the manufacturing sector for the period 1990 onwards. Comparability of data over time and across the countries has been the main priority of developing and updating this database. INDSTAT4 offers a unique possibility of in-depth analysis of the structural transformation of economies over time. The database contains seven principle indicators of industrial statistics. The data are arranged at the 3- and 4-digit level of the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities (ISIC) Revision 3 and 4 pertaining to the manufacturing, which comprises more than 150 manufacturing sectors and sub-sectors.   Note: Value added and Employnment indicators were extracted from   http://www.unido.org/Data1/IndStatBrief/E_Employement_Wages_and_Employment_Share_per_Sector.cfm?print=no&ttype=C4&Country=ALB&sortBy=&sortDir=&Group=
    • January 2014
      Source: Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Saudi Arabia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2014
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      Industry and Trade Statistics of Saudi Arabia, 2011
    • July 2016
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 November, 2016
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    • March 2016
      Source: UNESCO Institute for Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 March, 2016
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    • October 2010
      Source: Japan Apparel Technology and Research Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 August, 2016
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      The Japan Apparel Industrial Association
    • March 2016
      Source: UNESCO Institute for Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 March, 2016
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    • December 2014
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 September, 2015
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      Fertilizer prices paid by farmers are shown in local currency per metric tonne of plant nutrients (N, P2O5 and K2O) for straight fertilizers and per metric tonne of product for mixed and complex fertilizers. They generally refer to bagged fertilizers. Prices are shown with subsidies deducted wherever possible. Caution should be exercised in intercountry comparisons since pricing points, price policies, credit arrangements, etc. are not uniform.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 June, 2016
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      These data are part of a larger database, hosted on a different website, which includes both quantitative and qualitative data, as well as graphs.
    • July 2014
      Source: Lesotho Tourism Development Corporation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 April, 2016
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      This report is a regular publication of the Lesotho Tourism Development Corporation that aims to provide trends for international arrivals to Lesotho and presents the analysis of international tourists’ arrivals to Lesotho.The analysis of International visitor arrivals to Lesotho includes; total number of arrivals to Lesotho recorded from 10 ports in a year and month, purpose of visit, mode of transport to Lesotho, how long visitors stay and country of residence. The data presented in this report was gathered from 10 ports of entry namely, Caledon’spoort, Moshoeshoe I International Airport, Vanroyeen’s Gate, Maputsoe Bridge, Sani Pass Border Post, Peka Bridge, Tele Bridge, Makhaleng Bridge, Qacha’s Nek Bridge and Maseru Bridge.
    • December 2015
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 March, 2016
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      Purchasing Power Parities and the Real Size of World Economies. A Comprehensive Report of the 2011 International Comparison Program
    • June 2015
      Source: Barro-Lee
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 September, 2015
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      The Barro-Lee Data set (2010) extends their previous estimates from 1950 to 2010, and provide more, improved data disaggregated by sex and and by 5-year age intervals. It provides educational attainment data for 146 countries in 5-year intervals from 1950 to 2010 as well as information about the distribution of educational attainment of the adult population over age 15 and over age 25 by sex at seven levels of schooling. Average years of schooling at all levels are also measured for each country and for regions in the world. Note: Cited at Barro, Robert and Jong-Wha Lee, April 2010, "A New Data Set of Educational Attainment in the World, 1950-2010." NBER Working Paper No. 15902
    • January 2017
      Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 January, 2017
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    • May 2016
      Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 May, 2016
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      Data by country, region, for 217 countries including total and crude oil production, oil consumption, natural gas production and consumption, coal production and consumption, electricity generation and consumption, primary energy, energy intensity, CO2 emissions and imports and exports for all fuels.
    • August 2014
      Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 September, 2015
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      This data set contains estimates of total and marginal budget shares and income and price elasticities for nine broad consumption groups and eight food subgroups across 144 countries. Total and marginal budget shares and income and price elasticities are estimated using 2005 International Comparison Program (ICP) data, which is maintained by the ICP Development Data Group of the World Bank
    • July 2012
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 July, 2012
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      Notes: Eurostat Hierarchy: Economy and finance > Balance of payments - International transactions (bop) > Balance of payments of the EU institutions (bop_euins).
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 August, 2016
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      The estimates are based on official statistics on the foreign-born or the foreign population, classified by sex, and age. Most of the statistics utilised to estimate the international migrant stock were obtained from population censuses. Additionally, population registers and nationally representative surveys provided information on the number and composition of international migrants.
    • April 2014
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      The estimates are based on official statistics on the foreign-born or the foreign population, classified by sex, and age. Most of the statistics utilised to estimate the international migrant stock were obtained from population censuses. Additionally, population registers and nationally representative surveys provided information on the number and composition of international migrants.
    • January 2006
      Source: Walter G. Park
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
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      International patent protection: 1960–2005 Walter G. Park ∗ Department of Economics, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA Received 24 October 2007; received in revised form 14 December 2007; accepted 29 January 2008 Available online 10 March 2008 http://fs2.american.edu/wgp/www/res_policy08.pdf
    • January 2017
      Source: Property Rights Alliance
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 January, 2017
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      In order to make it possible to defend both physical and intellectual property rights of people, the Property Rights Alliance developed an instrument allowing comparison between the nations by relative strengths of property rights they provide for their citizens. This instrument, the International Property Rights Index, is published since 2007 helping policymakers to make better decisions. The Index comprises 130 countries, comparing them by three core variables, that affect the resulting index, namely country's legal and political environment, recognition and enforcement of physical and intellectual property rights.The overall grading scale of the IPRI ranges from 0 to 10, where 10 is the highest value for a property rights system and 0 is the lowest value (i.e. most negative) for a property rights system within a country..
    • December 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 December, 2016
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      The Data Template on International Reserves and Foreign Currency Liquidity is an innovative single framework that integrates the concept of international reserves and foreign currency liquidity by covering data on on-balance-sheet and off-balance-sheet international financial activities of country authorities as well as supplementary information. It aims to provide a comprehensive account of official foreign currency assets and drains on such resources arising from various foreign/domestic currency liabilities and commitments of the authorities.
    • June 2013
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 July, 2013
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      Time series on international reserves (including gold), by individual country, expressed in millions of dollars. It further presents the number of months of merchandise imports that these reserves could finance at current imports level, as well as annual changes in total reserves.
    • March 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 March, 2016
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      Re-dissemination of IMF member countries' data on international reserves and foreign currency liquidity in a common template and in a common currency (the U.S. dollar).
    • March 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 April, 2016
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      Re-dissemination of IMF member countries' data on international reserves and foreign currency liquidity in a common template and in a common currency (the U.S. dollar).
    • November 2016
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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      As a United Nations agency, the ITU has an obligation to identify, define, and produce statistics covering its sector - the telecommunication/ICT sector. This is in line with other specialized agencies that publish statistics covering their respective field of operations and forms part of the global statistical system of the UN. The collection of over 100 telecommunication/ICT indicators is one of the main activities of the unit. The ITU's Market Information and Statistics (STAT) Division collects its Telecommunication/ICT data directly form governments by means of an annual questionnaire that is sent to the government agency in charge of telecommunications/ICT. This is usually the Ministry or the regulatory agency. The STAT Division verifies and harmonizes data, carries out research, and collects missing values from government web sites and operators' annual reports, particularly for countries that do not reply to the questionnaire. Market research data are also used to cross-check and complement missing values.
    • January 2015
      Source: Ministry of Tourism, Government of India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 May, 2016
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    • November 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 January, 2017
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      The International Trade (MEI) dataset contains predominantly monthly merchandise trade statistics, and associated statistical methodological information, for the 34 OECD member countries and for all non-OECD G20 economies and the EU. The dataset itself contains international trade statistics measured in billions of United States dollars (USD) for: Exports, Imports, Balance. In all cases a lot of effort has been made to ensure that the data are internationally comparable across all countries presented and that all the subjects have good historical time-series’ data to aid with analysis.
    • October 2016
      Source: German Chemicals Industry Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 April, 2016
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      Source: From PDF Page No: 119 to 172
    • April 2014
      Source: Federal Communications Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 April, 2016
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    • September 2016
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2016
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    • October 2015
      Source: Water FootPrint Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 October, 2015
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    • March 2016
      Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 September, 2016
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      The mission of the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) is to provide the public with a reliable and convenient reporting mechanism to submit information to the FBI concerning suspected Internet-facilitated criminal activity and to develop effective alliances with industry partners. Information is processed for investigative and intelligence purposes for law enforcement and public awareness.
    • April 2016
      Source: Symantec
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2016
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      Symantec has established the most comprehensive source of Internet threat data in the world through the Symantec™ Global Intelligence Network, which is made up of more than 57.6 million attack sensors and records thousands of events per second. This network monitors threat activity in over 157 countries and territories through a combination of Symantec products and services such as Symantec DeepSight™ Intelligence, Symantec™ Managed Security Services, Norton™ consumer products, and other third-party data sources.
    • November 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 November, 2016
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      Internet users are individuals who have used the Internet (from any location) in the last 12 months. Internet can be used via a computer, mobile phone, personal digital assistant, games machine, digital TV etc.
    • December 2012
      Source: Internet World Stats
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 September, 2013
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      Internet World Stats is an International website that features up to date world Internet Usage, Population Statistics, Travel Stats and Internet Market Research Data, for over 233 individual countries and world regions.
    • February 2016
      Source: Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 February, 2016
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      The investigation was conducted using a series of six one-week “snapshot” surveys from 12 May to 29 June 2008, in each country.
    • June 2012
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2015
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      The FAO Statistics Division has compiled an updated dataset series of capital stock in Agriculture from 1975-2007 using 2005 constant prices as the base year. The dataset on capital stock in agriculture are important for analyzing a number of policy issues related to sustainable growth of agriculture and achieving food security.
    • December 2006
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 December, 2016
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    • December 2011
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2015
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    • December 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 March, 2016
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      This dataset provides comprehensive data for investment and capital stock for the general government, private sector and public-private partnerships, across the Fund member countries.
    • November 2016
      Source: Investment Company Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 July, 2016
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      This table contains figures on affiliates under foreign control by investing country in the total manufacturing, total services and total business enterprise sectors.
    • August 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 July, 2016
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      The units used to present data in AFA are millions of national currency for monetary variables and units for the other variables. Monetary variables are in current prices. Euro-area countries: national currency data is expressed in euro beginning with the year of entry into the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). For years prior to the year of entry into EMU, data have been converted from the former national currency using the appropriate irrevocable conversion rate. This presentation facilitates comparisons within a country over time and ensures that the historical evolution is preserved. Please note, however, that pre-EMU euro are a notional unit and should not be used to form area aggregates or to carry out cross-country comparisons.
    • October 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2016
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      This table contains information on foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows and outflows by individual country, geographical region and economic grouping, expressed in millions of dollars. Additional calculations present: FDI world shares, FDI values per capita, and FDI percentage ratios with respect to GDP, gross fixed capital formation (GFCF), and total exports and imports of merchandise and services. This table also contains information on foreign direct investment (FDI) inward and outward stock by individual country, geographical region and economic grouping, expressed in millions of dollars, as FDI world shares, as FDI values per capita, and as FDI percentage ratios with respect to GDP
    • December 2015
      Source: Ipsos Mori
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 August, 2016
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      • These are the findings of the Ipsos Perils of Perception Survey. 25,556 interviews were conducted between October 1st – October 16th 2015.• The survey was conducted in 33 countries around the world. The following countries used the Ipsos Online Panel system: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Great Britain, Turkey and the United States of America. In Ireland a telephone (CATI) methodology was used. In Serbia and Montenegro a face-to-face (CAPI) methodology was used.• Approximately 1000+ individuals were surveyed in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Serbia, Spain, Great Britain Montenegro, the Netherlands, Sweden, Norway and the United States of America. Approximately 500+ individuals were surveyed in the remaining countries.• Where results do not sum to 100, this may be due to computer rounding, multiple responses or the exclusion of don't knows or not stated responses.• Data are weighted to match the profile of the population.• For a full list of sources of actual data, please see - https://www.ipsos-mori.com/_assets/sri/perils/
  • J
    • December 2016
      Source: Japan HAM&SAUSAGE Processors Cooperative Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2017
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      Statistics about processed meat products in Japan. The data includes production volume, imports, delivered volume, etc. (Japanese only)
    • December 2016
      Source: Agriculture & Livestock Industries Corporation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 January, 2017
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      Japan : Livestock and Livestock Products, October 2016
    • December 2016
      Source: Japan Department Stores Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 January, 2017
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      Shows sales Statistics for department stores (Available only in Japanese only)
    • September 2016
      Source: Semiconductor Equipment Association of Japan
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 September, 2016
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      Quarterly amount of orders received and sales Jan 2009 to present
    • September 2016
      Source: Agriculture & Livestock Industries Corporation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 September, 2016
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      Japan : Starch Supply and Demand, 2016
    • October 2016
      Source: Agriculture & Livestock Industries Corporation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 October, 2016
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      Japan : Sugar Supply and Demand Balance, September 2016
    • September 2016
      Source: Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 September, 2016
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      Annual Report 2014 Petroleum Data in Japan. Natural Gas and Crude Oil (Annual Comodities: Production, Shipment and Inventory).
    • October 2009
      Source: Japan Apparel Technology and Research Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 August, 2016
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      The Japan Apparel Industrial Association
    • December 2016
      Source: Bearing Industry Association, Japan
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 December, 2016
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      Yearly and Monthly production, shipment value, and import/export of Bearing(Ball, Roller, Bearing unit).
    • March 2011
      Source: Japan External Trade Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 August, 2016
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      Market Reports Analytical reports on Japanese sectors categorized by industries and report titles. Section covers a wide range of products, services, business and industrial environments, regional enterprises, current market trends and more, with case studies and advice on market entry.
    • November 2016
      Source: Machine Tool Builders’ Association, Japan
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 January, 2017
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      Monthly amount of orders received of Machine Tools Jan 2009 to present.
    • December 2016
      Source: Petroleum Association of Japan
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 December, 2016
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      Monthly data on Oil Products Imports (by country) in Japan. Jan 2015 to September 2016.
    • October 2016
      Source: Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, Japan
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 January, 2017
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      consumption at household, commercial, and industrial consumption by type of gas and region; and production of gas by type of gas and region.
    • December 2015
      Source: Japanese Shipowners' Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2016
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      Yearly directory of statistics published by Japanese Shipowners' Association (JSA) with a variety of shipping facts in Japan.
    • December 2015
      Source: Japanese Shipowners' Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2016
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      Yearly directory of statistics published by Japanese Shipowners' Association (JSA) with a variety of shipping facts in Japan.
    • December 2015
      Source: Japanese Shipowners' Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2016
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      Yearly directory of statistics published by Japanese Shipowners' Association (JSA) with a variety of shipping facts in Japan.
    • December 2015
      Source: Japanese Shipowners' Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 July, 2016
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      Yearly directory of statistics published by Japanese Shipowners' Association (JSA) with a variety of shipping facts in Japan.
    • October 2016
      Source: Joint Organisations Data Initiative
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 October, 2016
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      The JODI-Gas World Database is a platform that provides access to all data reported through monthly submissions of the JODI-Gas Questionnaire by all participating countries and economies. The database is updated on a monthly basis around the 20th of each month, though there are possibilities for additional updates. Registered users are notified by e-mail alert each time the database is updated. Modelled after JODI-Oil, which features monthly oil production, consumption, stocks and trade data from over 90 countries, JODI-Gas embodies the same objective of enhancing energy data transparency, with the ultimate goal of ensuring global energy security for producers and consumers alike. JODI-Gas World Database covers: Three product categories: Natural gas in million m3 Natural gas in TJ LNG in 1000 tons Twelve flows: Production Receipts from Other Sources Total Imports LNG Total Exports LNG Total Imports through Pipeline Total Exports through Pipeline Stock Change Gross Inland Deliveries (Calculated) Statistical Difference (Calculated) Gross Inland Deliveries (Observed) Of which: Electricity and Heat Generation Closing Stocks; Data for around 80 participating countries. Historical data from January 2009: target is to release one month old data (M-1) every month for all participating countries.
    • November 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 November, 2016
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      The Joint External Debt Hub (JEDH)—jointly developed by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the World Bank (WB)—brings together external debt data and selected foreign assets from international creditor/market and national debtor sources. The JEDH replaces the Joint BIS-IMF-OECD-WB Statistics on External Debt, a website that was launched in 1999 to provide international data, mainly from creditor sources, on the external debt of developing and transition countries and territories. The data on the website are in millions USD, unless otherwise specified.
  • K
    • October 2016
      Source: Ministry of Finance, Malaysia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 November, 2016
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      Quarterly report on the Malaysian Economy.
    • January 2012
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 August, 2013
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      The World Bank’s Knowledge Assessment Methodology (KAM: www.worldbank.org/kam) is an online interactive tool that produces the Knowledge Economy Index (KEI)–an aggregate index representing a country’s or region’s overall preparedness to compete in the Knowledge Economy (KE). The KEI is based on a simple average of four subindexes, which represent the four pillars of the knowledge economy:  Economic Incentive and Institutional Regime (EIR)  Innovation and Technological Adoption  Education and Training  Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) Infrastructure The EIR comprises incentives that promote the efficient use of existing and new knowledge and the flourishing of entrepreneurship. An efficient innovation system made up of firms, research centers, universities, think tanks, consultants, and other organizations can tap into the growing stock of global knowledge, adapt it to local needs, and create new technological solutions. An educated and appropriately trained population is capable of creating, sharing, and using knowledge. A modern and accessible ICT infrastructure serves to facilitate the effective communication, dissemination, and processing of information.
  • L
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 December, 2016
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    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 April, 2016
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      Land resources are one of the four components of the natural environment: water, air, land and living resources. In this context land is both: a physical "milieu" necessary for the development of natural vegetation as well as cultivated vegetation; a resource for human activities. The data presented here give information concerning land use state and changes (e.g. agricultural land, forest land). Land area excludes area under inland water bodies (i.e. major rivers and lakes). Arable refers to all lan generally under rotation, whether for temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted only once) or meadows, or left fallow (less than five years). These data are not meant to indicate the amount of land that is potentially cultivable. Permanent crops are those that occupy land for a long period and do not have to be planted for several years after each harvest (e.g. cocoa, coffee, rubber). Land under vines and trees and shrubs producing fruits, nuts and flowers, such as roses and jasmine, is so classified, as are nurseries (except those for forest trees, which should be classified under "forests and other wooded land"). Arable and permanent crop land is defined as the sum of arable area and land under permanent crops. Permanent meadows and pastures refer to land used for five years or more to grow herbaceous forage crops, either cultivated or growing wild (wild prairie or grazing land). Forest refers to land spanning more than 0.5 hectare (0.005 km2) and a canopy cover of more than 10 percent, or trees able to reach these thresholds in situ. This includes land from which forests have been cleared but that will be reforested in the foreseeable future. This excludes woodland or forest predominantly under agricultural or urban land use and used only for recreation purposes. Other areas include built-up and related land, wet open land, and dry open land, with or without vegetation cover. Areas under inland water bodies (rivers and lakes) are excluded. The definitions used in different countries may show variations.
    • November 2013
      Source: Lao Statistics Bureau
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 December, 2013
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      Lao PDR Regional Statistics, 2013
    • May 2016
      Source: Global CCS Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 July, 2016
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      Globally, there are 15 large-scale CCS projects in operation, with a further seven under construction. The 22 projects in operation or under construction represents a doubling since the start of this decade. The total CO2 capture capacity of these 22 projects is around 40 million tonnes per annum (Mtpa). There are another 10 large-scale CCS projects at the most advanced stage of development planning, the Concept Definition (or Define) stage, with a total CO2 capture capacity of around 14 Mtpa. A further 12 large-scale CCS projects are in earlier stages of development planning (the Evaluate and Identify stages) and have a total CO2 capture capacity of around 25 Mtpa. Two large-scale CCS projects became operational in 2015:The Quest project, located in Alberta, Canada (CO2 capture capacity of approximately 1 Mtpa) was launched in November 2015. The project, involving the manufacture of hydrogen for upgrading bitumen into synthetic crude oil, is North America’s first large-scale CCS project to store CO2 exclusively in a deep saline formation.The Uthmaniyah CO2-EOR Demonstration Project, located in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was launched in July 2015. The project is capable of capturing around 0.8 Mtpa of CO2 from the Hayiwah NGL (natural gas liquids) Recovery Plant. Two more industrial CCS projects are expected to become operational in early 2016:The Illinois Industrial CCS Project (CO2 capture capacity of 1 Mtpa) is located at the Archer Daniel Midlands corn-to-ethanol production facility in Decatur, Illinois (United States). The project, the world’s first bio-CCS project at large scale, will be the first integrated CCS project in the United States to inject CO2 into a deep saline formation at a scale of 1 Mtpa.The Abu Dhabi CCS Project (CO2 capture capacity of 0.8 Mtpa), the world’s first iron and steel project to apply CCS at large scale, will involve CO2capture from the direct reduced iron process used at the Emirates Steel plant in Abu Dhabi. Large-scale CCS projects in the power sector are now a reality, demonstrated by:The world’s first large-scale power sector CCS project – the Boundary Dam Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Canada (CO2 capture capacity of 1 Mtpa) – becoming operational in October 2014.Commissioning activities on a new-build 582 megawatt (MW) power plant beginning at the Kemper County Energy Facility in Mississippi (United States, CO2 capture capacity of 3 Mtpa) with CO2 capture expected to commence around the middle of 2016.The Petra Nova Carbon Capture Project at the W.A. Parish power plant near Houston, Texas (US, CO2 capture capacity of 1.4 Mtpa) entering construction in July 2014, with CO2 capture anticipated by the end of 2016.
    • November 2015
      Source: Legatum Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 February, 2016
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      The Prosperity Index is the only global measurement of national success based on both income and wellbeing. Our econometric analysis has identified 89 variables, which are spread across eight sub-indices. By measuring prosperity holistically we are able to identify and analyse the specific factors that contribute to the success of a country.
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2016
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      The productivity and income estimates presented in this dataset are mainly based on GDP, population and employment data from the OECD Annual National Accounts. Hours worked are sourced from the OECD Annual National Accounts, the OECD Employment Outlook and national sources. The OECD Productivity Database aims at providing users with the most comprehensive and the latest productivity estimates. The update cycle is on a rolling basis, i.e. each variable in the dataset is made publicly available as soon as it is updated in the sources databases. However, timely data issues may arise and affect individual series and/or individual countries. In particular, annual hours worked estimates from the OECD Employment Outlook are typically updated less frequently (once a year, in the summer) than series of hours worked from the OECD Annual National Accounts.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2016
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      This table contains labour force data on labour market status - population, labour force, unemployment and employment - by sex and by detailed age groups and standard age groups (15-24, 25-54, 55-64, 65+, total). Note: Population figures reported in table LFS by sex are Census-based, while the data for this table are taken from labour force surveys. Population for total age group refers to working age population (15 to 64 years).
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 October, 2016
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      This table contains the age composition (as a percentage of all ages) of the population for each labour force status - labour force, employment, unemployment - by sex. Unit of measure used - Data are expressed as percentages.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 November, 2016
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        This table contains data on labour force participation rates, employment/population ratios and unemployment rates for both the total labour force and civilian labour force by sex. There are data for both the total age group and the working age population (ages 15 to 64). This table also contains data on the share of civilian employment by sex.
    • January 2017
      Source: LMC Automotive
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 January, 2017
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      Light Vehicle Sales & Production, 2016 November
    • January 2017
      Source: LMC Automotive
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 January, 2017
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    • October 2016
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 December, 2016
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    • March 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 October, 2016
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      The Logistics Performance Index overall score reflects assessments of a country's logistics based on efficiency of the customs clearance process, quality of trade- and transport-related infrastructure, ease of arranging competitively priced shipments, quality of logistics services, ability to track and trace consignments, and frequency with which shipments reach the consignee within the scheduled time. The index ranges from 1 to 5, with a higher score representing better performance. Data are from Logistics Performance Index surveys conducted by the World Bank in partnership with academic and international institutions and private companies and individuals engaged in international logistics. 2011 round of surveys covered more than 6,000 country assessments by nearly 1,000 international freight forwarders. Respondents evaluated eight markets on six core dimensions using a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best). The markets are chosen based on the most important export and import markets of the respondent's country, random selection, and, for landlocked countries, neighboring countries that connect them with international markets. Scores for the six areas are averaged across all respondents and aggregated to a single score using principal components analysis. Details of the survey methodology and index construction methodology are in Connecting to Compete 2012: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy (2012).
    • June 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 October, 2015
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    • June 2015
      Source: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 October, 2015
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  • M
    • June 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2015
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    • January 2017
      Source: U.S. Department of the Treasury
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2017
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      The data in this table include foreign holdings of U.S. Treasury marketable and non-marketable bills, bonds, and notes reported monthly under the Treasury International Capital (TIC) reporting system. The data are collected primarily from U.S.-based custodians. Since U.S. securities held in overseas custody accounts may not be attributed to the actual owners, the data may not provide a precise accounting of individual country ownership of Treasury securities (see TIC FAQ #7 at: http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/tic/Pages/ticfaq1.aspx). -- Data for December 2011 and later include holdings of U.S. Treasury bonds and notes as reported on TIC Form SLT, "Aggregate Holdings of Long-Term Securities by U.S. and Foreign Residents.", including preliminary SLT data for the most recent month on the MFH table. -- The data before December 2011 were collected primarily from U.S.-based custodians and broker-dealers. Those data includes estimated foreign holdings of U.S. Treasury bonds and notes based on adding monthly net transactions from the TIC S Form to the holdings in the most recent annual Survey of Foreign Holdings of U.S. Securities. See footnotes 16 and 17 for details about the transition period during the 3rd and 4th quarter of 2011.
    • February 2015
      Source: National Horticulture Board, India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2015
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    • May 2016
      Source: Department of Statistics, Malaysia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 May, 2016
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      Annual statistics of Malaysia's balance of payment as time series 1955 - 2014.
    • May 2016
      Source: Department of Statistics, Malaysia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 May, 2016
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      Annual rubber statistics. (Estates, planted area, production, exports, imports, employment, domestic consumption, stocks) 2005 & 2010.
    • December 2016
      Source: Department of Statistics, Malaysia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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    • February 2016
      Source: Economic Planning Unit, Malaysia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 May, 2016
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      Selected World Indicators- Gross Domestic Products (1980 - 2015)- Inflation (1980 - 2015)- World Trade (1980 - 2015)
    • July 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 August, 2014
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      The Maritime Transport Costs (MTC)database contains data from 1991 to the most recent available year of bilateral maritime transport costs. Transport costs are available for 43 importing countries (including EU15 countries as a custom union) from 218 countries of origin at the detailed commodity (6 digit) level of the Harmonized System 1988. This dataset should only be used in conjunction with the paper Clarifying Trade Costs in Maritime Transport which outlines methodology, data coverage and caveats to its use. Key Statistical Concept Import charges represent the aggregate cost of all freight, insurance and other charges (excluding import duties) incurred in bringing the merchandise from alongside the carrier at the port of export and placing it alongside the carrier at the first port of entry in the importing country. Insurance charges are therefore included in the transport cost variables and are estimated to be approximately 1.5% of the import value of the merchandise.
    • December 2015
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 December, 2015
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    • October 2016
      Source: Melbourne Mercer
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 December, 2016
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      Melbourne Mercer Global Pension index has become an important reference point in the debate about the adequacy, sustainability and integrity of retirement systems around the world. While some countries have well-established retirement systems that have stood the test of time, others are just developing, especially those within the Asian region. Regardless, as nations and policy makers struggle with the competing needs of an ageing population and achieving an appropriate fiscal balance, our hope is that this report will provide an opportunity for debate and discussion about possible alternative strategies. The Index uses three sub-indices —adequacy, sustainability and integrity — to measure each country's retirement income system. The overall index value for each country's system represents the weighted average of the three sub-indices. The weightings used are 40 percent for the adequacy sub-index, 35 percent for the sustainability sub-index and 25 percent for the integrity sub-index. The different weightings are used to reflect the primary importance of the adequacy sub-index which represents the benefits that are currently being provided together with some important benefit design features. The integrity sub-index considers several items that influence the overall governance and operations of the system which affects the level of confidence that the citizens of each country have in their system. The data shows there is great diversity in the pension system around the world. The overall index value for Argentina is 37.7 whereas for 80.5 for Denmark in 2016.
    • January 2015
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 April, 2015
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      This table presents merchandise trade complementarity index which assesses the suitability of preferential trade agreement between two economies given the structure of one potential partners’ exports match the imports of the other potential partner. Changes over time may indicate whether the trade profiles are becoming more or less compatible.
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 December, 2016
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      This table presents merchandise trade by product based on SITC, Rev.3 commodity classification (the most detailed level is three digit), expressed in thousands of dollars
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2016
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      This table presents merchandise trade by product based on SITC, Rev.3 commodity classification (the most detailed level is three digit), expressed in thousands of dollars
    • November 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 December, 2016
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      This table presents merchandise trade by trading partner expressed in thousands of dollars
    • September 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 November, 2016
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      Data on the world merchant fleet by flag of registration and by type of ship, highlighting the group of major open-registry countries. Data are presented in thousands of dead-weight tons (DWT), as world shares, and as percentages of a ship-type in an economy's fleet. Dead weight tonnage is a measure of how much vessels can transport.
    • January 2017
      Source: Gobierno
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 January, 2017
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      Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) flows to Mexico, by country of origin, type of investment, economic sector and by state, by economic activity destination. FDI as a percentage of gross fixed capital formation. Unit: USD millions. Frequency: Quarterly. 1999-2016.
    • January 2015
      Source: Right Diagnosis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 February, 2016
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    • February 2015
      Source: U.S. Census Bureau
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 September, 2015
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    • October 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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      Migration and Remittances Factbook 2015 provides a snapshot of migration and remittances for all countries, regions and income groups of the world, compiled from available data from various sources. Please note, 2016 for INWARD is an estimate.
    • October 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 November, 2016
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      Relevant indicators drawn from the World Development Indicators, reorganized according to the goals and targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs focus the efforts of the world community on achieving significant, measurable improvements in people's lives by the year 2015: they establish targets and yardsticks for measuring development results. Gender Parity Index (GPI)= Value of indicator for Girls/ Value of indicator for Boys. For e.g GPI=School enrolment for Girls/School enrolment for Boys. A value of less than one indicates differences in favor of boys, whereas a value near one (1) indicates that parity has been more or less achieved. The greater the deviation from 1 greater the disparity is.  
    • July 2013
      Source: U.S. Geological Survey
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 August, 2013
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      The USGS Mineral Resources Program (MRP) provides scientific information for objective resource assessments and unbiased research results on mineral potential, production, consumption, and environmental effects. The MRP is the sole Federal source for this information.
    • January 2016
      Source: Numbeo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 January, 2016
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    • July 2016
      Source: Numbeo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 July, 2016
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      Price Rankings by Country of Water (1.5 liter bottle) (Markets)
    • September 2016
      Source: Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 October, 2016
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    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 November, 2016
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      These tables are a complement to the report Agricultural Policy Monitoring and Evaluation 2016 monitors agricultural policy developments in OECD member countries, and nine emerging economies: Brazil, China, Colombia, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Russia, South Africa, Ukraine and Viet Nam. The OECD uses a comprehensive system for measuring and classifying support to agriculture - the Producer and Consumer Support Estimates (PSEs and CSEs) and related indicators. They provide insight into the increasingly complex nature of agricultural policy and serve as a basis for OECD’s agricultural policy monitoring and evaluation.
    • June 2016
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 June, 2016
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    • June 1999
      Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      Monthly Temperature Anomaly time series for China, India, and the United States.
    • October 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2016
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      This table presents most favoured nation (MFN) and effectively applied import tariff rates for major categories of non-agricultural and non-fuel products by individual country (as market economies) and economic grouping (as origins), expressed in various aggregation measures: simple average, weighted average, minimum and maximum rate, etc.
    • February 2016
      Source: Pew Research Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 February, 2016
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      Notes : 2010 is Estimated Population, 2030 is Projected Population.
  • N
    • February 2014
      Source: National Institute of Statistics and Censuses, Costa Rica
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 March, 2014
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      Naional Accounts of Costa Rica, 2014
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 October, 2016
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      It presents gross capital formation, gross fixed capital formation, changes in inventories and acquisition less disposals of valuables broken down by detailed industries. Gross fixed capital formation is also available broken down by type of assets. It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to annual national accounts questionnaire. This questionnaire is designed to collect internationally comparable data according to the 1993 SNA. Unit of measure used - In national currency, in current prices and constant prices (national base year, previous year prices and OECD base year i.e. 2010). Expressed in millions. For the Euro area countries, the data in national currency for all years are calculated using the fixed conversion rates against the euro.
    • February 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 February, 2016
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      It presents gross capital formation, gross fixed capital formation, changes in inventories and acquisition less disposals of valuables broken down by detailed industries according to the classification ISIC rev.4. Gross fixed capital formation is also available broken down by type of assets. It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to annual national accounts questionnaire. This questionnaire is designed to collect internationally comparable data according to the 1993 SNA. Unit of measure used - In national currency, in current prices and constant prices (national base year, previous year prices and OECD base year i.e. 2005). Expressed in millions. For the Euro area countries, the data in national currency for all years are calculated using the fixed conversion rates against the euro.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 November, 2016
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      It presents fixed assets by activity according to the classification ISIC rev.3 and by type of product and by type of assets.  It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to annual national accounts questionnaire. This questionnaire is designed to collect internationally comparable data according to the 1993 SNA. Unit of measure used - In national currency, in current prices and constant prices (national base year and OECD base year i.e. 2010). Expressed in millions. For the Euro area countries, the data in national currency for all years are calculated using the fixed conversion rates against the euro.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2016
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      It presents the balance sheets for non financial assets by institutional sectors, for both produced assets (fixed assets, inventories, valuables) and non-produced assets (tangible and intangible).  It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to annual national accounts questionnaire. This questionnaire is designed to collect internationally comparable data according to the 1993 SNA. Unit of measure used - In national currency expressed in millions. For the Euro area countries, the data in national currency for all years are calculated using the fixed conversion rates against the euro.
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Statistics Division
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 January, 2016
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      The Economic Statistics Branch of the United Nations Statistics Division maintains this National Accounts Statistics database of main national accounts aggregates. It is the product of a global cooperation effort between the United Nations Statistics Division, international statistical agencies and the national statistical services of more than 200 countries and is in accordance with the request of the Statistical Commission that the most recent available data on national accounts of as many countries and areas as possible be published and disseminated regularly. This National Accounts Statistics database contains a complete and consistent set of time series from 1970 onwards of main national accounts aggregates for allUN Members States and all other countries and areas in the world. It is maintained and updated on the basis of annual collections of the official annual national accounts statistics supplemented by estimates of national accounts statistics for those years and countries for which the official statistics has incomplete or inconsistent information. In addition, to the values of national accounts statistics, it contains analytical indicators and ratios derived from the main national accounts aggregates related to economic structure and development.
    • October 2015
      Source: United Nations Statistics Division
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 April, 2016
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      The Economic Statistics Branch of the United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD) maintains and annually updates the National Accounts Official Country Data database. This work is carried out in accordance with the recommendation of the Statistical Commission at its first session that the Statistics Division of the United Nations should publish regularly the most recent available data on national accounts for as many countries and areas as possible. The database contains detailed official national accounts statistics in national currencies as provided by the National Statistical Offices.Data are available for most of the countries or areas of the world and form a valuable source of information on their economies. The database contains data as far back as 1946, up to the year t-1, with data for most countries available from the 1970s. The database covers not only national accounts main aggregates such as gross domestic product, national income, saving, value added by industry and household and government consumption expenditure and its relationships; but also detailed statistics for institutional sectors (including the rest of the world), comprising the production account, the generation of income account, the allocation of primary income account, the secondary distribution of income account, the use of disposable income account, the capital account and the financial account, if they are compiled by countries.The statistics for each country or area are presented according to the uniform table headings and classifications as recommended in the United Nations System of National Accounts 1993 (1993 SNA).Different series numbers (dimension “Series”) are used to store different time-series versions of national accounts statistics. Series numbers with two digits (10,20) refer to data compiled following the 1968 SNA national accounts methodology, while series numbers with three digits (100, 200, etc) refer to data compiled using the 1993 SNA national accounts methodology, and series numbers with four digits (1000, 1100, etc) refer to data compiled using the 2008 SNA national accounts methodology. In addition to different methodologies, different series numbers are used when data are reported in different currencies, fiscal years, or by different sources. Furthermore, data are stored under a new series number whenever there are significant changes in compilation practices which make the time series no longer comparable.
    • September 2015
      Source: Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies, Burundi
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 September, 2015
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    • December 2015
      Source: World Health Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 June, 2016
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      National Health Accounts (NHA) provides evidence to monitor trends in health spending for all sectors- public and private, different health care activities, providers, diseases, population groups and regions in a country. It helps in developing nationals
    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 June, 2016
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      National landings in domestic ports
    • March 2015
      Source: National Venture Capital Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 February, 2016
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      The NVCA Yearbook is an annual comprehensive analysis of U.S. venture capital industry statistics. The publication includes metrics regarding commitments made to venture capital funds, venture capital investments into entrepreneurial companies and venture-backed exits (mergers and acquisitions as well as IPOs). It also includes appendices regarding portfolio company valuation guidelines, international accounting convergence and venture capital activity outside the United States.
    • October 2015
      Source: Water FootPrint Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 October, 2015
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    • June 2015
      Source: McAfee
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 September, 2015
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      Cybercrime is a growth industry. The returns are great, and the risks are low. We estimate that the likely annual cost to the global economy from cybercrime is more than $400 billion.1 A conservative estimate would be $375 billion in losses, while the maximum could be as much as $575 billion. Even the smallest of these figures is more than the national income of most countries and governments and companies underestimate how much risk they face from cybercrime and how quickly this risk can grow.
    • September 2006
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 September, 2014
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      New entrants to a level of education are students who are entering any programme leading to a recognised qualification at this level of education for the first time, irrespective of whether the students enter the programme at the beginning or at an advanced stage of the programme. Individuals who are returning to study at a level following a period of absence from studying at that same level are not considered to be new entrants. Foreign students who are enrolling for the first time in the country for which the data are reported are counted as new entrants, regardless of their previous education in other countries.
    • December 2010
      Source: Friedrich Schneider
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 July, 2012
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      Source: Schneider, Friedrich , Buehn, Andreas and Montenegro, Claudio E.(2010) 'New Estimates for the Shadow Economies all over the World', International Economic Journal, 24: 4, 443-461. This dataset presents estimations of the shadow economies for 162 countries, including developing, Eastern European, Central Asian, and high income OECD countries over 1999 to 2006/2007.
    • January 2013
      Source: Maddison Project
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 October, 2015
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      The Maddison Project has launched an updated version of the original Maddison dataset in January 2013. The update incorporates much of the latest research in the field, and presents new estimates of economic growth in the world economic between AD 1 and 2010. The new estimates are presented and discussed in Bolt and Van Zanden (2014). The Maddison Project: collaborative research on historical national accounts. The Economic History Review, 67 (3): 627–651.
    • November 2016
      Source: National Bureau of Statistics, Nigeria
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 December, 2016
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      Nigeria Trade Statistics by Region and Major Trading Partners, 2016
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2016
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      It presents the whole set of non financial accounts, from the production account to the acquisitions of non-financial assets accounts.For general government sector, property income, other current transfers and capital transfers are consolidated..
  • O
    • November 2016
      Source: Ocean Health Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2017
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      Ocean Health Index, 2016
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 December, 2016
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      The OECD's quarterly national accounts (QNA) dataset presents data collected from all the OECD member countries and some other major economies on the basis of a standardised questionnaire as well as countries' own definitions and classifications. It contains a wide selection of generally seasonally adjusted quarterly series most widely used for economic analysis from 1960 or whenever available.   Note: The base year for some indicators, which are associated with reference year, have been kept constant because the base year changes country wise in source.(Base year ranges from 1995-2013) Reference year has changed for OECD from 2005 to 2010
    • March 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 March, 2014
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      In national currency, in current prices and constant prices (national base year, previous year prices and OECD base year i.e. 2005) - and for comparative purposes in US $ current prices and constant prices (using exchange rate and PPPs). Expressed in millions and in indices. For the Euro area countries, the data in national currency for all years are calculated using the fixed conversion rates against the euro.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 April, 2016
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    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 October, 2016
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      These tables are a complement to the report Agricultural Policy Monitoring and Evaluation 2016 monitors agricultural policy developments in OECD member countries, and nine emerging economies: Brazil, China, Colombia, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Russia, South Africa, Ukraine and Viet Nam. The OECD uses a comprehensive system for measuring and classifying support to agriculture - the Producer and Consumer Support Estimates (PSEs and CSEs) and related indicators. They provide insight into the increasingly complex nature of agricultural policy and serve as a basis for OECD’s agricultural policy monitoring and evaluation.
    • February 2012
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      This dataset covers the uses of wildlife resources and related pressures from human activities: fish production; catches of fish and other aquatic animals and products and the management of wildlife resources: biosphere reserves and wetlands of international importance; major protected areas.
    • April 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 May, 2014
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      Foreign direct investment reflects the objective of obtaining a lasting interest by a resident entity in one economy (‘‘direct investor'') in anentity resident in an economy other than that of the investor (‘‘direct investment enterprise''). The lasting interest implies the existence of a long-term relationship between the direct investor and the enterprise and a significant degree of influence on the management of the enterprise. Direct investment involves both the initial transaction between the two entities and all subsequent capital transactions between them and among affiliated enterprises, both incorporated and unincorporated.
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 December, 2016
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       Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is a category of investment that reflects the objective of establishing a lasting interest by a resident enterprise in one economy (direct investor) in an enterprise (direct investment enterprise) that is resident in an economy other than that of the direct investor. The lasting interest implies the existence of a long-term relationship between the direct investor and the direct investment enterprise and a significant degree of influence (not necessarily control) on the management of the enterprise. The direct or indirect ownership of 10% or more of the voting power of an enterprise resident in one economy by an investor resident in another economy is the statistical evidence of such a relationship. FDI statistics are on a directional basis (inward or outward) and relate to FDI flows, FDI positions (stocks) and FDI income. Outward investments are cross-border investments by direct investors resident in the reporting country while inward investments are investments by non-resident investors in the reporting country. FDI flows are cross-border financial transactions within a given period (e.g. year, quarter) between affiliated enterprises that are in a direct investment relationship. FDI positions relate to the stock of investments at a given point in time (e.g. end of year, end of quarter). FDI flows and positions include equity (10% or more voting shares), reinvestment of earnings and inter-company debt. FDI income is the return on direct investment positions of equity (dividends and reinvested earnings) and debt (interest).
    • November 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2015
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      Pension fund assets in OECD countries hit a record USD 20.1 trillion in 2011 but return on investment fell below zero, with an average negative return of -1.7%, according to the OECD’s latest Pension Markets in Focus. The report says that weak equity markets and low interest rates drove the poor performance.
    • May 2013
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 September, 2014
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      In this version, seven GVCs indicators are presented for 59 economies (34 OECD and 23 non-OECD economies, plus the "rest of the world" and the European Union) for 18 industries in the years 1995, 2000, 2005, 2008 and 2009. The indicators are calculated based on the five global input-output matrices of the TiVA database. More details on the aggregation and specific country notes can be downloaded at http://www.oecd.org/sti/ind/input-outputtables.htm and http://oe.cd/gvc/.
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 December, 2016
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      OECD Health Data 2015 offers the most comprehensive source of comparable statistics on health and health systems across OECD countries. It is an essential tool for health researchers and policy advisors in governments, the private sector and the academic community, to carry out comparative analyses and draw lessons from international comparisons of diverse health care systems.
    • July 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 July, 2016
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      Most of the data published in this database are taken from the individual contributions of national correspondents appointed by the OECD Secretariat with the approval of the authorities of Member countries. Consequently, these data have not necessarily been harmonised at international level. This network of correspondents, constituting the Continuous Reporting System on Migration (SOPEMI), covers most OECD Member countries as well as the Baltic States, Bulgaria and Romania. SOPEMI has no authority to impose changes in data collection procedures. It is an observatory which, by its very nature, has to use existing statistics. However, it does play an active role in suggesting what it considers to be essential improvements in data collection and makes every effort to present consistent and well-documented statistics.
    • October 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 November, 2016
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      The Key Economic Indicators (KEI) database contains monthly and quarterly statistics (and associated statistical methodological information) for all OECD member countries and for a selection of non-member countries on a wide variety of economic indicators, namely: quarterly national accounts, industrial production, composite leading indicators, business tendency and consumer opinion surveys, retail trade, consumer and producer prices, hourly earnings, employment/unemployment, interest rates, monetary aggregates, exchange rates, international trade and balance of payments.
    • January 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 March, 2016
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      This database, published twice a year, provides a set of indicators that reflect the level and structure of the efforts undertaken by OECD Member countries and selected non-member economies in the field of Science and Technology as available from 1981 onwards. It includes final or provisional results as well as forecasts established by government authorities. Indicators cover resources devoted to research and development, patent families, technology balance of payments and international trade in highly R&D-intensive industries. Also presented are the underlying economic series used to calculate these indicators. Indicators on R&D expenditures, budgets and personnel are derived from the OECD's Research and Development Statistics (RDS) database, which is based on the data reported to OECD and Eurostat in the framework of the joint OECD/Eurostat international data collection on resources devoted to R&D. The sources for the other indicators include the OECD databases on Activities of Foreign Affiliates (AFA), on Bilateral Trade in Goods by Industry and End-use Category database (BTDIxE), on Patents and on Technological Balance of Payments (TBP). YEARS COVERED: 1981 onward. COUNTRIES COVERED: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Korea, Luxembourg, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, and United States. NON-MEMBER ECONOMIES: Argentina, China, Romania, Russian Federation, Singapore, South Africa and Chinese Taipei.
    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      The [Monthly Monetary and Financial Statistics (MEI)] dataset is a subset of the [Main Economic Indicators] (MEI) database which contains predominantly monthly statistics, and associated statistical methodological information, for the 34 OECD member countries and the non-member countries: Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russian Federation, and South Africa. The MEI database contains a wide variety statistics that can be classified as Short-Term Economic Statistics. The [Financial Indicators (MEI)] dataset itself contains financial statistics on five separate subjects: Monetary Aggregates, Interest Rates, Exchange Rates, Reserve Assets, and Share Prices. The data series presented within these subjects have been chosen as the most relevant financial statistics in the MEI database for which comparable data across countries is available. In all cases a lot of effort has been made to ensure that the data are internationally comparable across all countries presented and that all the subjects have good historical time-series’ data to aid with analysis. All data are available monthly, and are presented as either an index (where the year 2010 is the base year) or as a level depending on which measure is seen as the most appropriate and/or useful in the economic analysis context.
    • May 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 July, 2016
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      This Dataset contains information using an "indicator" approach, focusing on cross-country comparisons; the aim being to make the accounts more accessible and informative, whilst, at the same time, taking the opportunity to present the conceptual underpinning of, and comparability issues inherent in, each of the indicators presented.
    • June 2012
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2014
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      The OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2012 presents, in a series of country profiles, the main features, strengths and weaknesses of national STI systems and major recent changes in national STI policy. The statistical dimension of the country profiles has drawn on the work and empirical research conducted by the OECD on the measurement of innovation and the development of internationally comparable STI indicators for policy analysis.
    • June 2012
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2014
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      The OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2012 presents, in a series of country profiles, the main features, strengths and weaknesses of national STI systems and major recent changes in national STI policy. The statistical dimension of the country profiles has drawn on the work and empirical research conducted by the OECD on the measurement of innovation and the development of internationally comparable STI indicators for policy analysis.
    • June 2012
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 August, 2014
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      The OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2012 presents, in a series of country profiles, the main features, strengths and weaknesses of national STI systems and major recent changes in national STI policy. The statistical dimension of the country profiles has drawn on the work and empirical research conducted by the OECD on the measurement of innovation and the development of internationally comparable STI indicators for policy analysis.
    • June 2012
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 September, 2014
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      The OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook 2012 presents, in a series of country profiles, the main features, strengths and weaknesses of national STI systems and major recent changes in national STI policy. The statistical dimension of the country profiles has drawn on the work and empirical research conducted by the OECD on the measurement of innovation and the development of internationally comparable STI indicators for policy analysis.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2016
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      The OECD Science, Technology and Industry Outlook reviews key trends in STI policies and performance in OECD countries and major emerging economies. It is published every two years and draws on a unique international policy survey conducted by the OECD - with more than 45 countries involved in 2014 - and the latest OECD work on STI policy analysis and measurement. Following an overview of the recent STI global landscape, key current policy issues are discussed across a series of thematic policy profiles. Country profiles report the STI performance of individual countries and the most recent national policy developments.
    • October 2013
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 October, 2013
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      This table gives information on official financial flows by type and sources. It is further broken down by individual country, geographical region and economic grouping (as recipients); and expressed in millions of dollars, as percentage of total flows and as percentage of region.
    • June 2016
      Source: Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 July, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 January, 2017
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      1. Global oil demand, supply, oil market balance and required amounts of OPEC crude. 2. World oil DemandWorld oil demand growth in 2016 is expected to average 1.22 mb/d. For 2017, world oil demand is forecast to grow by 1.15 mb/d. While the OECD will contribute positively to oil demand growth adding some 0.10 mb/d, the bulk of the growth in 2017 will originate from the non-OECD with 1.05 mb/d.World Oil SupplyWorld Oil Supply Non-OPEC oil supply is expected to contract by 0.79 mb/d in 2016 driven by higher-than-expected output in 2Q16 in the US and UK. In 2017, non-OPEC supply is expected to decline by 0.15 mb/d, following a downward revision of 40 tb/d. OPEC NGL production is forecast to grow by 0.16 mb/d and 0.15 mb/d in 2016 and 2017, respectively. In July, OPEC production increased by 46 tb/d to average 33.11 mb/d, according to secondary sources.
    • August 2016
      Source: Wikipedia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 September, 2016
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    • November 2016
      Source: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 December, 2016
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      The OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin (ASB) provides detailed and comprehensive time-series data on many different aspects of the global petroleum industry, including production, demand, imports and exports, as well as exploration, production and transportation activities. The publication contains, in particular, key statistical data on oil and natural gas activities in each of OPEC’s 12 Member Countries: Algeria, Angola, Ecuador, Islamic Republic of Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Venezuela. Additionally, it provides valuable industry data for various countries with detailed classifications mainly by geographical region, and covers the major economic areas around the world. This year’s 2015 ASB, which comprises data up to the end of 2015, includes the following important highlights:In 2015, world crude oil production increased by 1.75 million barrels/day (b/d), or 2.4 per cent, as compared to 2014, marking the second highest increase within the last ten years. Among non-OPEC Countries, the biggest yearly increase was for the United States, which grew by 0.72m b/d, or 8.3 per cent, leading to the highest production level since the early 1970s. Crude production during 2015 also increased in the United Kingdom, which saw growth of 0.10m b/d, or 13.4 per cent, for the first time since 1999. Similarly, Norway, which had already reversed its downward trend in 2014, continued to increase in 2015 by 0.06m b/d, or 3.7 per cent. OPEC crude oil production averaged 32.32m b/d during 2015, increasing by 0.93m b/d, or 3.0 per cent, over 2014, the first surge in production after two years of decline. In 2015, the top three crude oil producing countries were Saudi Arabia (10.19m b/d), Russia (10.11m b/d) and the United States (9.43m b/d). Saudi Arabia displaced Russia from first place for the first time since 2005.In 2015, OPEC petroleum export revenues fell by 45.8 per cent from 2014 to $518.2 billion, marking the lowest level seen since 2005. Total OPEC posted a current account deficit of $99.6bn in 2015 compared with a surplus of $238.1bn in 2014. Notably, the last time OPEC recorded a current account deficit was in 1998. In value, total OPEC exports declined by 29.1 per cent year-on-year (y-o-y) while total imports fell 8.7 per cent y-o-y.World oil demand averaged 93.0m b/d in 2015, up by 1.7 per cent y-o-y, with the largest increases taking place in Asia Pacific, particularly India and China, North America, Western Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Total OECD oil demand grew soundly during 2015, while it declined in Latin America for the first time since 2003. OPEC oil demand remained robust during 2015 in the Middle East, Africa and Asia Pacific, while it declined in Latin America — gasoline, kerosene and distillates accounted for the bulk of growth. Distillates and gasoline account for around 56 per cent of total world oil demand and were on increasing trends, while residual fuel oil requirements declined for another year. Gasoline dominated 2015 oil demand growth in Asia Pacific and North America, while distillates appeared robust in Western and Eastern Europe.Total OPEC crude oil exports stood at 23.6m b/d in 2015, up slightly from 23.2m b/d in 2014. This increase represents 1.7 per cent growth y-o-y. The bulk of OPEC crude oil was exported to the Asia Pacific region at a volume of 14.5m b/d or 61.5 per cent. Significant volumes were also exported to Europe, which increased its imports from OPEC MCs to 4.2m b/d in 2015, from 4.0m b/d in 2014. North America imported 2.8m b/d of crude oil from OPEC MCs, 10.6 per cent less than during 2014.Total world proven crude oil reserves stood at 1,493 billion barrels in 2015, increasing slightly by 0.1 per cent from the previous year’s level of 1,490bn b. The largest additions came from Angola, Venezuela and IR Iran, while declines were seen in Norway, the UK and Colombia. OPEC increased its proven crude oil reserves by 0.1 per cent to 1,211bn b in 2015, maintaining their share of 81.2 per cent of total world crude oil reserves.In 2015, proven natural gas reserves declined by 0.3 per cent to approximately 202.0 trillion standard cu m. This decrease came on the back of high natural gas production and lower expenditures on exploration and development, mainly as a result of lower gas prices. Total world natural gas marketed production increased by 1.9 per cent in 2015 to reach 3.6 trillion standard cu m; increases occurred mainly in North America and the Middle East.World refinery capacity expanded by 0.8m b/cd to stand at 96.6m b/cd during 2015, mainly supported by additions in the Middle East and Asia Pacific regions. In the Middle East, expansions came largely from OPEC MCs, while in the Asia Pacific region growth came predominantly from India and China. Refinery capacity in the OECD region continued to decline despite small gains seen in the United States. Global refinery throughput ramped up by 2.4 per cent to reach 80.5m b/d in 2015, with the largest gains seen in the Middle East and Asia Pacific regions. In the Middle East, gains in refinery throughput originated in OPEC MCs, while India and China dominated the increases seen in the Asia and Pacific region.The OPEC Reference Basket averaged $49.49/b in 2015, down from $96.29/b in 2014 and dropping to the lowest yearly average observed since 2004. The yearly decline was valued at $46.80/b, or 48.6 per cent, as compared to 2014. Volatility in 2015 stood at $8.50/b, or 17.2 per cent, relative to the yearly average. The oil market has remained in contango since 2H14 and throughout 2015.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 April, 2016
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      Notes: 1. Stock change assumptions reflect the development of Strategic Petroleum Reserves (SPR) in some non-OECD countries, and the rising need for stocks as refinery capacity expands. These rates of rise in stocks will eventually slow, as growth in SPR slows as does refinery expansion. The medium-term pattern eventually reverts, in the long-term, to historical average behavior. 2. For Indicators, like Long term real GP growth rates  the date has been considered the highest number although it has a range which are as. 2014- 2020 for 2020, 2020-2030 for 2030, 2030-2040 for 2040
    • January 2015
      Source: Open Data Research Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
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      This dataset shows the sub-index and overall rankings given to countries in the Open Data Barometer Study, a multi-dimensional measure of open data context, implementation and impacts across 77 countries. More information on the study methodology and variable definitions can be found in the Open Data Barometer 2013 Global Report
    • July 2014
      Source: Open Data Research Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 November, 2014
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      Peer-reviewed numerical scores assigned to each primary data variable collected for the Open Data Barometer.
    • October 2016
      Source: Open Data Watch
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2016
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      Score Type Options: Three sets of scores are available: raw, weighted, or standardized. Raw scores have values between 0 and 1 as recorded in the original assessment; subscores are simple totals. Weighted scores use a predefined weighting matrix; subscores are simple totals. Standardized scores are scaled from 0 to 100; subscores are weighted averages.
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 April, 2016
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      This table contains statistics on research and development ( R&D) expenditure performed in the higher education and private non-profit sectors by field of science (natural sciences, engineering, medical sciences, agricultural sciences, social sciences, and humanities) and source of funds (direct government, public general university funds, higher education, private non-profit, business enterprise, and funds from abroad). Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs).
    • January 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 October, 2016
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    • January 2015
      Source: Ministry of Tourism, Government of India
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 May, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: ExxonMobil
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 December, 2016
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      The Outlook for Energy is ExxonMobil’s long-term global view of energy demand and supply. Its findings help to guide ExxonMobil's long-term investments, Outlook help to promote better understanding of the issues shaping the world’s energy future. Updated each year, this dataset covers the period to 2040.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2016
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      This table contains figures on the activity of affiliates located abroad by host country in the total manufacturing, total services and total business enterprise sectors. The units used to present data in AMNE are millions of national currency for monetary variables and units for the other variables. Monetary variables are in current prices. Euro-area countries: national currency data is expressed in euro beginning with the year of entry into the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). For years prior to the year of entry into EMU, data have been converted from the former national currency using the appropriate irrevocable conversion rate. This presentation facilitates comparisons within a country over time and ensures that the historical evolution is preserved. Please note, however, that pre-EMU euro are a notional unit and should not be used to form area aggregates or to carry out cross-country comparisons.
    • June 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 December, 2016
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      This table contains figures on the activity of affiliates located abroad by host country in the total manufacturing sector or in the total business sector.The units used to present data in AFA are millions of national currency for monetary variables and units for the other variables. Monetary variables are in current prices. Euro-area countries: national currency data is expressed in euro beginning with the year of entry into the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). For years prior to the year of entry into EMU, data have been converted from the former national currency using the appropriate irrevocable conversion rate. This presentation facilitates comparisons within a country over time and ensures that the historical evolution is preserved. Please note, however, that pre-EMU euro are a notional unit and should not be used to form area aggregates or to carry out cross-country comparisons.
    • January 2014
      Source: Oxfam
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 May, 2014
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      Around the world, one in eight people go to bed hungry every night, even though there is enough food for everyone. Our graph illustrates how overconsumption, misuse of resources and waste are common elements of a system that leaves hundreds of millions without enough to eat.
  • P
    • December 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 October, 2016
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      Although there are clear definitions for all the terms used in this survey, countries might have different methodologies to calculate tonne-kilometer and passenger-kilometers. Methods could be based on traffic or mobility surveys, use very different sampling methods and estimating techniques which could affect the comparability of their statistics. Also, if the definition on road fatalities is very clear and well applied by most coutries, this is not the case for road injuies. Indeed, not only countries might have different definitions but the important underreporting of road injuries in most countries can distort analysis based on these data. OECD: Excludes non-ITF states Israel and Chile. Western European Countries (WECs): Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs): Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, FYROM, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia and Slovenia. North America: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Australasia: Australia and New Zealand. In case of missing data for a country, ITF can calculate estimates based generally on the growth rates of the relevant region. These estimates are used solely to calculate aggregated trends in graphic representations and are not shown at the individual country level.
    • February 2016
      Source: Passport Index
      Uploaded by: Alina Buzanakova
      Accessed On: 12 February, 2016
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      Passport Index is an interactive tool, which collects, displays and ranks the passports of the world.You can discover the world’s passports on a map, by country name, by Passport Power Rank and even by the color of their cover.Visa Free ScorePassports accumulate points for each visa free country that their holders can visit without a visa, or they can obtain a visa on arrival.Passport Power RankPassports are ranked based on their Visa Free Score. The higher the Visa Free Score, the better the Passport Power Rank.MethodologyThe country list is based on the 193 UN member countries and 6 territories (Macao, Kosovo, etc.) for a total of 199. Territories annexed to other countries such as Norfolk Island, French Polynesia, etc. are excluded. Data is based on research from publicly available sources, as well as information shared by government agencies.
    • September 2016
      Source: Willis Towers Watson
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 November, 2016
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    • October 2016
      Source: United Nations Conference on Trade and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 December, 2016
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      The data presents time series on receipts and payments of personal remittances in millions of dollars. The data is also shown as percentage of exports (receipts) and imports (payments) of goods and services, and as percentage of GDP.Personal remittances is defined as the sum of two items: (1) compensation of employees, defined as the income of non-resident workers employed in an economy and of residents employed by nonresident employers; (2) personal (current) transfers, defined as current transfers in kind or in cash, between resident and nonresident households. These are the two items in the balance of payments framework that substantially relate to remittances. Both are standard components in the current account. A broader definition of personal remittances would also include capital transfers between resident and nonresident households. However, capital transfers is a supplementary component in the capital account. As a result data coverage on capital transfers is much sparse than the other two items.The data on compensation of employees, personal transfers and capital transfers between households have been collected by the IMF from national agencies or, in cases of non-availability, estimated by the IMF.
    • September 2016
      Source: Political Terror Scale
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      Political Terror Scale Levels 1 - Coun­tries un­der a se­cure rule of law, people are not im­prisoned for their views, and tor­ture is rare or ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murders are ex­tremely rare.2 - There is a lim­ited amount of im­pris­on­ment for non­vi­ol­ent polit­ic­al activ­ity. However, few per­sons are af­fected, tor­ture and beat­ings are ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murder is rare.3 - There is ex­tens­ive polit­ic­al im­pris­on­ment, or a re­cent his­tory of such im­pris­on­ment. Ex­e­cu­tion or oth­er polit­ic­al murders and bru­tal­ity may be com­mon. Un­lim­ited de­ten­tion, with or without a tri­al, for polit­ic­al views is ac­cep­ted.4 - Civil and polit­ic­al rights vi­ol­a­tions have ex­pan­ded to large num­bers of the pop­u­la­tion. Murders, dis­ap­pear­ances, and tor­ture are a com­mon part of life. In spite of its gen­er­al­ity, on this level ter­ror af­fects those who in­terest them­selves in polit­ics or ideas.5 - Ter­ror has ex­pan­ded to the whole pop­u­la­tion. The lead­ers of these so­ci­et­ies place no lim­its on the means or thor­ough­ness with which they pur­sue per­son­al or ideo­lo­gic­al goals.
    • December 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2016
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      It presents population data and employment by main activity. It includes national concept data for economically active population, unemployed persons, total employment, employees and self-employed, as well as domestic concept data for total employment, employees and self-employed. The domestic concept data are available broken down by main activity.It has been prepared from statistics reported to the OECD by Member countries in their answers to annual national accounts questionnaire.
    • April 2016
      Source: United Nations Resettlement Programme
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 June, 2016
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      This dataset covers the topics of Urban population and proportion of urban population living in slum area across countries & regions for the year of 1990-2012
    • March 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 March, 2016
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      The FAOSTAT PopSTAT module contains timeseries on population and economically active population. The series consist of both estimates and projections for different periods as available from the original sources, namely: Population data from the UN Population Division and the data refers to the UN Revision 2012. Long term series estimates and projects from 1961 to 2050. Economically active population from the ILO and the data refers to the 5th edition, revision 2009. Long term series estimates and projects from 1980 to 2020.
    • May 2015
      Source: Earth Policy Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 June, 2015
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      This is part of a supporting dataset for Lester R. Brown, Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2012).
    • October 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 December, 2016
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      The World Bank periodically prepares poverty assessments of countries in which it has an active program, in close collaboration with national institutions, other development agencies, and civil society, including poor people's organizations. Assessments report the extent and causes of poverty and propose strategies to reduce it. Countries have varying definitions of poverty, and comparisons can be difficult. National poverty lines tend to have higher purchasing power in rich countries, where standards used are more generous than in poor countries. Poverty measures based on an international poverty line attempt to hold the real value of the poverty line constant across countries, including when making comparisons over time. Data here includes measures of population living below the national poverty line as well as the international poverty line. Also included are income distributions and urban and rural poverty
    • June 2016
      Source: International Atomic Energy Agency
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 June, 2016
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      PRIS covers two kinds of data: general and design information on power reactors, and information about operating experience with nuclear power plants. General and design information covers all reactors that are in operation, under construction, or shut-down in IAEA Member States, and in Taiwan, China. Data on operating experience cover operational reactors, and historical data cover shutdown reactors, in IAEA Member States and in Taiwan, China. In these areas PRIS is considered the most complete and authoritative source of statistical data
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 April, 2016
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    • December 2015
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2016
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    • October 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 November, 2016
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      This dataset covers only Cross-Country-Concepts - Portfolio Investment related indicators. Please visit Principal Global Indicators - Data by Indicator for other set of Principal Global Indicators. 
    • December 2016
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 December, 2016
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      The Principal Global Indicators (PGI) dataset provides internationally comparable data for the Group of 20 economies (G-20) and economies with systemically important financial sectors that are not members of the G-20. The PGI facilitates the monitoring of economic and financial developments for these jurisdictions. Launched in 2009, the PGI website is hosted by the IMF and is a joint undertaking of the Inter-Agency Group of Economic and Financial Statistics (IAG).
    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 January, 2017
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      Private transactions are those undertaken by firms and individuals resident in the reporting country.
    • April 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 August, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Private fixed investment in advanced economies contracted sharply during the global financial crisis, and there has been little recovery since. Investment has generally slowed more gradually in the rest of the world. Although housing investment fell especially sharply during the crisis, business investment accounts for the bulk of the slump, and the overriding factor holding it back has been the overall weakness of economic activity. In some countries, other contributing factors include financial constraints and policy uncertainty. These findings suggest that addressing the general weakness in economic activity is crucial for restoring growth in private investment.
    • July 2013
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 November, 2014
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      Privatization Database provides information on privatization transactions of at least US$1 million in developing countries from 2000 to 2008.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 April, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The 'Producer Prices (MEI)' dataset predominantly monthly statistics, and associated statistical methodological information, for the 34 OECD member countries and for some six non-member countries: Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russian Federation and South Africa. The ‘Producer Prices (MEI)’ dataset itself contains statistics on Producer Price Indices. The data series presented have been chosen as the most relevant prices statistics for which comparable data across countries is available. In all cases a lot of effort has been made to ensure that the data are internationally comparable across all countries presented and that all the subjects have good historical time-series’ data to aid with analysis. Data are available monthly for all the countries except for Australia and New Zealand (quarterly data), and are presented as an index where the year 2010 is the base year.
    • December 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2016
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    • December 2015
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 March, 2016
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      The Agricultural Production domain covers: Quantity produced, Producer price, Value at farmgate, Area harvested, Yield per hectare.
    • December 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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      The agricultural production domain covers: Quantity produced Producer price Value at farmgate (forthcoming) Area harvested Yield per hectare   Data Files: http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data/QAhttp://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data/QLhttp://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data/QP
    • January 2017
      Source: Bank for International Settlements
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The property price statistics currently include data from 41 countries, and are available at different frequencies. The data differ significantly from country to country, for instance in terms of sources of information on prices, type of property, area covered, property vintage, priced unit, detailed compilation methods and seasonal adjustment. This reflects two facts. Firstly, that the processes associated with buying and selling a property and hence data available, vary between countries and secondly, that there are currently no specific international standards for property price statistics.
    • April 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 August, 2015
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      This chapter finds that potential output growth across advanced and emerging market economies has declined in recent years. In advanced economies, this decline started as far back as the early 2000s and worsened with the global financial crisis. In emerging market economies, in contrast, it began only after the crisis. The chapter’s analysis suggests that potential output growth in advanced economies is likely to increase slightly from current rates as some crisis-related effects wear off, but to remain below precrisis rates in the medium term. The main reasons are aging populations and the gradual increase in capital growth from current rates as output and investment recover from the crisis. In contrast, in emerging market economies, potential output growth is expected to decline further, owing to aging populations, weaker investment, and lower total factor productivity growth as these economies catch up to the technological frontier.
    • September 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 September, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat's database covers 1) Production and trade in roundwood and wood products, including primary and secondary products 2) Economic data on forestry and logging, including employment data 3) Sustainable forest management, comprising forest resources (assets) and environmental data. The main types of primary forest products included in (1) are: roundwood, sawnwood, wood-based panels, pulp, and paper and paperboard. Secondary products include further processed wood and paper products. These products are presented in greater detail; definitions are available. All of the data are compiled from the Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire (JFSQ), except for table (e), which is directly extracted from Eurostat's international trade database COMEXT (HS/CN Chapter 44). The tables in (1) cover details of the following topics: - Roundwood removals and production by type of wood and assortment (a) - Roundwood production by type of ownership (b) - Production and trade in roundwood, fuelwood and other basic products (c) - Trade in industrial roundwood by assortment and species (d) - Tropical wood imports to the EU from Chapter 44 of the Harmonised System (e) - Production and trade in sawnwood, panels and other primary products (f) - Sawnwood trade by species (g) - Production and trade in pulp and paper & paperboard (h) - Trade in secondary wood and paper products (i) Data in (2) include the output, intermediate consumption, gross value added, fixed capital consumption, gross fixed capital formation and different measures of income of forestry and logging.  The data are in current basic prices and are compatible with National Accounts. They are collected as part of Intergrated environmental and economic accounting for forests (IEEAF), which also covers labour input in annual work units (AWU).  Under (2), two separate tables cover the number of employees of forestry and logging, the manufacture of wood and products of wood and cork, and the manufacture of paper and paper products, as estimated from the Labour Force Survey results. There are two separate tables because of the change in the EU's classification of economic activities from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 in 2008. More detailed information on wood products and accounting, including definitions and questionnaires, can be found on our open-access communication platform under the interest group 'Forestry statistics and accounts'.  Data in (3) are not collected by Eurostat, but by the FAO, UNECE, Forest Euope, the European Commission's departments for Environment and the Joint Research Centre. They include forest area, wood volume, defoliation on sample plots, fires and areas with protective functions.
    • November 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 November, 2016
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      PPPs are the rates of currency conversion that eliminate the differences in price levels between countries. Per capita volume indices based on PPP converted data reflect only differences in the volume of goods and services produced. Comparative price levels are defined as the ratios of PPPs to exchange rates. They provide measures of the differences in price levels between countries. The PPPs are given in national currency units per US dollar. The price levels and volume indices derived using these PPPs have been rebased on the OECD average.
  • Q
    • January 2016
      Source: University of Gothenburg
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 February, 2016
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      It has been one year since we last launched an updated version of the QoG Standard dataset. We have made some changes to the datasets, the method used for updating it, and to the actual codebook, but if you have used the datasets before they will probably feel familiar. The codebook is now created automatically on the basis of meta-data that we extract from the QoG-Datasets. On this basis, we run mata-code in Stata and create the Latex-code, which we compile to the PDF that you can download. Most importantly though is the fact that we in the current version not only have updated old data sources but we have also include many new ones as well. This means that the new QoG Standard approximately includes over 2000 variables, which is a lot more compared to older versions. For this reason, we have also abandoned the old heuristic in dividing the variables into the three categories of “what it is”, “how to get it”, and “what you get”. Instead the variables in the current version are divided into sixteen thematic categories such as Quality of Government, Economy, Media, Environment, and Political System etc. You will find more information about this under the section of Variable Categories in the Codebook. We hope that this new division will facilitate your search for variables. Since the launch of the QoG Standard Dataset it has received the Lijphart, Przeworski, Verba Award for Best Dataset by the APSA Comparative Politics Section in 2009. In 2013, the QoG Standard Dataset had 18,000 page views.
    • October 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2016
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      The World Bank launched the new Quarterly External Debt Statistics (QEDS) GDDS database. This database is consistent with the classifications and definitions of the 2013 External Debt Statistics: Guide for Compilers and Users (2013 EDS Guide) and Sixth Edition of Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual (BPM6). The QEDS GDDS database provides external debt data, starting from 2002Q4, for an extension of countries that participate in the IMF's General Data Dissemination System (GDDS).
    • October 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2016
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      The World Bank launched the new Quarterly External Debt Statistics (QEDS) SDDS database. This database is consistent with the classifications and definitions of the 2013 External Debt Statistics: Guide for Compilers and Users (2013 EDS Guide) and Sixth Edition of Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual (BPM6). The QEDS SDDS database provides detailed external debt data starting from 1998Q1. Data are published individually by countries that subscribe to the IMF’s Special Data Dissemination Standard (SDDS), as well as, GDDS participating countries that are in a position to produce the external debt data prescribed by the SDDS.
    • September 2016
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 September, 2016
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      Public Sector Debt Statistics (QPSD) database, jointly developed by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, brings together detailed public sector debt data of selected developing /emerging market countries (Czech Republic is an advanced economy; the rest of the advanced economies will be invited to participate in this initiative in 2012)The QPSD database includes country and cross-country tables, and enables users to query and extract data, by country, group of countries, and specific public debt components. The data represent the following sectors on an as-available basis: General government; o/w Central government; o/w Budgetary central government; Non financial public corporations and Financial public corporations and a table presenting the total public sector debt.
  • R
    • January 2016
      Source: National Science Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 April, 2016
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      Data collected from table 4-16,4-18
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 April, 2016
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      This table contains research and development (R&D) expenditure statistics on current domestic R&D and gross domestic R&D expenditures by sector of performance (business enterprise, government, higher education, private non-profit, and total intramural) and by type of R&D within each sector (basic research, applied research, experimental development, non-specified, and total activity).Unit of measure used - Data are provided in million national currency (for the euro zone, pre-EMU euro or EUR), million current PPP USD and million constant USD (2005 prices and PPPs).
    • April 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 April, 2016
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      This table presents research and development (R&D) personnel statistics. Number of R&D personnel is provided in headcounts and/or full-time equivalent on R&D by sex, sector of employment (business enterprise, government, higher education, and private non-profit) and by formal qualification (university and other diplomas by ISCED classification). Unit of measure used - Headcounts and/or Full-time equivalent on R&D (FTE)
    • October 2015
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 October, 2015
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      Global growth declined in the first half of 2015, reflecting a further slowdown in emerging markets and a weaker recovery in advanced economies. It is now projected at 3.1 percent for 2015 as a whole, slightly lower than in 2014, and 0.2 percentage point below the forecasts in the July 2015 World Economic Outlook (WEO) Update. Prospects across the main countries and regions remain uneven. Relative to last year, growth in advanced economies is expected to pick up slightly, while it is projected to decline in emerging market and developing economies. With declining commodity prices, depreciating emerging market currencies, and increasing financial market volatility, downside risks to the outlook have risen, particularly for emerging market and developing economies. Global activity is projected to gather some pace in 2016. In advanced economies, the modest recovery that started in 2014 is projected to strengthen further. In emerging market and developing economies, the outlook is projected to improve: in particular, growth in countries in economic distress in 2015 (including Brazil, Russia, and some countries in Latin America and in the Middle East), while remaining weak or negative, is projected to be higher next year, more than offsetting the expected gradual slowdown in China.
    • March 2010
      Source: International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 October, 2013
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      Using demographic multi-state, cohort-component methods, projections for 120 countries (covering 93% of the world population in 2005) by five-year age groups, sex, and four levels of educational attainment for the years 2005-2050 are produced. Taking into account differentials in fertility and mortality by education level, the first systematic global educational attainment projections according to four widely differing education scenarios are presented. The results show the possible range of future educational attainment trends around the world, thereby contributing to long-term economic and social planning at the national and international levels, and to the assessment of the feasibility of international education goals. Samir KC et al., Projection of populations by level of educational attainment, age, and sex for 120 countries for 2005-2050, Demographic Research, 22(15), P. 383-472, 16 March 2010: http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol22/15/.
    • June 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 August, 2014
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      The Regional Database contains annual data from 1990 to the most recent available year (generally 2013 for demographic and labour market data, 2011 for regional accounts, innovation and social statistics).
    • July 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 June, 2016
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      The Regional Database contains annual data from 1995 to the most recent available year. The data collection is undertaken by the Directorate of Public Governance and Territorial Development, within the Regional Development Policy division (GOV/RDP). Statistics are collected through an annual questionnaire sent to the delegates of the Working Party on Territorial Indicators (WPTI), and through access to the web-sites of National Statistical Offices and Eurostat.The WPTI is responsible for developing regional (subnational) and urban statistics and providing analysis to support policy evaluations. The Regional Database includes statistics on the regional distribution of resources, regional disparities, and how regions contribute to national growth and the well-being of society.Under this framework, the Regional Database is one of the pillars for providing indicators to the publication OECD Regions at a Glance (link).
    • July 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 June, 2016
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    • July 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 June, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2017
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      The Registered Unemployment and Job Vacancies dataset is a subset of the Short-Term Labour Situation database, which contains predominantly monthly statistics, and associated statistical methodological information, for the 34 OECD member countries and for selected other economies. There are basically two sources for unemployment statistics: labour force surveys and administrative data. Surveys are based on standard methodology and procedures used all over the world while administrative data are subject to national legislations which evolve through time. Consequently registered unemployment data are not comparable across countries. The relationship between survey and registered unemployment is not the same for all countries. Number of registered unemployed persons and registered unemployment rates are presented here because they are monthly and quickly available after their reference period. The job vacancies data provides estimates of the number of unfilled job vacancies across national economies. Series give an indication of the labour demand while the unemployment is linked with the labour supply.
    • August 2012
      Source: Multiple Sources
      Uploaded by: Carpe Facto
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      Spread of religions across the World, by country
    • April 2016
      Source: UNESCO Institute for Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 April, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: Reserve Bank of Australia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 December, 2016
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      Reserve Bank of Australia Assets and Liabilities, 2016 October
    • December 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 December, 2016
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      Data on agricultural land-use are valuable for conducting studies on a various perspectives concerning agricultural production, food security and for deriving cropping intensity among others uses. Indicators derived from the land-use categories can also elucidate the environmental sustainability of countries’ agricultural practices. FAOSTAT Land-use statistics contain a wide range of information on variables that are significant for: understanding the structure of a country’s agricultural sector; making economic plans and policies for food security; deriving environmental indicators, including those related to investment in agriculture and data on gross crop area and net crop area which are useful for policy formulation and monitoring. Land-use resources sub-domain covers: Country area (including area under inland water bodies), Land area (excluding area under inland water bodies), Agricultural area, Arable land and Permanent crops, Arable land, Permanent crops, Permanent meadows and pastures, Forest area, Other land and Area equipped for irrigation. Detailed information on sub-categories: Temporary crops, Temporary meadows and pastures, Fallow land (temporary: less than 5 years), Permanent meadows and pastures cultivated and naturally grown and Organic land. Data are available from 1961 to 2009 for more than 200 countries and areas. Forest area: Global Forest Resource Assessment 2010 (FRA 2010) is the main source of forest area data in FAOSTAT. Data were provided by countries for years 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2010. Data for intermediate years were estimated for FAO using linear interpolation and tabulation. Some of the most interesting data for economists is found in this domain. The national distribution of land, among arable land, pastures and other lands, as well as the importance of irrigation are just some of the interesting data sets.
    • October 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 November, 2016
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      UN FAO Resource Statistics - Machinery. The Agricultural Resources domain covers: Investment, Land and irrigation, Labour, Machinery, Fertilizers, Pesticides, Population. The Resources domain considers factors of production for the agricultural sector. Broadly speaking, this section details how countries differ in endowments of the three classic inputs: labour, land and capital. Qualitative differences are important for each but are particularly difficult to summarise in a single indicator for land, the productivity of which depends heavily on water and soil conditions.
    • December 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 December, 2016
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      UN FAO Resource Statistics - Pesticides Consumption The Pesticides (use) database includes data on the use of major pesticide groups (Insecticides, Herbicides, Fungicides, Plant growth regulators and Rodenticides) and of relevant chemical families. Data report the quantities (in tonnes of active ingredients) of pesticides used in or sold to the agricultural sector for crops and seeds. Information on quantities applied to single crops is not available
    • July 2016
      Source: Food and Agriculture Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 December, 2016
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    • September 2016
      Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 November, 2016
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      Rice Area, Yield, and Production, 2013-2015 Marketing Years
    • December 2014
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 September, 2016
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      Although there are clear definitions for all the terms used in this survey, countries might have different methodologies to calculate tonne-kilometer and passenger-kilometers. Methods could be based on traffic or mobility surveys, use very different sampling methods and estimating techniques which could affect the comparability of their statistics. Also, if the definition on road fatalities is very clear and well applied by most coutries, this is not the case for road injuies. Indeed, not only countries might have different definitions but the important underreporting of road injuries in most countries can distort analysis based on these data. Aggregation and consolidationOECD: Excludes non-ITF states Israel and Chile. Western European Countries (WECs): Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Central and Eastern European Countries (CEECs): Albania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, FYROM, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia and Slovenia. North America: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Australasia: Australia and New Zealand. TransformationsIn case of missing data for a country, ITF can calculate estimates based generaly on the growth rates of the relevant region. These estimates are used solely to calculate aggregated trends in graphic representations and are not shown at the individual country level. 
    • January 2017
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 January, 2017
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      Roundwood production (the term is used as a synonymous term for "removals") comprise all quantities of wood removed from the forest and other wooded land or other felling site during a certain period of time. It is reported in cubic metres underbark (i.e excluding bark).
    • September 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat's database covers 1) Production and trade in roundwood and wood products, including primary and secondary products 2) Economic data on forestry and logging, including employment data 3) Sustainable forest management, comprising forest resources (assets) and environmental data. The main types of primary forest products included in (1) are: roundwood, sawnwood, wood-based panels, pulp, and paper and paperboard. Secondary products include further processed wood and paper products. These products are presented in greater detail; definitions are available. All of the data are compiled from the Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire (JFSQ), except for table (e), which is directly extracted from Eurostat's international trade database COMEXT (HS/CN Chapter 44). The tables in (1) cover details of the following topics: - Roundwood removals and production by type of wood and assortment (a) - Roundwood production by type of ownership (b) - Production and trade in roundwood, fuelwood and other basic products (c) - Trade in industrial roundwood by assortment and species (d) - Tropical wood imports to the EU from Chapter 44 of the Harmonised System (e) - Production and trade in sawnwood, panels and other primary products (f) - Sawnwood trade by species (g) - Production and trade in pulp and paper & paperboard (h) - Trade in secondary wood and paper products (i) Data in (2) include the output, intermediate consumption, gross value added, fixed capital consumption, gross fixed capital formation and different measures of income of forestry and logging.  The data are in current basic prices and are compatible with National Accounts. They are collected as part of Intergrated environmental and economic accounting for forests (IEEAF), which also covers labour input in annual work units (AWU).  Under (2), two separate tables cover the number of employees of forestry and logging, the manufacture of wood and products of wood and cork, and the manufacture of paper and paper products, as estimated from the Labour Force Survey results. There are two separate tables because of the change in the EU's classification of economic activities from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 in 2008. More detailed information on wood products and accounting, including definitions and questionnaires, can be found on our open-access communication platform under the interest group 'Forestry statistics and accounts'.  Data in (3) are not collected by Eurostat, but by the FAO, UNECE, Forest Euope, the European Commission's departments for Environment and the Joint Research Centre. They include forest area, wood volume, defoliation on sample plots, fires and areas with protective functions.
    • September 2015
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2015
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat's database covers 1) Production and trade in roundwood and wood products, including primary and secondary products 2) Economic data on forestry and logging, including employment data 3) Sustainable forest management, comprising forest resources (assets) and environmental data. The main types of primary forest products included in (1) are: roundwood, sawnwood, wood-based panels, pulp, and paper and paperboard. Secondary products include further processed wood and paper products. These products are presented in greater detail; definitions are available. All of the data are compiled from the Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire (JFSQ), except for table (e), which is directly extracted from Eurostat's international trade database COMEXT (HS/CN Chapter 44). The tables in (1) cover details of the following topics: - Roundwood removals and production by type of wood and assortment (a) - Roundwood production by type of ownership (b) - Production and trade in roundwood, fuelwood and other basic products (c) - Trade in industrial roundwood by assortment and species (d) - Tropical wood imports to the EU from Chapter 44 of the Harmonised System (e) - Production and trade in sawnwood, panels and other primary products (f) - Sawnwood trade by species (g) - Production and trade in pulp and paper & paperboard (h) - Trade in secondary wood and paper products (i) Data in (2) include the output, intermediate consumption, gross value added, fixed capital consumption, gross fixed capital formation and different measures of income of forestry and logging.  The data are in current basic prices and are compatible with National Accounts. They are collected as part of Intergrated environmental and economic accounting for forests (IEEAF), which also covers labour input in annual work units (AWU).  Under (2), two separate tables cover the number of employees of forestry and logging, the manufacture of wood and products of wood and cork, and the manufacture of paper and paper products, as estimated from the Labour Force Survey results. There are two separate tables because of the change in the EU's classification of economic activities from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 in 2008. More detailed information on wood products and accounting, including definitions and questionnaires, can be found on our open-access communication platform under the interest group 'Forestry statistics and accounts'.  Data in (3) are not collected by Eurostat, but by the FAO, UNECE, Forest Euope, the European Commission's departments for Environment and the Joint Research Centre. They include forest area, wood volume, defoliation on sample plots, fires and areas with protective functions.
  • S
    • February 2014
      Source: General Authority for Statistics, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 February, 2014
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      Detail on Foreign Trade
    • April 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 April, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Eurostat's database covers 1) Production and trade in roundwood and wood products, including primary and secondary products 2) Economic data on forestry and logging, including employment data 3) Sustainable forest management, comprising forest resources (assets) and environmental data. The main types of primary forest products included in (1) are: roundwood, sawnwood, wood-based panels, pulp, and paper and paperboard. Secondary products include further processed wood and paper products. These products are presented in greater detail; definitions are available. All of the data are compiled from the Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire (JFSQ), except for table (e), which is directly extracted from Eurostat's international trade database COMEXT (HS/CN Chapter 44). The tables in (1) cover details of the following topics: - Roundwood removals and production by type of wood and assortment (a) - Roundwood production by type of ownership (b) - Production and trade in roundwood, fuelwood and other basic products (c) - Trade in industrial roundwood by assortment and species (d) - Tropical wood imports to the EU from Chapter 44 of the Harmonised System (e) - Production and trade in sawnwood, panels and other primary products (f) - Sawnwood trade by species (g) - Production and trade in pulp and paper & paperboard (h) - Trade in secondary wood and paper products (i) Data in (2) include the output, intermediate consumption, gross value added, fixed capital consumption, gross fixed capital formation and different measures of income of forestry and logging.  The data are in current basic prices and are compatible with National Accounts. They are collected as part of Intergrated environmental and economic accounting for forests (IEEAF), which also covers labour input in annual work units (AWU).  Under (2), two separate tables cover the number of employees of forestry and logging, the manufacture of wood and products of wood and cork, and the manufacture of paper and paper products, as estimated from the Labour Force Survey results. There are two separate tables because of the change in the EU's classification of economic activities from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 in 2008. More detailed information on wood products and accounting, including definitions and questionnaires, can be found on our open-access communication platform under the interest group 'Forestry statistics and accounts'.  Data in (3) are not collected by Eurostat, but by the FAO, UNECE, Forest Euope, the European Commission's departments for Environment and the Joint Research Centre. They include forest area, wood volume, defoliation on sample plots, fires and areas with protective functions.
    • January 2016
      Source: National Science Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 April, 2016
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      Data collected from table 5-55 to 5-57
    • April 2016
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 April, 2016
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      Eurostat's database covers 1) Production and trade in roundwood and wood products, including primary and secondary products 2) Economic data on forestry and logging, including employment data 3) Sustainable forest management, comprising forest resources (assets) and environmental data. The main types of primary forest products included in (1) are: roundwood, sawnwood, wood-based panels, pulp, and paper and paperboard. Secondary products include further processed wood and paper products. These products are presented in greater detail; definitions are available. All of the data are compiled from the Joint Forest Sector Questionnaire (JFSQ), except for table (e), which is directly extracted from Eurostat's international trade database COMEXT (HS/CN Chapter 44). The tables in (1) cover details of the following topics: - Roundwood removals and production by type of wood and assortment (a) - Roundwood production by type of ownership (b) - Production and trade in roundwood, fuelwood and other basic products (c) - Trade in industrial roundwood by assortment and species (d) - Tropical wood imports to the EU from Chapter 44 of the Harmonised System (e) - Production and trade in sawnwood, panels and other primary products (f) - Sawnwood trade by species (g) - Production and trade in pulp and paper & paperboard (h) - Trade in secondary wood and paper products (i) Data in (2) include the output, intermediate consumption, gross value added, fixed capital consumption, gross fixed capital formation and different measures of income of forestry and logging.  The data are in current basic prices and are compatible with National Accounts. They are collected as part of Intergrated environmental and economic accounting for forests (IEEAF), which also covers labour input in annual work units (AWU).  Under (2), two separate tables cover the number of employees of forestry and logging, the manufacture of wood and products of wood and cork, and the manufacture of paper and paper products, as estimated from the Labour Force Survey results. There are two separate tables because of the change in the EU's classification of economic activities from NACE Rev. 1.1 to NACE Rev. 2 in 2008. More detailed information on wood products and accounting, including definitions and questionnaires, can be found on our open-access communication platform under the interest group 'Forestry statistics and accounts'.  Data in (3) are not collected by Eurostat, but by the FAO, UNECE, Forest Euope, the European Commission's departments for Environment and the Joint Research Centre. They include forest area, wood volume, defoliation on sample plots, fires and areas with protective functions.
    • November 2015
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2015
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      Full Name: Activities of U.S. Multinational Enterprises (MNEs), Selected Data for Foreign Affiliates in All Countries in Which Investment Was Reported
    • November 2015
      Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 December, 2015
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      Full Name: Activities of U.S. Multinational Enterprises (MNEs), Selected Data for Majority-Owned Foreign Affiliates in All Countries in Which Investment Was Reported
    • December 2013
      Source: IndexMundi
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 December, 2013
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      Sheath Contraceptives of Vulcanised Rubber Exports
    • October 2016
      Source: Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 November, 2016
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      Note: Actual data is from 1998 to 2015 and Foretasted data is from 2016 to 2020.   The SIFMA Fact Book is an annual reference containing comprehensive data on the securities industry, capital markets, market activity, investor participation, global markets, savings and investment, and much more. The Fact Book - used frequently by industry 
    • June 2016
      Source: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 June, 2016
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      Military expenditure in local currency at current prices is presented according to the financial year of each country. Figures in constant (2014) US$ and as a share of GDP are present according to calendar year, calculated on the assumption that, where financial years do not correspond to calendar years, spending is distributed evenly through the year. SIPRI military expenditure data is based on open sources only, including a SIPRI questionnaire which is sent out annually to all countries included in the database. The collected data is processed to achieve consistent time series which are, as far as possible, in accordance with the SIPRI definition of military expenditure, detailed in the sources and methods.
    • August 2015
      Source: Scimago Lab
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 August, 2015
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    • June 2014
      Source: Scimago Lab
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 June, 2014
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      The SIR reports are not league tables. The ranking parameter –the scientific output of institutions- should be understood as a default rank, not our ranking proposal. The only goal of this report is to characterize research outcomes of organizations so as to provide useful scientometric information to institutions, policymakers and research manager so they are able to analyze, evaluate and improve their research results. If someone uses this report to rank institutions or to build a league table with any purpose, he/she will do it under his/her own responsibility. Output - Total number of documents published in scholarly journals indexed in Scopus (Romo-Fernández, et al., 2011). International Collaboration - Institution's output ratio produced in collaboration with foreign institutions. The values are computed by analyzing an institution's output whose affiliations include more than one country address (Guerrero-Bote, Olmeda-Gómez and Moya-Anegón, 2013; Lancho-Barrantes, Guerrero-Bote and Moya-Anegón, 2013; Lancho-Barrantes, et al., 2013; Chinchilla-Rodríguez, et al., 2012) Normalized Impact - Normalized Impact is computed using the methodology established by the Karolinska Intitutet in Sweden where it is named "Item oriented field normalized citation score average". The normalization of the citation values is done on an individual article level. The values (in %) show the relationship between an institution's average scientific impact and the world average set to a score of 1, --i.e. a NI score of 0.8 means the institution is cited 20% below world average and 1.3 means the institution is cited 30% above average (Rehn and Kronman, 2008; González-Pereira, Guerrero-Bote and Moya- Anegón, 2011). High Quality Publications - Ratio of publications that an institution publishes in the most influential scholarly journals of the world, those ranked in the first quartile (25%) in their categories as ordered by SCImago Journal Rank (SJRII) indicator (Miguel, Chinchilla-Rodríguez and Moya-Anegón, 2011). Specialization Index - The Specialization Index indicates the extent of thematic concentration /dispersion of an institution’s scientific output. Values range between 0 and 1, indicating generalist vs. specialized institutions respectively. This indicator is computed according to the Gini Index used in Economy (Moed, et. al., 2011; López-Illescas, Moya-Anegón and Moed, 2011; Arencibia-Jorge et al., 2012). In this indicator, when the value is 0 it means that the data are not sufficient to calculate. Excellence Rate - Excellence rate indicates the amount (in %) of an institution’s scientific output that is included into the set of the 10% of the most cited papers in their respective scientific fields. It is a measure of high quality output of research institutions (SCImago Lab, 2011; Bornmann, Moya-Anegón and Leydesdorff, 2012; Guerrero-Bote and Moya-Anegón, 2012). Scientific Leadership - Leadership indicates an institution’s “output as main contributor”, that is the number of papers in which the corresponding author belongs to the institution (Moya-Anegón, 2012; Moya-Anegón et. al, 2013; Moya-Anegón, et al., forthcoming) Excellence with Leadership - Excellence with Leadership indicates the amount of documents in the Excellence rate in which the institution is the main contributor (Moya-Anegón, et al., 2013).
    • February 2016
      Source: Social Progress Imperative
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 September, 2016
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      The Social Progress Index is the result of a two-year process guided by a team of scholars and policy experts. It synthesizes a huge body of research to identify the dimensions of social and environmental performance of societies. The Index incorporates four key design principles: 1. Exclusively social and environmental indicators: our aim is to measure social progress directly, rather than utilize economic proxies. By excluding economic indicators, we can, for the first time, analyze the relationship between economic development (measured for example by GDP per capita) and social development rigorously and systematically. Prior efforts to move “beyond GDP” have commingled social and economic indicators, making it more difficult to disentangle cause and effect. 2. Outcomes not inputs: our aim is to measure the outcomes that matter to the lives of real people. For example, we want to measure the health and wellness achieved by a country, not how much effort is expended nor how much the country spends on healthcare. 3. Actionability: the Index aims to be a practical tool that will help leaders and practitioners in government, business and civil society to implement policies and programs that will drive faster social progress. To achieve that goal, we measure outcomes in a granular way that links to practice. The Index has been structured around 12 components and 54 distinct indicators. The framework allows us to not only provide an aggregate country score and ranking, but also supports granular analyses of specific areas of strength and weakness. Transparency of measurement using a comprehensive framework helps change-makers identify and act upon the most pressing issues in their societies. 4. Relevance to all countries: our aim is to create a holistic measure of social progress that encompasses the health of societies. Most previous efforts have focused on the poorest countries, for understandable reasons. But knowing what constitutes a healthy society for higher-income countries is indispensable in charting a course to get there. These design principles are the foundation for our conceptual framework that defines social progress in an inclusive and comprehensive way. We define social progress as the capacity of a society to meet the basic human needs of its citizens, establish the building blocks that allow citizens and communities to enhance and sustain the quality of their lives, and create the conditions for all individuals to reach their full potential. This definition reflects an extensive and critical review and synthesis of both academic and practitioner literature in a wide range of development topics.