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India

  • President:Ram Nath Kovind
  • Prime Minister:Narendra Modi
  • Capital city:New Delhi
  • Languages:Hindi 41%, Bengali 8.1%, Telugu 7.2%, Marathi 7%, Tamil 5.9%, Urdu 5%, Gujarati 4.5%, Kannada 3.7%, Malayalam 3.2%, Oriya 3.2%, Punjabi 2.8%, Assamese 1.3%, Maithili 1.2%, other 5.9% note: English enjoys the status of subsidiary official language but is the most important language for national, political, and commercial communication; Hindi is the most widely spoken language and primary tongue of 41% of the people; there are 14 other official languages: Bengali, Telugu, Marathi, Tamil, Urdu, Gujarati, Malayalam, Kannada, Oriya, Punjabi, Assamese, Kashmiri, Sindhi, and Sanskrit; Hindustani is a popular variant of Hindi/Urdu spoken widely throughout northern India but is not an official language (2001 census)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:1,339,180,127 (2017)
  • Area, sq km:2,973,190 (2017)
  • GDP per capita, US$:1,940 (2017)
  • GDP, billion current US$:2,597.5 (2017)
  • GINI index:35.1 (2011)
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:100 (2017)
All datasets:  A C D G I N P
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    • May 2007
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2015
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      The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) is the only index that includes price data for 181 economies, which is vital in assessing effective market demand. The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) has been designed to as a tool for tracking progress in bridging the digital divide and the implementa- tion of the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS). As such, it provides a powerful policy tool for exploring the global and regional trends in infrastructure, opportu- nity and usage that are shaping the Information Society.
    • March 2016
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 April, 2016
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      1. ccTLDs stands for country code Top Level Domains. 2. gTLDs - stands for generic top-level domains.
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    • November 2018
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 January, 2019
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    • July 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 January, 2017
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      Data cited at: The World Economic Forum https://www.weforum.org/ Topic: The Global Information Technology Report 2016 Publication URL: https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-global-information-technology-report-2016 License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode   This Dataset contains proprietary and non-proprietary data used in the computation of the World Economic's Forum Networked Readiness Index. By making this data available, the Forum aims to inform multi-stakeholder dialogue, foster evidence-based, data-driven decisions, allow measuring progress, and support research by academia, journalists and others.
    • December 2014
      Source: World Wide Web Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
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      Data cited at: World Wide Web Foundation https://thewebindex.org/ Topic: Data, Web Index 2014 data Publication: https://thewebindex.org/data/?indicator=INDEX&country=ALL License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/   The Web has changed our lives. But to harness its full benefit, we need to understand how countries and people use it, and its impact on on development and human rights. The Web Index, by the World Wide Web Foundation, tracks the Web’s contribution to social, economic and political progress across 86 countries. It ranks these nations across four pillars: Universal Access, Freedom and Openness, Empowerment and Relevant Content.
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    • January 2008
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 September, 2014
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      ICT goods are those that are either intended to fulfil the function of information processing and communication by electronic means, including transmission and display, OR which use electronic processing to detect, measure and/or record physical phenomena, or to control a physical process. ICT goods are defined by the OECD in terms of the Harmonised System. The guiding principle for the delineation of ICT goods is that such goods must either be intended to fulfil the function of information processing and communication by electronic means, including transmission and display, OR use electronic processing to detect, measure and/or record physical phenomena, or to control a physical process.Another guiding principle was to use existing classification systems in order to take advantage of existing data sets and therefore ensure the immediate use of the proposed standard. In this case, the underlying system is the Harmonized System (HS). The HS is the only commodity classification system used on a sufficiently wide basis to support international data comparison. A large number of countries use it to classify export and import of goods, and many countries use it (or a classification derived from or linked to it) to categorise domestic outputs.The application of the ICT product definition to selection of in-scope HS categories is a somewhat subjective exercise. The fact that the HS is not built on the basis of the functionality of products makes it much more difficult. The distinction between products which fulfil those functions and products that simply embody electronics but fundamentally fulfil other functions is not always obvious.It is possible to adopt a narrow or broad interpretation of the guideline, though the OECD chose a broader interpretation, an approach which is consistent with that adopted to develop the ICT sector definition.
    • March 2016
      Source: UNESCO Institute for Statistics
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 30 March, 2016
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    • December 2016
      Source: Federal Communications Commission
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 April, 2017
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    • June 2015
      Source: McAfee
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 September, 2015
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      Cybercrime is a growth industry. The returns are great, and the risks are low. We estimate that the likely annual cost to the global economy from cybercrime is more than $400 billion.1 A conservative estimate would be $375 billion in losses, while the maximum could be as much as $575 billion. Even the smallest of these figures is more than the national income of most countries and governments and companies underestimate how much risk they face from cybercrime and how quickly this risk can grow.
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