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Equatorial Guinea

  • President:Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo
  • Prime Minister:Francisco Pascual Eyegue Obama Asue
  • Capital city:Malabo
  • Languages:Spanish (official) 67.6%, other (includes French (official), Fang, Bubi) 32.4% (1994 census)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:1,267,689 (2017)
  • Area, sq km:28,050 (2017)
  • GDP per capita, US$:9,850 (2017)
  • GDP, billion current US$:12.5 (2017)
  • GINI index:No data
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:173 (2017)
All datasets:  3 B C D E F G H I L M O P Q R S T W
  • 3
    • October 2016
      Source: Philipps-University of Marburg, Empirical Institutional Economics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2016
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      The 3P Anti-trafficking Policy Index evaluates governmental anti-trafficking efforts in the three main policy dimensions (3Ps), based on the requirements prescribed by the United Nations Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (2000).   The three main policy dimensions (3Ps) are:Prosecution of perpetrators of human traffickingPrevention of human traffickingProtection of the victims of human trafficking Each of the 3P areas is evaluated on a 5-point scale and each index is aggregated to the overall 3P Anti-trafficking Index as the  sum (score 3-15).Prosecution Index Score: 1 (no compliance) - 5 (full compliance)Prevention Index Score: 1 (no compliance) - 5 (full compliance)Protection Index Score: 1 (no compliance) - 5 (full compliance)3P Anti-trafficking Policy Index Score: 3 (no compliance for any of the three areas) - 15 (full compliance for all of the three areas) The 3P Anti-trafficking Policy Index is available for each country and each year and currently includes up to 189 countries for the preiod from 2000 to 2015.
  • B
    • April 2017
      Source: Bloom Consulting
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 May, 2017
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      Bloom Consulting was founded in 2003 as a Nation Branding consultancy. Our Headquarters are located in Madrid, with offices in Lisbon and São Paulo. Bloom Consulting has been interviewed by The Economist, Forbes and CNN . According to Country Branding Central www.countrybrandingwiki.org, our CEO José Filipe Torres, a recurrent lecturer in Universities such as Harvard, is considered one of the top 3 international experts in the field of Nation Branding, Region and City Branding, providing advisory for the OECD. In addition, Bloom Consulting publishes the Bloom Consulting Country Brand Ranking © annually for both Trade and Tourism, to extensively analyze the brand performance of 193 countries and territories worldwide and the Digital Country Index - Measuring the Brand appeal of countries and territories in the Digital World.
  • C
    • January 2019
      Source: Transparency International
      Uploaded by: Pallavi S
      Accessed On: 01 February, 2019
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      Data cited at CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX 2018 by Transparency International is licensed under CC-BY-ND 4.0. Global Corruption Barometer is the largest world-wide public opinion survey on corruption. see more at https://www.transparency.org/cpi2018 Transparency International(TI) defines corruption as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. This definition encompasses corrupt practices in both the public and private sectors. The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranks countries according to the perception of corruption in the public sector. The CPI is an aggregate indicator that combines different sources of information about corruption, making it possible to compare countries. The CPI ranks almost 200 countries by their perceived levels of corruption, as determined by expert assessments and opinion surveys.
  • D
    • May 2007
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2015
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      The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) is the only index that includes price data for 181 economies, which is vital in assessing effective market demand. The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) has been designed to as a tool for tracking progress in bridging the digital divide and the implementa- tion of the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS). As such, it provides a powerful policy tool for exploring the global and regional trends in infrastructure, opportu- nity and usage that are shaping the Information Society.
  • E
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Misha Gusev
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      Calculated using Mean Years of Schooling and Expected Years of Schooling.
  • F
    • May 2018
      Source: Fund for Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 May, 2018
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      The FSI focuses on the indicators of risk and is based on thousands of articles and reports that are processed by our CAST Software from electronically available sources. Measures of fragility, like Demographic Pressures,Refugees and IDPs and etc., have been scaled on 0 to 10 where 10 is highest fragility and 0 no fragility.
  • G
    • March 2019
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 March, 2019
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      The GID-DB is a database providing researchers and policymakers with key data on gender-based discrimination in social institutions. This data helps analyse women’s economic empowerment and understand gender gaps in other key areas of development. Covering 160 countries, the GID-DB contains comprehensive information on legal, cultural and traditional practices that discriminate against women and girls.
    • October 2015
      Source: HelpAge International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2015
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      The aim of the Index is both to capture the multidimensional nature of the quality of life and wellbeing of older people, and to provide a means by which to measure performance and promote improvements. We have chosen 13 different indicators for the four key domains of Income security, Health status, Capability, and Enabling environment. Domain 1: Income security The income security domain assesses people's access to a sufficient amount of income, and the capacity to use it independently, in order to meet basic needs in older age. Domain 2: Health status The three indicators used for the health domain provide information about physical and psychological wellbeing. Domain 3: Capability The employment and education indicators in this domain look at different aspects of the empowerment of older people. Domain 4: Enabling environment This domain uses data from Gallup World View to assess older people's perception of social connectedness, safety, civic freedom and access to public transport - issues older people have singled out as particularly important.
    • July 2017
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 13 September, 2017
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        The Global Cybersecurity Index (GCI) is a survey that measures the commitment of Member States to cybersecurity in order to raise awareness. The GCI revolves around the ITU Global Cybersecurity Agenda (GCA) and its five pillars (legal, technical, organizational, capacity building and cooperation). For each of these pillars, questions were developed to assess commitment. Through consultation with a group of experts, these questions were weighted in order to arrive at an overall GCI score. The survey was administered through an online platform through which supporting evidence was also collected. One-hundred and thirty-four Member States responded to the survey throughout 2016. Member States who did not respond were invited to validate responses determined from open-source research. As such, the GCI results reported herein cover all 193 ITU Member States. The 2017 publication of the GCI continues to show the commitment to cybersecurity of countries around the world. The overall picture shows improvement and strengthening of all five elements of the cybersecurity agenda in various countries in all regions. However, there is space for further improvement in cooperation at all levels, capacity building and organizational measures. As well, the gap in the level of cybersecurity engagement between different regions is still present and visible. The level of development of the different pillars varies from country to country in the regions, and while commitment in Europe remains very high in the legal and technical fields in particular, the challenging situation in the Africa and Americas regions shows the need for continued engagement and support. In addition to providing the GCI score, this report also provides a set of illustrative practices that give insight into the achievements of certain countries.
    • September 2018
      Source: Dual Citizen LLC
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2018
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      The performance index of the 2018 GGEI is defined by 20 underlying indicators, each contained within one of the four main dimensions of leadership & climate change, efficiency sectors, markets & investment and the environment.   For more detail on our approach to aggregating these diverse data sources to define the composite indicators in the GGEI and its four main dimensions, as well as our approach to data selection, weighting and other issues associated with creating an index, please visit the Methodology section.
    • October 2018
      Source: International Food Policy Research Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 October, 2018
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      Global Hunger Index, 2018   The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is a tool designed to comprehensively measure and track hunger globally, regionally, and by country. Each year, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) calculates GHI scores in order to assess progress, or the lack thereof, in decreasing hunger. The GHI is designed to raise awareness and understanding of regional and country differences in the struggle against hunger. Since 2015, GHI scores have been calculated using a revised and improved formula. The revision replaces child underweight, previously the sole indicator of child under-nutrition, with two indicators of child under-nutrition—child wasting and child stunting—which are equally weighted in the GHI calculation. The revised formula also standardizes each of the component indicators to balance their contribution to the overall index and to changes in the GHI scores over time. GHI scores are calculated using a three-step process that draws on available data from various sources to capture the multidimensional nature of hunger: 1. Undernourishment: The share of the population that is undernourished (that is, whose caloric intake is insufficient). 2. Child wasting and stunting: The share of children under the age of five who are wasted (that is, who have low weight for their height, reflecting acute under-nutrition). 3.Child Stunting: The share of children under the age of five who are stunted (that is, who have low height for their age, reflecting chronic under-nutrition). 4. Child Mortality: The mortality rate of children under the age of five (in part, a reflection of the fatal mix of inadequate nutrition and unhealthy environments).   Note: Values for the years are taken as per below table.1Global Hunger Index Scores2Proportion of Undernourished in the Population (%)3Prevalence of Wasting in Children Under Five Years(%)4Prevalence of Stunting in Children Under Five Years (%)5Prevalence of underweight in children under five years (%)   Date for above indicators are taken as per below year ranges. 1   2   3   4   5   Date Range Date Range Date Range Date Range Date Range 2018 2013-2017 2018 2015-2017 2018 2013-2017 2018 2013-2017 2012 2009-2013 2017 2012-2016 2017 2014-2016 2017 2012-2016 2017 2012-2016 2011 2008-2012 2015 2010-2016 2015 2014-2016 2015 2012-2016 2015 2012-2016 2010 2005-2010 2014 2009-2013 2013 2014-2016 2013 2010-2014 2013 2010-2014 2009 2004-2009 2013 2008-2012 2012 2011-2013 2010 2008-2012 2010 2008-2012 2008 2003-2008 2012 2005-2010 2011 2010-2012 2008 2006-2010 2008 2006-2010 2007 2002-2007 2011 2004-2009 2010 2009-2011 2005 2003-2007 2005 2003-2007 2006 2001-2006 2010 2008-2012 2009 2005-2007 2000 1998-2002 2000 1998-2002 2005 2003-2007 2009 2002-2007 2008 2007-2009 1995 1993-1997 1995 1993-1997 2004 2000-2005 2008 2006-2010 2007 2003-2005 1992 1990-1994 1992 1990-1994 2003 1999-2003 2005 2003-2007 2006 2002-2004 1990 1988-1992 1990 1988-1992 2000 1998-2002 2001 1994-1998 2005 2004-2006         1997 1993-1998 2000 1998-2002 2004 2001-2003         1995 1993-1997 1996 1988-1992 2003 2000-2002         1990 1988-1992 1995 1993-1997 2000 1999-2001         1980 1977-1982 1992 1990-1994 1997 1995-1997             1990 1988-1992 1995 1994-1996                 1992 1991-1993                 1990 1990-1992                 1980 1979-1981               6. "Under-five Mortality  Rate(%)" year range has not been specified in source. GHI Severity Scale ≤ 9.9 low 10.0–19.9 moderate 20.0–34.9 serious 35.0–49.9 alarming 50.0 ≤ extremely alarming
  • H
    • August 2018
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 December, 2018
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      The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, access to knowledge and a decent standard of living. The HDI is the geometric mean of normalized indices for each of the the three dimensions.
  • I
    • February 2019
      Source: Heritage Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 February, 2019
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      Data cited at: Heritage Foundation   Economic freedom is the fundamental right of every human to control his or her own labor and property. In an economically free society, individuals are free to work, produce, consume, and invest in any way they please, with that freedom both protected by the state and unconstrained by the state. In economically free societies, governments allow labor, capital and goods to move freely, and refrain from coercion or constraint of liberty beyond the extent necessary to protect and maintain liberty itself. Economic Freedom Scores: Range and level of freedom 80–100:- Free 70–79.9:- Mostly Free 60–69.9:- Moderately Free 50–59.9:- Mostly Unfree 0–49.9:- Repressed
  • L
    • May 2018
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 August, 2018
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      The Logistics Performance Index overall score reflects assessments of a country's logistics based on efficiency of the customs clearance process, quality of trade- and transport-related infrastructure, ease of arranging competitively priced shipments, quality of logistics services, ability to track and trace consignments, and frequency with which shipments reach the consignee within the scheduled time. The index ranges from 1 to 5, with a higher score representing better performance. Data are from Logistics Performance Index surveys conducted by the World Bank in partnership with academic and international institutions and private companies and individuals engaged in international logistics. 2011 round of surveys covered more than 6,000 country assessments by nearly 1,000 international freight forwarders. Respondents evaluated eight markets on six core dimensions using a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best). The markets are chosen based on the most important export and import markets of the respondent's country, random selection, and, for landlocked countries, neighboring countries that connect them with international markets. Scores for the six areas are averaged across all respondents and aggregated to a single score using principal components analysis. Details of the survey methodology and index construction methodology are in Connecting to Compete 2012: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy (2012).
  • M
    • December 2018
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 December, 2018
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      This Dataset contains Indicators related to IC Development Index and Tables from "Measuring the Information Society Report 2018, Volume 1" For Indicators for other ICT Development data please refer: https://knoema.com/ITUKIICT2019/global-ict-developments
  • O
  • P
    • December 2018
      Source: Passport Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 December, 2018
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      Passport Index is an interactive tool, which collects, displays and ranks the passports of the world. You can discover the world’s passports on a map, by country name, by Passport Power Rank and even by the color of their cover. Visa Free Score Passports accumulate points for each visa free country that their holders can visit without a visa, or they can obtain a visa on arrival. Passport Power Rank Passports are ranked based on their Visa Free Score. The higher the Visa Free Score, the better the Passport Power Rank. Methodology The country list is based on the 193 UN member countries and 6 territories (Macao, Kosovo, etc.) for a total of 199. Territories annexed to other countries such as Norfolk Island, French Polynesia, etc. are excluded. Data is based on research from publicly available sources, as well as information shared by government agencies.
    • December 2018
      Source: Political Terror Scale
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 January, 2019
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      citation: Gib­ney, Mark, Linda Cor­nett, Reed Wood, Peter Hasch­ke, and Daniel Arnon. 2016. The Polit­ic­al Ter­ror Scale 1976-2015. Date Re­trieved, from the Polit­ic­al Ter­ror Scale website: ht­tp://www.polit­ic­al­ter­rorscale.org.   Political Terror Scale Levels 1 - Coun­tries un­der a se­cure rule of law, people are not im­prisoned for their views, and tor­ture is rare or ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murders are ex­tremely rare. 2 - There is a lim­ited amount of im­pris­on­ment for non­vi­ol­ent polit­ic­al activ­ity. However, few per­sons are af­fected, tor­ture and beat­ings are ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murder is rare. 3 - There is ex­tens­ive polit­ic­al im­pris­on­ment, or a re­cent his­tory of such im­pris­on­ment. Ex­e­cu­tion or oth­er polit­ic­al murders and bru­tal­ity may be com­mon. Un­lim­ited de­ten­tion, with or without a tri­al, for polit­ic­al views is ac­cep­ted. 4 - Civil and polit­ic­al rights vi­ol­a­tions have ex­pan­ded to large num­bers of the pop­u­la­tion. Murders, dis­ap­pear­ances, and tor­ture are a com­mon part of life. In spite of its gen­er­al­ity, on this level ter­ror af­fects those who in­terest them­selves in polit­ics or ideas. 5 - Ter­ror has ex­pan­ded to the whole pop­u­la­tion. The lead­ers of these so­ci­et­ies place no lim­its on the means or thor­ough­ness with which they pur­sue per­son­al or ideo­lo­gic­al goals.
  • Q
    • January 2019
      Source: Quality of Government Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 February, 2019
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      Data cited at: The Quality of Government Institute; Teorell, Jan, Stefan Dahlberg, Sören Holmberg, Bo Rothstein, Natalia Alvarado Pachon & Richard Svensson. 2018. The Quality of Government Standard Dataset, version Jan18. University of Gothenburg: The Quality of Government Institute, http://www.qog.pol.gu.se doi:10.18157/QoGStdJan18   In the QoG Standard TS dataset, data from 1946 to 2018 is included and the unit of analysis is country-year (e.g. Sweden-1946, Sweden-1947 and so on).    
  • R
  • S
    • August 2018
      Source: Social Progress Imperative
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 November, 2018
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      The Social Progress Index is a new way to define the success of our societies. It is a comprehensive measure of real quality of life, independent of economic indicators. The Social Progress Index is designed to complement, rather than replace, economic measures such as GDP. Each year, Social Progress Imperative conducts a comprehensive review of all indicators included in the Social Progress Index framework to check data updates (which frequently include retroactive revisions) and whether new indicators have been published that are well-suited to describing social progress concepts. Such a review necessitates a recalculation of previously published versions of the Social Progress Index, as any removal or additions of indicators to the framework or changes due to retroactive revisions in data from the original data sources prevent comparability between previously published versions of the Social Progress Index and the 2018 Social Progress Index. Therefore, using the 2018 Social Progress Index framework and methodology, we provide comparable historical data for four additional years of the Social Progress Index, from 2014 to 2017. To read more about our methodology, please see the 2018 Methodology here https://www.socialprogress.org/index/methodology
  • T
    • November 2015
      Source: Save the Children Federation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2015
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    • February 2015
      Source: University of Keele
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 April, 2015
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      This water poverty index is a first pass at trying to establish an international measure comparing performance in the water sector across countries in a holistic way that brings in the diverse aspects and issues that are relevant. It does seem to give some sensible results but it does not pretend to be definitive nor offer a totally accurate measure of the situation.
    • June 2018
      Source: Pew Research Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 August, 2018
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      Levels of restrictions on religion Government Restrictions Index Very high- 6.6 to 10.0 High- 4.5 to 6.5 Moderate - 2.4 to 4.4 Low- 0.0 to 2.3 Social Hostilities Index Very high- 7.2 to 10.0 High- 3.6 to 7.1 Moderate- 1.5 to 3.5 Low- 0.0 to 1.4
  • W
    • October 2012
      Source: World Wide Fund for Nature
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 February, 2016
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      Domestic ivory market score: Scores range from –4, indicating no or very small, highly-regulated domestic ivory markets and carving industries, to 20, indicating extremely large, completely unregulated domestic ivory markets and carving industries. As described in CoP13 Doc.29,2 Annex, this component is based upon a cumulative scoring system which tracks the relative scale of the retail-level trade, the degree of control over such trade, and the status of ivory carving. Law enforcement effort ratio: Number of in-country seizures divided by total number of seizures linked to that country 1999-2010. Total weight of recent ivory seizures: Total weight of ivory seizures linked to that country 1999-2010. Organized crime indicator: Percentage of seizure cases linked to that country 1999-2010 of more than 1,000 kg in weight, indicative of involvement of organized crime in the movement of ivory.
    • October 2018
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 31 October, 2018
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      Note: In recent years, Doing Business introduced improvements to all of its indicator sets. In Doing Business 2015, Resolving Insolvency introduced new measures of quality, while Getting Credit and Protecting Minority Investors broadened their existing measures. In Doing Business 2016, Dealing with Construction Permits, Getting Electricity, Registering Property and Enforcing Contracts also introduced new measures of quality, and Trading across Borders introduced a new case scenario to increase the economic relevance. In Doing Business 2017, Paying Taxes introduced new measures of post-filing processes and Starting a Business, Registering Property and Enforcing Contracts added gender components. For the details on the Doing Business methodology changes, please view the Ease of Doing Business metrics. Each methodology expansion was recalculated for one year to provide comparable indicator values and scores for the previous year. Rankings are calculated for Doing Business 2019 only. Year-to-year changes in the number of economies, number of indicators and methodology affect the comparability of prior years.
    • May 2018
      Source: Reporters Without Borders
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 May, 2018
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      The press freedom index that Reporters Without Borders publishes every year measures the level of freedom of information in nearly 180 countries. It reflects the degree of freedom that journalists, news organizations and netizens enjoy in each country, and the efforts made by the authorities to respect and ensure respect for this freedom. It is based partly on a questionnaire that is sent to our partner organizations (18 freedom of expression NGOs located in all five continents), to our network of 150 correspondents, and to journalists, researchers, jurists and human rights activists. The 179 countries ranked in this year’s index are those for which Reporters Without Borders received completed questionnaires from various sources. Some countries were not included because of a lack of reliable, confirmed data. A score and a position are assigned to each country in the final ranking. They are complementary indicators that together assess the state of press freedom. In order to make the index more informative and make it easier to compare different years, scores will henceforth range from 0 to 100, with 0 being the best possible score and 100 the worst. The index reflects the situation during a specific period. This year’s index is based solely on events between the start of December 2012 and the end of November 2013. It does not look at human rights violations in general, just violations of freedom of information. The index should in no way be taken as an indication of the quality of the media in the countries concerned. The range of score to access the press freedom.  From 0 to 15 points: Good From 15.01 to 25 points: Fairly good From 25.01 to 35 points: Problematic From 35.01 to 55 points: Bad From 55.01 to 100 points: Very bad