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Denmark

  • Monarch:Margrethe II
  • Prime Minister:Mette Frederiksen
  • Capital city:Copenhagen
  • Languages:Danish, Faroese, Greenlandic (an Inuit dialect), German (small minority) note: English is the predominant second language
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:5,797,446 (2018)
  • Area, sq km:41,990
  • GDP per capita, US$:60,596 (2018)
  • GDP, billion current US$:351.3 (2018)
  • GINI index:No data
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:3

KNESG

All datasets:  A B C E F G H I M O P R S T U V W Y
  • A
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 July, 2019
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      The “ALFS Summary tables” dataset is a subset of the Annual Labour Force Statistics database which presents annual labour force statistics and broad population series for 34 OECD member countries plus Brazil, Columbia and Russian Federation and 4 geographical areas (Major Seven, Euro area, European Union and OECD-Total). Data are presented in thousands of persons, in percentage or as indices with base year 2010=100. This dataset contains estimates from the OECD Secretariat for the latest years when countries did not provide data. These estimates are necessary to compile aggregated statistics for the geographical areas for a complete span of time. Since 2003, employment data by sector for the United States are compiled following the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS); therefore they are not strictly comparable with other countries’ data. Euro area and European Union data were extracted from Eurostat (LFS Series, Detailed annual survey results in New Cronos). Euro area refer to Euro area with 17 countries (geo = ea17). European Union refers to European Union with 27 countries (geo = eu27).
  • B
    • February 2019
      Source: BP
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 May, 2019
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      BP Energy Outlook Charts Data Pack - 2019 edition The Energy Outlook considers different aspects of the energy transition and the key issues and uncertainties these raise.   In all the scenarios considered, world GDP more than doubles by 2040 driven by increasing prosperity in fast-growing developing economies. In the Evolving transition (ET) scenario this improvement in living standards causes energy demand to increase by around a third over the Outlook, driven by India, China and Other Asia which together account for two-thirds of the increase. Despite this increase in energy demand, around two-thirds of the world’s population in 2040 still live in countries where average energy consumption per head is relatively low, highlighting the need for ‘more energy’. Energy consumed within industry and buildings accounts for around three-quarters of the increase in energy demand. Growth in transport demand slows sharply relative to the past, as gains in vehicle efficiency accelerate. The share of passenger vehicle kilometres powered by electricity increases to around 25% by 2040, supported by the growing importance of fully-autonomous cars and shared-mobility services.
    • March 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: The World Bank https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ Topic: Jobs Publication: https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/jobs License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   The World Bank Jobs Statistics Over 150 indicators on labor-related topics, covering over 200 economies from 1990 to present.
  • C
    • July 2019
      Source: End Coal
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 September, 2019
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      Data cited at: End Coal https://endcoal.org/ Topic: Coal Plants by country Publication URL: https://endcoal.org/global-coal-plant-tracker/summary-statistics/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
    • January 2019
      Source: Transparency International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 February, 2019
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      Data cited at CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX 2018 by Transparency International is licensed under CC-BY-ND 4.0. Global Corruption Barometer is the largest world-wide public opinion survey on corruption. see more at https://www.transparency.org/cpi2018 Transparency International(TI) defines corruption as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. This definition encompasses corrupt practices in both the public and private sectors. The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranks countries according to the perception of corruption in the public sector. The CPI is an aggregate indicator that combines different sources of information about corruption, making it possible to compare countries. The CPI ranks almost 200 countries by their perceived levels of corruption, as determined by expert assessments and opinion surveys.
  • E
    • October 2018
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 08 August, 2019
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      EU Energy in figures 2010, CO2 Emissions by Sector and from Transport by mode.
    • October 2019
      Source: International Labour Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 October, 2019
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      The employed comprise all persons of working age who, during a specified brief period, were in one of the following categories: a) paid employment (whether at work or with a job but not at work); or b) self-employment (whether at work or with an enterprise but not at work).
    • October 2019
      Source: International Labour Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 October, 2019
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      The employed comprise all persons of working age who, during a specified brief period, were in the following categories: a) paid employment (whether at work or with a job but not at work); or b) self-employment (whether at work or with an enterprise but not at work). Data are disaggregated by economic activity according to the latest version of the International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities (ISIC) available for that year, and presented for categories at the 2-digit level of the classification. Economic activity refers to the main activity of the establishment in which a person worked during the reference period and does not depend on the specific duties or functions of the person's job, but on the characteristics of the economic unit in which this person works.
    • January 2018
      Source: Yale Center for Environmental Law & Policy
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 February, 2018
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      Data cited at: Wendling, Z. A., Emerson, J. W., Esty, D. C., Levy, M. A., de Sherbinin, A., et al. (2018). 2018 Environmental Performance Index. New Haven, CT: Yale Center for Environmental Law & Policy. https://epi.yale.edu/   The Environmental Performance Index (EPI) is constructed through the calculation and aggregation of 20 indicators reflecting national-level environmental data. These indicators are combined into nine issue categories, each of which fit under one of two overarching objectives. The two objectives that provide the overarching structure of the EPI are Environmental Health and Ecosystem Vitality. Environmental Health measures the protection of human health from environmental harm. Ecosystem Vitality measures ecosystem protection and resource management. These two objectives are further divided into nine issue categories that span high-priority environmental policy issues, including air quality, forests, fisheries, and climate and energy, among others. The issue categories are extensive but not comprehensive. Underlying the nine issue categories are 20 indicators calculated from country-level data and statistics. After more than 15 years of work on environmental performance measurement and six iterations of the EPI, global data are still lacking on a number of key environmental issues. These include: freshwater quality, toxic chemical exposures, municipal solid waste management, nuclear safety, wetlands loss, agricultural soil quality and degradation, recycling rates, adaptation, vulnerability, and resiliency to climate change, desertification.
    • July 2019
      Source: European Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 August, 2019
      Select Dataset
      EC GHG Emissions by Sector and from Transport by mode
  • F
    • December 2016
      Source: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 May, 2017
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      World and National CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Cement Manufacture, and Gas Flaring. Source: Tom Boden, Gregg Marland and Bob Andres (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)
    • April 2019
      Source: Fund for Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 May, 2019
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      Data cited at: Fragile States Index - https://fragilestatesindex.org/ The FSI focuses on the indicators of risk and is based on thousands of articles and reports that are processed by our CAST Software from electronically available sources. Measures of fragility, like Demographic Pressures,Refugees and IDPs and etc., have been scaled on 0 to 10 where 10 is highest fragility and 0 no fragility.
    • December 2018
      Source: Freedom House
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 March, 2019
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      Freedom in the World is Freedom House’s flagship annual report, assessing the condition of political rights and civil liberties around the world. It is composed of numerical ratings and supporting descriptive texts for many countries. Freedom in the World has been published since 1973, allowing Freedom House to track global trends in freedom over more than 40 years. It has become the most widely read and cited report of its kind, used on a regular basis by policymakers, journalists, academics, activists, and many others.
  • G
    • November 2018
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 November, 2018
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      The Global Burden of Disease Study 2017 (GBD 2017), coordinated by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), estimated the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors for 195 countries and territories and at the subnational level for a subset of countries. Developed by GBD researchers and used to help produce these estimates, the Socio-demographic Index (SDI) is a composite indicator of development status strongly correlated with health outcomes. It is the geometric mean of 0 to 1 indices of total fertility rate under the age of 25 (TFU25), mean education for those ages 15 and older (EDU15+), and lag distributed income (LDI) per capita. As a composite, a location with an SDI of 0 would have a theoretical minimum level of development relevant to health, while a location with an SDI of 1 would have a theoretical maximum level. This dataset provides tables with SDI values for all estimated GBD 2017 locations for 1950–2017 and groupings by location based on their 2017 values.
    • December 2018
      Source: Global Carbon Atlas
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: Global Carbon Atlas - http://www.globalcarbonatlas.org/en/CO2-emissions The Global Carbon Project facilitates access to data to encourage its use and promote a good understanding of the carbon cycle. Respecting original data sources is key to help secure the support of data providers to enhance, maintain and update valuable data.  FOSSIL FUEL EMISSIONS CDIAC: Boden, TA, Andres RJ, and Marland, G 2017. Global, Regional, and National Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, Tenn., USA DOI:10.3334/CDIAC/00001_V2017. Available at: http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html  UNFCCC, 2018. National Inventory Submissions 2018. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Available at: http://unfccc.int/process/transparency-and-reporting/reporting-and-review-under-the-convention/greenhouse-gas-inventories-annex-i-parties/national-inventory-submissions-2018, accessed June 2018.  BP, 2018. Statistical Review of World Energy. Available at: http://www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/energy-economics.html 
    • February 2017
      Source: Global Democracy Ranking
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2017
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      The Democracy Ranking 2016 compares the development of quality of democracy in 112 countries during the years 2011-2012 with 2014-2015. It is based on the following dimensions: politics (weighted with 50%), economy (10%), ecology and environment (10%), gender equality (10%), health and health status (10%), and knowledge (10%). The possible values that a country can achieve go from 1 (minimum) to 100 (maximum) (the entire scale is thus 1-100). Rank change: + sign shows improvement in rank and - sign shows deterioration in rank
    • December 2018
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 March, 2019
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      The GEM Adult Population Survey (APS) measures the level and nature of entrepreneurial activity around the world. It is administered to a representative national sample of at least 2000 respondents. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.
    • April 2018
      Source: United Nations Statistics Division
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2018
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      Environmental Indicators disseminate global environment statistics on ten indicator themes compiled from a wide range of data sources. The themes and indicator tables were selected based on the current demands for international environmental statistics and the availability of internationally comparable data. Indicator tables, charts and maps with relatively good quality and coverage across countries, as well as links to other international sources, are provided under each theme. Statistics on Water and Waste are based on official statistics supplied by national statistical offices and/or ministries of environment (or equivalent institutions) in response to the biennial UNSD/UNEP Questionnaire on Environment Statistics, complemented with comparable statistics from OECD and Eurostat, and water resources data from FAO Aqua stat. Statistics on other themes were compiled by UNSD from other international sources. In a few cases, UNSD has made some calculations in order to derive the indicators. However, generally no adjustments have been made to the values received from the source. UNSD is not responsible for the quality, completeness/availability, and validity of the data. Environment statistics is still in an early stage of development in many countries, and data are often sparse. The indicators selected here are those of relatively good quality and geographic coverage. Information on data quality and comparability is given at the end of each table together with other important metadata.
    • December 2018
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 03 January, 2019
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic:  The Global Gender Gap Report 2018 Publication URL: https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-global-gender-gap-report-2018 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode   Gender parity is fundamental to whether and how economies and societies thrive. Ensuring the full development and appropriate deployment of half of the world’s total talent pool has a vast bearing on the growth, competitiveness and future-readiness of economies and businesses worldwide. The Global Gender Gap Report benchmarks 149 countries on their progress towards gender parity across four thematic dimensions: Economic Participation and Opportunity, Educational Attainment, Health and Survival, and Political Empowerment. In addition, this year’s edition studies skills gender gaps related to Artificial Intelligence (AI)
    • November 2018
      Source: Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 February, 2019
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      Direct greenhouse gases: Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Methane (CH4), Nitrous Oxide (N2O), Hydrofluorocarbons (HFC-23, 32, 125, 134a, 143a, 152a, 227ea, 236fa, 245fa, 365mfc, 43-10-mee), Perfluorocarbons (PFCs: CF4, C2F6, C3F8, c-C4F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, C7F16), Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6), Nitrogen Trifluoride (NF3) and Sulfuryl Fluoride (SO2F2). Emissions are calculated by individual countries using country-specific information. The countries are organized in different world regions for illustration purposes. Emissions of some small countries are presented together with other countries depending on country definition and availability of activity statistics. Source: European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC)/PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency.
    • September 2018
      Source: Dual Citizen LLC
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2018
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      The performance index of the 2018 GGEI is defined by 20 underlying indicators, each contained within one of the four main dimensions of leadership & climate change, efficiency sectors, markets & investment and the environment.   For more detail on our approach to aggregating these diverse data sources to define the composite indicators in the GGEI and its four main dimensions, as well as our approach to data selection, weighting and other issues associated with creating an index, please visit the Methodology section.
    • July 2019
      Source: Global Innovation Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 August, 2019
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      The GII is a source of insight into the multidimensional facets of innovation-driven growth. Providing 80 detailed metrics for 129 economies in 2019, the GII has become one of the leading references for measuring an economy’s innovation performance. Moving into its 12th edition this year, the GII has evolved into a valuable benchmarking tool that can facilitate public-private dialogue and where policy-makers, business leaders, and other stakeholders can evaluate innovation progress on an annual basis.   Each year the GII presents a thematic component that tracks global innovation. In this year’s edition, it analyzes the medical innovation landscape of the next decade, looking at how technological and non-technological medical innovation will transform the delivery of healthcare worldwide. It also explores the role and dynamics of medical innovation as it shapes the future of healthcare, and the potential influence this may have on economic growth. 
    • June 2018
      Source: Open Knowledge International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 June, 2018
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    • October 2017
      Source: World Resources Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 September, 2018
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    • June 2019
      Source: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 July, 2019
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  • H
    • June 2018
      Source: OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: OSCE Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights : http://hatecrime.osce.org/what-do-we-know Thirty-nine participating States have submitted some hate crime information to ODIHR for 2017. Of these, 34 provided statistics, while 23 provided statistics that are disaggregated by bias motivation. The official figures are complemented by reports on hate incidents from 124 civil society groups, covering 47 participating States. These contributions amount to 5,843 hate incidents, including 3,265 disaggregated statistical incidents and 2,572 descriptive incidents. This information includes incidents provided by the Holy See, the UNHCR, the IOM and OSCE missions.
    • December 2018
      Source: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 December, 2018
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      Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 (GBD 2016) Healthcare Access and Quality Index Based on Amenable Mortality 1990–2016. Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 (GBD 2016) estimates were used in an analysis of personal healthcare access and quality for 195 countries and territories, as well as selected subnational locations, over time. This dataset includes the following global, regional, national, and selected subnational estimates for 1990-2016: age-standardized risk-standardized death rates from 24 non-cancer causes considered amenable to healthcare; age-standardized mortality-to-incidence ratios for 8 cancers considered amenable to healthcare; and the Healthcare Access and Quality (HAQ) Index and individual scores for each of the 32 causes on a scale of 0 to 100. Code used to produce the estimates is also included. Results were published in The Lancet in May 2018 in "Measuring performance on the Healthcare Access and Quality Index for 195 countries and territories and selected subnational locations: a systematic analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016
    • August 2018
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 December, 2018
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      The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, access to knowledge and a decent standard of living. The HDI is the geometric mean of normalized indices for each of the the three dimensions.
    • April 2016
      Source: Human Mortality Database
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 22 August, 2016
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      Data cited at, 1. https://kapsarc.opendatasoft.com/explore/dataset/population-human-mortality-database  
  • I
    • July 2018
      Source: International Centre for Tax and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 May, 2019
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      Data cited at: ICTD/UNU-WIDER, ‘Government Revenue Dataset’, 2018, https://www.wider.unu.edu/project/government-revenue-dataset' ICTD Government Revenue Dataset, 2018 A major obstacle to cross-country research on the role of revenue and taxation in development has been the weakness of available data. Government Revenue Dataset (GRD), developed through the International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD), is aimed at overcoming this obstacle. It meticulously combines data from several major international databases, as well as drawing on data compiled from all available International Monetary Fund (IMF) Article IV reports. It achieves marked improvements in data coverage and accuracy, including a standardized approach to revenue from natural resources, and holds the promise of significant improvement in the credibility and robustness of research in this area. Dataset contains Central, General and merged government revenue data reported as % of GDP.
    • April 2019
      Source: International Monetary Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 April, 2019
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      The World Economic Outlook (WEO) database contains selected macroeconomic data series from the statistical appendix of the World Economic Outlook report, which presents the IMF staff's analysis and projections of economic developments at the global level, in major country groups and in many individual countries. The WEO is released in April and September/October each year. Use this database to find data on national accounts, inflation, unemployment rates, balance of payments, fiscal indicators, trade for countries and country groups (aggregates), and commodity prices whose data are reported by the IMF. Data are available from 1980 to the present, and projections are given for the next two years. Additionally, medium-term projections are available for selected indicators. For some countries, data are incomplete or unavailable for certain years. Changes to the April 2019 Database:  FYR Macedonia is now called North Macedonia. In February 2019, Zimbabwe adopted a new local currency unit, the RTGS dollar, which has become the official unit of account. Efforts are underway to revise and update all national accounts series to the new RTGS dollar. Current data are based on IMF staff estimates of price and exchange rate developments in US (and RTGS) dollars. Staff estimates of US dollar values may differ from authorities’ estimates.    
    • January 2018
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: World Economic Forum The Inclusive Development Index (IDI) is an annual assessment of 103 countries’ economic performance that measures how countries perform on eleven dimensions of economic progress in addition to GDP. It has 3 pillars; growth and development; inclusion and; intergenerational equity – sustainable stewardship of natural and financial resources. The IDI is a project of the World Economic Forum’s System Initiative on the Future of Economic Progress, which aims to inform and enable sustained and inclusive economic progress through deepened public-private cooperation through thought leadership and analysis, strategic dialogue and concrete cooperation, including by accelerating social impact through corporate action.
  • M
    • October 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 October, 2019
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      The domain "Income and living conditions" covers four topics: people at risk of poverty or social exclusion, income distribution and monetary poverty, living conditions and material deprivation, which are again structured into collections of indicators on specific topics. The collection "People at risk of poverty or social exclusion" houses main indicator on risk of poverty or social inclusion included in the Europe 2020 strategy as well as the intersections between sub-populations of all Europe 2020 indicators on poverty and social exclusion. The collection "Income distribution and monetary poverty" houses collections of indicators relating to poverty risk, poverty risk of working individuals as well as the distribution of income. The collection "Living conditions" hosts indicators relating to characteristics and living conditions of households, characteristics of the population according to different breakdowns, health and labour conditions, housing conditions as well as childcare related indicators. The collection "Material deprivation" covers indicators relating to economic strain, durables, housing deprivation and environment of the dwelling.
    • March 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 March, 2019
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      Data cited at: The World Bank https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/ Topic: Millennium Development Goals Publication: https://datacatalog.worldbank.org/dataset/millennium-development-goals License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   Relevant indicators drawn from the World Development Indicators, reorganized according to the goals and targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs focus the efforts of the world community on achieving significant, measurable improvements in people's lives by the year 2015: they establish targets and yardsticks for measuring development results. Gender Parity Index (GPI)= Value of indicator for Girls/ Value of indicator for Boys. For e.g GPI=School enrolment for Girls/School enrolment for Boys. A value of less than one indicates differences in favor of boys, whereas a value near one (1) indicates that parity has been more or less achieved. The greater the deviation from 1 greater the disparity is.
  • O
  • P
    • December 2018
      Source: Political Terror Scale
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 January, 2019
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      citation: Gib­ney, Mark, Linda Cor­nett, Reed Wood, Peter Hasch­ke, and Daniel Arnon. 2016. The Polit­ic­al Ter­ror Scale 1976-2015. Date Re­trieved, from the Polit­ic­al Ter­ror Scale website: ht­tp://www.polit­ic­al­ter­rorscale.org.   Political Terror Scale Levels 1 - Coun­tries un­der a se­cure rule of law, people are not im­prisoned for their views, and tor­ture is rare or ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murders are ex­tremely rare. 2 - There is a lim­ited amount of im­pris­on­ment for non­vi­ol­ent polit­ic­al activ­ity. However, few per­sons are af­fected, tor­ture and beat­ings are ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murder is rare. 3 - There is ex­tens­ive polit­ic­al im­pris­on­ment, or a re­cent his­tory of such im­pris­on­ment. Ex­e­cu­tion or oth­er polit­ic­al murders and bru­tal­ity may be com­mon. Un­lim­ited de­ten­tion, with or without a tri­al, for polit­ic­al views is ac­cep­ted. 4 - Civil and polit­ic­al rights vi­ol­a­tions have ex­pan­ded to large num­bers of the pop­u­la­tion. Murders, dis­ap­pear­ances, and tor­ture are a com­mon part of life. In spite of its gen­er­al­ity, on this level ter­ror af­fects those who in­terest them­selves in polit­ics or ideas. 5 - Ter­ror has ex­pan­ded to the whole pop­u­la­tion. The lead­ers of these so­ci­et­ies place no lim­its on the means or thor­ough­ness with which they pur­sue per­son­al or ideo­lo­gic­al goals.
    • May 2015
      Source: Earth Policy Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 June, 2015
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      This is part of a supporting dataset for Lester R. Brown, Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2012).
    • July 2019
      Source: Eurostat
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 July, 2019
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      The datasets are composed by baseline population projections and the 'No migration' sensitivity test. Data is available as follows: •           Projected population on 1 January by age and sex, and by single year time interval; •           Assumptions on future age-specific fertility rates, age-specific mortality rates and international net migration levels (including statistical adjustment); •           Corresponding approximated values of the life expectancy by age and sex. Moreover, for the baseline projections, the following demographic balances and indicators are available: •           Total numbers of the projected live births and deaths; •           Projected population structure indicators: proportions of broad age groups in total population, age dependency ratios and median age of the population. The time horizon covered is: 2018 to 2100.
    • October 2019
      Source: International Labour Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2019
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      The share of youth not in education, employment or training (also known as the NEET rate) conveys the number of young persons not in education, employment or training as a percentage of the total youth population. It provides a measure of youth who are outside the educational system, not in training and not in employment, and thus serves as a broader measure of potential youth labour market entrants than youth unemployment, since it also includes young persons outside the labour force not in education or training. This indicator is also a better measure of the current universe of potential youth labour market entrants compared to the youth inactivity rate, as the latter includes those youth who are not in the labour force and are in education, and thus cannot be considered currently available for work. For further information, see the SDG Indicators Metadata Repository or ILOSTAT's indicator description.
  • R
    • July 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 July, 2019
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      The Regional well-being dataset presents eleven dimensions central for well-being at local level and for 395 OECD regions, covering material conditions (income, jobs and housing), quality of life (education, health, environment, safety and access to services) and subjective well-being (social network support and life satisfaction). The set of indicators selected to measure these dimensions is a combination of people's individual attributes and their local conditions, and in most cases, are available over two different years (2000 and 2014). Regions can be easily visualised and compared to other regions through the interactive website [www.oecdregionalwellbeing.org]. The dataset, the website and the publications "Regions at a Glance" and "How’s life in your region?" are outputs designed from the framework for regional and local well-being. The Regional income distribution dataset presents comparable data on sub-national differences in income inequality and poverty for OECD countries. The data by region provide information on income distribution within regions (Gini coefficients and income quintiles), and relative income poverty (with poverty thresholds set in respect of the national population) for 2013. These new data complement international assessments of differences across regions in living conditions by documenting how household income is distributed within regions and how many people are poor relatively to the typical citizen of their country. For analytical purposes, the OECD classifies regions as the first administrative tier of sub-national government, so called Territorial Level 2 or TL2 in the OECD classification. This classification is used by National Statistical Offices to collect information and it represents in many countries the framework for implementing regional policies. Well-being indicators are shown for the 395 TL2 OECD regions, equivalent of the NUTS2 for European countries, with the exception for Estonian where well-being data are presented at a smaller (TL3) level and for the Regional Income dataset, where Greece, Hungary and Poland data are presented at a more aggregated (NUTS1) level.
    • March 2019
      Source: World Justice Project
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 April, 2019
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      Data cited at: The World Justice Project (WJP) The World Justice Project (WJP) Rule of Law Index® is a quantitative assessment tool designed by the World Justice Project to offer a detailed and comprehensive picture of the extent to which countries adhere to the rule of law in practice. Factors of the WJP Rule of Law Index include: 1. Constraints on Government Powers 2. Absence of Corruption 3. Open Government 4. Fundamental Rights 5. Order and Security 6. Regulatory Enforcement 7. Civil Justice 8. Criminal Justice (Data is collected for a 9th factor, Informal Justice, but it is not included in aggregated scores and rankings. This is due to the complexities of these systems and the difficulties in measuring their fairness and effectiveness in a matter that is both systematic and comparable across countries.) Every year WJP collects data from representative samples of the general public and legal professionals to compute the index scores. The data, once collected, are carefully processed to arrive at country-level scores. The respondent level data is first edited to exclude partially-completed surveys, suspicious data, and outliers. Individual answers are then mapped on to the 44 sub-factors of the index. Answers are coded so that all values fall between 0 (least rule of law) and 1 (most rule of law), and aggregated at country level using the simple, or unweighted, average of all respondents. Note: 2012-2013 values given for year 2013 and 2017-2018 given for year 2018.
  • S
    • August 2019
      Source: Scimago Institutions Rankings
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 September, 2019
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      The SCImago Institutions Rankings (SIR) is a classification of academic and research-related institutions ranked by a composite indicator that combines three different sets of indicators based on research performance, innovation outputs and societal impact measured by their web visibility. It provides a friendly interface that allows the visualization of any customized ranking from the combination of these three sets of indicators. Additionally, it is possible to compare the trends for individual indicators of up to six institutions. For each large sector it is also possible to obtain distribution charts of the different indicators.  
    • September 2019
      Source: Social Progress Imperative
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 October, 2019
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        Data cited at: Social Progress Index https://www.socialprogress.org/download The Social Progress Index is a new way to define the success of our societies. It is a comprehensive measure of real quality of life, independent of economic indicators. The Social Progress Index is designed to complement, rather than replace, economic measures such as GDP. Each year, Social Progress Imperative conducts a comprehensive review of all indicators included in the Social Progress Index framework to check data updates (which frequently include retroactive revisions) and whether new indicators have been published that are well-suited to describing social progress concepts. Such a review necessitates a recalculation of previously published versions of the Social Progress Index, as any removal or additions of indicators to the framework or changes due to retroactive revisions in data from the original data sources prevent comparability between previously published versions of the Social Progress Index and the 2019 Social Progress Index. Therefore, using the 2019 Social Progress Index framework and methodology, we provide comparable historical data for additional five years of the Social Progress Index, from 2014 to 2018.
    • October 2018
      Source: Sustainable Governance Indicators
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 05 November, 2018
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      The SGI is a platform built on a cross-national survey of governance that identifies reform needs in 41 EU and OECD countries. The SGI brings together a broad network of experts and practitioners aiming to understand what works best in sustainable governance. Advocating the exchange of best practices, we offer full access to our data set and enable the comparisons that generate innovation in governance.
  • T
    • October 2019
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 October, 2019
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic: The Global Competitiveness Report Publication URL: http://reports.weforum.org/global-competitiveness-report-2019/downloads/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode
    • June 2018
      Source: Walk Free Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 July, 2018
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      The Global Slavery Index, the flagship report of the Walk Free Foundation. The Global Slavery Index estimates the number of people in modern slavery in 167 countries. It is a tool for citizens, non government organisations, businesses and public officials to understand the size of the problem, existing responses and contributing factors, so they can build sound policies that will end modern slavery. The Global Slavery Index answers the following questions: What is the estimated prevalence of modern slavery country by country, and what is the absolute number by population? How are governments tackling modern slavery? What factors explain or predict the prevalence of modern slavery? Government Response Rating by Country A - 70 to 79.9 BBB - 60 to 69.9 BB - 50 to 59.9 B - 40 to 49.9 CCC - 30 to 39.9 CC - 20 to 29.9 C - 10 to 19.9 D - <0 to 9.9
  • U
    • July 2018
      Source: United Nations Public Administration Country Studies
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 August, 2018
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      Data cited at: UN E-Government Knowledgebase - https://publicadministration.un.org/egovkb/en-us/ 1. The EGDI is based on a comprehensive Survey of the online presence of all 193 United Nations Member States, which assesses national websites and how e-government policies and strategies are applied in general and in specific sectors for delivery of essential services. The assessment rates the e-government performance of countries relative to one another as opposed to being an absolute measurement. The results are tabulated and combined with a set of indicators embodying a country’s capacity to participate in the information society, without which e-government development efforts are of limited immediate use. Although the basic model has remained consistent, the precise meaning of these values varies from one edition of the Survey to the next as understanding of the potential of e-government changes and the underlying technology evolves. This is an important distinction because it also implies that it is a comparative framework that seeks to encompass various approaches that may evolve over time instead of advocating a linear path with an absolute goal. 2. E-Government Development Index-EGDI Very High-EGDI (Greater than 0.75) High-EGDI (Between 0.50 and 0.75) Middle-EGDI (Between 0.25 and 0.50) Low-EGDI (Less than 0.25)
    • October 2019
      Source: International Labour Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 October, 2019
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      The unemployed comprise all persons of working age who were: a) without work during the reference period, i.e. were not in paid employment or self-employment; b) currently available for work, i.e. were available for paid employment or self-employment during the reference period; and c) seeking work, i.e. had taken specific steps in a specified recent period to seek paid employment or self-employment. For purposes of international comparability, the period of job search is often defined as the preceding four weeks, but this varies from country to country. The specific steps taken to seek employment may include registration at a public or private employment exchange; application to employers; checking at worksites, farms, factory gates, market or other assembly places; placing or answering newspaper advertisements; seeking assistance of friends or relatives; looking for land, building, machinery or equipment to establish own enterprise; arranging for financial resources; and applying for permits and licences.
    • October 2018
      Source: United Nations Children's Fund
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 December, 2018
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      Millions of children are not protected against Violence, Child labor, Trafficking, Sexual exploitation, Female genital mutilation/cutting, Child marriage and worldwide they experience the worst kinds of rights violations. Millions more children, not yet victims, are inadequately protected against them. UNICEF uses the term ‘Child Protection’ to refer to prevention and response to violence, exploitation and abuse of children in all contexts. This includes reaching children who are especially vulnerable to these threats, such as those living without family care, on the streets or in situations of conflict or natural disasters. Note: Year 2010-2016 is taken as 2016
  • V
    • August 2019
      Source: United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 August, 2019
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      UNODC Assaults, Kidnapping, Robbery, Sexual Offences, Sexual Rape, Total Sexual Violence   Statistics reported to the United Nations in the context of its various surveys on crime levels and criminal justice trends are incidents of victimization that have been reported to the authorities in any given country. That means that this data is subject to the problems of accuracy of all official crime data
  • W
    • July 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 August, 2019
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      Climate change is expected to hit developing countries the hardest. Its effects—higher temperatures, changes in precipitation patterns, rising sea levels, and more frequent weather-related disasters—pose risks for agriculture, food, and water supplies. At stake are recent gains in the fight against poverty, hunger and disease, and the lives and livelihoods of billions of people in developing countries. Addressing climate change requires unprecedented global cooperation across borders. The World Bank Group is helping support developing countries and contributing to a global solution, while tailoring our approach to the differing needs of developing country partners. Data here cover climate systems, exposure to climate impacts, resilience, greenhouse gas emissions, and energy use. Other indicators relevant to climate change are found under other data pages, particularly Environment, Agriculture & Rural Development, Energy & Mining, Health, Infrastructure, Poverty, and Urban Development.
    • October 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2019
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      The primary World Bank collection of development indicators, compiled from officially-recognized international sources. It presents the most current and accurate global development data available, and includes national, regional and global estimates
    • February 2019
      Source: World Energy Council
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 February, 2019
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      The World Energy Council’s Energy Trilemma Index tool, produced in partnership with Oliver Wyman, ranks countries on their ability to provide sustainable energy through 3 dimensions: Energy security, Energy equity (accessibility and affordability), Environmental sustainability. The ranking measures overall performance in achieving a sustainable mix of policies and the balance score highlights how well a country manages the trade-offs of the Trilemma with "A" being the best.
    • August 2019
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 October, 2019
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      The Worldwide Governance Indicators (WGI) project reports aggregate and individual governance indicators for over 200 countries and territories over the period 1996–2018, for six dimensions of governance:Voice and AccountabilityPolitical Stability and Absence of ViolenceGovernment EffectivenessRegulatory QualityRule of LawControl of Corruption The Worldwide Governance Indicators (WGI) are a research dataset summarizing the views on the quality of governance provided by a large number of enterprise, citizen and expert survey respondents in industrial and developing countries. These data are gathered from a number of survey institutes, think tanks, non-governmental organizations, international organizations, and private sector firms. The WGI do not reflect the official views of the World Bank, its Executive Directors, or the countries they represent. The WGI are not used by the World Bank Group to allocate resources. Measure description: Estimate:-Estimate of governance (ranges from approximately -2.5 (weak) to 2.5 (strong) governance performance) Standard error (StdErr):-Standard error reflects variability around the point estimate of governance. Number of sources (NumSrc):-Number of data sources on which estimate is based Rank:-Percentile rank among all countries (ranges from 0 (lowest) to 100 (highest) rank) Lower:-Lower bound of 90% confidence interval for governance, in percentile rank terms Upper:-Upper bound of 90% confidence interval for governance, in percentile rank terms
  • Y
    • October 2019
      Source: International Labour Organization
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 October, 2019
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      For statistical purposes, youth are defined as persons between the ages of 15 and 24 years. Youth not in education are those who were neither enrolled in school nor in a formal training program (e.g. vocational training) during a specified reference period (e.g., one week).

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