An error occured. Details Hide
You have unsaved pages. Restore Cancel

India

  • President:Ram Nath Kovind
  • Prime Minister:Narendra Modi
  • Capital city:New Delhi
  • Languages:Hindi 41%, Bengali 8.1%, Telugu 7.2%, Marathi 7%, Tamil 5.9%, Urdu 5%, Gujarati 4.5%, Kannada 3.7%, Malayalam 3.2%, Oriya 3.2%, Punjabi 2.8%, Assamese 1.3%, Maithili 1.2%, other 5.9% note: English enjoys the status of subsidiary official language but is the most important language for national, political, and commercial communication; Hindi is the most widely spoken language and primary tongue of 41% of the people; there are 14 other official languages: Bengali, Telugu, Marathi, Tamil, Urdu, Gujarati, Malayalam, Kannada, Oriya, Punjabi, Assamese, Kashmiri, Sindhi, and Sanskrit; Hindustani is a popular variant of Hindi/Urdu spoken widely throughout northern India but is not an official language (2001 census)
  • Government
  • National statistics office
  • Population, persons:1,339,180,127 (2017)
  • Area, sq km:2,973,190 (2017)
  • GDP per capita, US$:1,940 (2017)
  • GDP, billion current US$:2,597.5 (2017)
  • GINI index:35.1 (2011)
  • Ease of Doing Business rank:100 (2017)
All datasets:  2 3 B C D E F G H I K L M O P R S T W Y
  • 2
    • June 2016
      Source: Deloitte
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 02 June, 2016
      Select Dataset
      With the release of the 2016 Global Manufacturing Competitiveness Index (GMCI), Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited (Deloitte Global) and the Council on Competitiveness (the Council) in the US build upon the GMCI research, with prior studies published in 2010 and 2013. The results of the 2016 study clearly show the ongoing influence manufacturing has on driving global economies. From its influence on infrastructure development, job creation, and contribution to gross domestic product (GDP) on both an overall and per capita basis, a strong manufacturing sector creates a clear path toward economic prosperity.
  • 3
  • B
    • April 2017
      Source: Bloom Consulting
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 May, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Bloom Consulting was founded in 2003 as a Nation Branding consultancy. Our Headquarters are located in Madrid, with offices in Lisbon and São Paulo. Bloom Consulting has been interviewed by The Economist, Forbes and CNN . According to Country Branding Central www.countrybrandingwiki.org, our CEO José Filipe Torres, a recurrent lecturer in Universities such as Harvard, is considered one of the top 3 international experts in the field of Nation Branding, Region and City Branding, providing advisory for the OECD. In addition, Bloom Consulting publishes the Bloom Consulting Country Brand Ranking © annually for both Trade and Tourism, to extensively analyze the brand performance of 193 countries and territories worldwide and the Digital Country Index - Measuring the Brand appeal of countries and territories in the Digital World.
    • June 2018
      Source: Times Higher Education
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 11 June, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The Times Higher Education Emerging Economies University Rankings 2018 includes only institutions in countries classified by the FTSE as “advanced emerging”, “secondary emerging” or “frontier”. its fifth year, the 2018 ranking parts with the ‘BRICS’ acronym in the title to recognise the strength and potential of a diverse range of emerging economies. The rankings use the same 13 performance indicators as the THE World University Rankings to judge institutions on their teaching, research, knowledge transfer and international outlook. But they are recalibrated to reflect the development priorities of universities in emerging economies. The performance indicators are grouped into five areas: 1. Teaching (the learning environment) 2. Research (volume, income and reputation) 3. Citations (research influence) 4. International outlook (staff, students and research) 5. Industry income (knowledge transfer) Note: The ranking of institutions, after 200, have been given in range like 201-250 and 251-300. The rank has been taken as 201, 202, 203……..250 as the same order as they appear in the source.
  • C
    • December 2016
      Source: Concordia
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 July, 2017
      Select Dataset
      THE CONCORDIA PARTNERSHIP Index (the Index) was developed as a tool for public, private, and nonprofit organizations to identify opportunities to form strategic partnerships and pool resources for the implementation of innovative ideas. The Index ranks countries based on their readiness and need to engage in public-private partnerships (P3s). The inclu- sion of the need indicators sets the Index apart from other indices that measure P3 environ- ments. While the success of a P3 depends on a country’s political and market structures, the Index recognizes that for a P3 to be truly impactful it must address a large-scale need.
    • February 2018
      Source: Transparency International
      Uploaded by: Pallavi S
      Accessed On: 27 February, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Data cited at CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX 2017 by Transparency International is licensed under CC-BY-ND 4.0. Global Corruption Barometer is the largest world-wide public opinion survey on corruption. see more at https://www.transparency.org/news/feature/corruption_perceptions_index_2017 Transparency International(TI) defines corruption as the abuse of entrusted power for private gain. This definition encompasses corrupt practices in both the public and private sectors. The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) ranks countries according to the perception of corruption in the public sector. The CPI is an aggregate indicator that combines different sources of information about corruption, making it possible to compare countries. The CPI ranks almost 200 countries by their perceived levels of corruption, as determined by expert assessments and opinion surveys.
    • June 2018
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The World Bank's Country Policy and Institutional Assessment is done annually for all its borrowing countries. It has evolved into a set of criteria, which are grouped in four clusters: (a) economic management; (b) structural policies; (c) policies for social inclusion and equity; and (d) public sector management and institutions. The number of criteria, currently sixteen, reflect a balance between ensuring that all key factors that foster pro-poor growth and poverty alleviation are captured, without overly burdening the evaluation process. Ratings for each of the criteria reflect a variety of indicators, observations, and judgments. They focus on the quality of each country's current policies and institutions - which are the main determinant of present aid effectiveness prospects. To fully underscore the importance of the CPIA in the IDA Performance Based Allocations, the overall country score is referred to as the IDA Resource Allocation Index (IRAI)
    • June 2018
      Source: Reputation Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Country RepTrak | Top Countries by ReputationThe Global RepTrak® 100 is a study that Reputation Institute conducts annually to measure the reputation of the world’s 100 most highly-regarded and familiar global companies in 15 countries. Included firms must meet the following qualifications: 1) Have a significant economic presence in the 15 largest economies 2) Have an above average reputation in its home country 3) Have global familiarity over 40% It is the largest Global reputation study, with ~170,000 ratings   Normative Scale for Reputation track pulse score Excellent/Top Tier: 80+ Strong/Robust: 70-79 Avg./Moderate: 60-69 Weak/Vulnerable: 40-59 Poor/Lowest: <40
    • August 2018
      Source: Numbeo
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 August, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Crime Index is an estimation of overall level of crime in a given city or a country. We consider crime levels lower than 20 as very low, crime levels between 20 and 40 as being low, crime levels between 40 and 60 as being moderate, crime levels between 60 and 80 as being high and finally crime levels higher than 80 as being very high. Safety index is, on the other way, quite opposite of crime index. If the city has a high safety index, it is considered very safe. Data cited at: https://www.numbeo.com/crime/rankings.jsp?title=2018.
  • D
    • May 2007
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 May, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) is the only index that includes price data for 181 economies, which is vital in assessing effective market demand. The Digital Opportunity Index (DOI) has been designed to as a tool for tracking progress in bridging the digital divide and the implementa- tion of the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS). As such, it provides a powerful policy tool for exploring the global and regional trends in infrastructure, opportu- nity and usage that are shaping the Information Society.
  • E
    • October 2017
      Source: Fraser Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 November, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The economic freedom index measures the degree of economic freedom present in five major areas: [1] Size of Government; [2] Legal System and Security of Property Rights; [3] Sound Money; [4] Freedom to Trade Internationally; [5] Regulation. Within the five major areas, there are 24 components (area) in economic freedom index. Each component and sub-component is placed on a scale from 0 to 10.
    • January 2018
      Source: Edelman
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Edelman Trust Barometer reveals that trust is in crisis around the world. The general population’s trust in all four key institutions — business, government, NGOs, and media — has declined broadly, a phenomenon not reported since Edelman began tracking trust among this segment in 2012. With the fall of trust, the majority of respondents now lack full belief that the overall system is working for them. In this climate, people’s societal and economic concerns, including globalization, the pace of innovation and eroding social values, turn into fears, spurring the rise of populist actions now playing out in several Western-style democracies. To rebuild trust and restore faith in the system, institutions must step outside of their traditional roles and work toward a new, more integrated operating model that puts people — and the addressing of their fears — at the center of everything they do.
    • December 2015
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Misha Gusev
      Select Dataset
      Calculated using Mean Years of Schooling and Expected Years of Schooling.
    • October 2017
      Source: InterNations
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 November, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Expat Insider is one of the largest surveys worldwide offered an in-depth analysis of expat life across the globe. Survey is done on more than 12,500 respondents representing 166 nationalities and living in 188 countries or territories, respondents provided unique insights into what it means to be an expat in 2017. The ranking of 65 destinations is based on how these countries were rated by their expat residents. For these ratings, the survey considered or looked at more than 40 individual factors that influence an expat’s experience of living in a foreign country, from family life to finances. The picture that emerges is an interesting one, with some of the results differing noticeably from other country rankings.
  • F
    • May 2018
      Source: Fund for Peace
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 15 May, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The FSI focuses on the indicators of risk and is based on thousands of articles and reports that are processed by our CAST Software from electronically available sources. Measures of fragility, like Demographic Pressures,Refugees and IDPs and etc., have been scaled on 0 to 10 where 10 is highest fragility and 0 no fragility.
  • G
    • February 2015
      Source: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 17 February, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The GID-DB is a database providing researchers and policymakers with key data on gender-based discrimination in social institutions. This data helps analyse women’s economic empowerment and understand gender gaps in other key areas of development. Covering 160 countries, the GID-DB contains comprehensive information on legal, cultural and traditional practices that discriminate against women and girls.
    • October 2015
      Source: HelpAge International
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The aim of the Index is both to capture the multidimensional nature of the quality of life and wellbeing of older people, and to provide a means by which to measure performance and promote improvements. We have chosen 13 different indicators for the four key domains of Income security, Health status, Capability, and Enabling environment. Domain 1: Income security The income security domain assesses people's access to a sufficient amount of income, and the capacity to use it independently, in order to meet basic needs in older age. Domain 2: Health status The three indicators used for the health domain provide information about physical and psychological wellbeing. Domain 3: Capability The employment and education indicators in this domain look at different aspects of the empowerment of older people. Domain 4: Enabling environment This domain uses data from Gallup World View to assess older people's perception of social connectedness, safety, civic freedom and access to public transport - issues older people have singled out as particularly important.
    • November 2016
      Source: DHL
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2016
      Select Dataset
      DHL released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI), a detailed analysis of the state of globalization around the world. The latest report, authored by internationally acclaimed globalization expert Professor Pankaj Ghemawat together with Steven A. Altman, shows that global connectedness, measured by cross-border flows of trade, capital, information and people, has recovered most of its losses incurred during the financial crisis. Especially the depth of international interactions – the proportion of interactions that cross national borders – gained momentum in 2013 after its recovery had stalled in the previous year. Nonetheless, trade depth, as a distinct dimension of globalization, continues to stagnate and the overall level of global connectedness remains quite limited, implying that there could be gains of trillions of US dollars if boosted in future years.
    • July 2017
      Source: International Telecommunication Union
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 13 September, 2017
      Select Dataset
        The Global Cybersecurity Index (GCI) is a survey that measures the commitment of Member States to cybersecurity in order to raise awareness. The GCI revolves around the ITU Global Cybersecurity Agenda (GCA) and its five pillars (legal, technical, organizational, capacity building and cooperation). For each of these pillars, questions were developed to assess commitment. Through consultation with a group of experts, these questions were weighted in order to arrive at an overall GCI score. The survey was administered through an online platform through which supporting evidence was also collected. One-hundred and thirty-four Member States responded to the survey throughout 2016. Member States who did not respond were invited to validate responses determined from open-source research. As such, the GCI results reported herein cover all 193 ITU Member States. The 2017 publication of the GCI continues to show the commitment to cybersecurity of countries around the world. The overall picture shows improvement and strengthening of all five elements of the cybersecurity agenda in various countries in all regions. However, there is space for further improvement in cooperation at all levels, capacity building and organizational measures. As well, the gap in the level of cybersecurity engagement between different regions is still present and visible. The level of development of the different pillars varies from country to country in the regions, and while commitment in Europe remains very high in the legal and technical fields in particular, the challenging situation in the Africa and Americas regions shows the need for continued engagement and support. In addition to providing the GCI score, this report also provides a set of illustrative practices that give insight into the achievements of certain countries.
    • February 2017
      Source: Global Democracy Ranking
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Democracy Ranking 2016 compares the development of quality of democracy in 112 countries during the years 2011-2012 with 2014-2015. It is based on the following dimensions: politics (weighted with 50%), economy (10%), ecology and environment (10%), gender equality (10%), health and health status (10%), and knowledge (10%). The possible values that a country can achieve go from 1 (minimum) to 100 (maximum) (the entire scale is thus 1-100). Rank change: + sign shows improvement in rank and - sign shows deterioration in rank
    • August 2015
      Source: Grant Thornton
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 October, 2015
      Select Dataset
      The Grant Thornton Global Dynamism Index (GDI) ranks 60 leading economies on their dynamism in five key areas – business operating environment, economics & growth, science & technology, labour & human capital and financing environment. The GDI analyses 22 indicators across these five categories to assess the dynamism of business growth environments around the world, where dynamism refers to the changes in an economy over the past 12 months which are likely to lead to a faster future rate of growth.
    • March 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 April, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Energy Architecture Performance Index (EAPI) uses a set of indicators to highlight the performance of various countries across each facet of their energy architecture, determining to what extent nations have been able to create affordable, sustainable and secure energy systems   1)Economic growth and development: The extent to which energy architecture supports, rather than detracts from, economic growth and development 2) Environmental sustainability: The extent to which energy architecture has been constructed to minimize negative environmental externalities 3) Energy access and security: The extent to which energy architecture is at risk of an energy security impact, and whether adequate access to energy is provided to all parts of the population   Note: For detail methodology please visit:"http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GlobalEnergyArchitecturePerformance_Index_2017.pdf"
    • January 2018
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 09 February, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The GEM Adult Population Survey (APS) measures the level and nature of entrepreneurial activity around the world. It is administered to a representative national sample of at least 2000 respondents. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.  
    • April 2018
      Source: Global Entrepreneurship Monitor
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 April, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The GEM National Expert Survey (NES) monitors the factors that are believed to have a significant impact on entrepreneurship, known as the Entrepreneurial Framework Conditions (EFCs). It is administered to a minimum of 36 carefully chosen 'experts' in each country. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor is the world's foremost study of entrepreneurship. Through a vast, centrally coordinated, internationally executed data collection effort, GEM is able to provide high quality information, comprehensive reports and interesting stories, to enhance the understanding of the entrepreneurial phenomenon.
    • October 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 29 November, 2017
      Select Dataset
      This data set provides the Index benchmarks national gender gaps on economic, political, education and health criteria, and provides country rankings that allow for effective comparisons across regions and income groups. The rankings are designed to create greater awareness among a global audience of the challenges posed by gender gaps and the opportunities created by reducing them. The methodology and quantitative analysis behind the rankings are intended to serve as a basis for designing effective measures for reducing gender gaps.
    • September 2018
      Source: Dual Citizen LLC
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 September, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The performance index of the 2018 GGEI is defined by 20 underlying indicators, each contained within one of the four main dimensions of leadership & climate change, efficiency sectors, markets & investment and the environment.   For more detail on our approach to aggregating these diverse data sources to define the composite indicators in the GGEI and its four main dimensions, as well as our approach to data selection, weighting and other issues associated with creating an index, please visit the Methodology section.
    • October 2017
      Source: International Food Policy Research Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 October, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Global Hunger Index, 2017   The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is a tool designed to comprehensively measure and track hunger globally, regionally, and by country. Each year, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) calculates GHI scores in order to assess progress, or the lack thereof, in decreasing hunger. The GHI is designed to raise awareness and understanding of regional and country differences in the struggle against hunger. Since 2015, GHI scores have been calculated using a revised and improved formula. The revision replaces child underweight, previously the sole indicator of child undernutrition, with two indicators of child undernutrition—child wasting and child stunting—which are equally weighted in the GHI calculation. The revised formula also standardizes each of the component indicators to balance their contribution to the overall index and to changes in the GHI scores over time. The 2016 GHI has been calculated for 118 countries for which data on the four component indicators are available and where measuring hunger is considered most relevant. GHI scores are not calculated for some higher income countries where the prevalence of hunger is very low. The GHI is only as current as the data for its four component indicators. This year's GHI reflects the most recent available country-level data and projections available between 2011 and 2016. It therefore reflects the hunger levels during this period rather than solely capturing conditions in 2016. The 1992, 2000, 2008, and 2016 GHI scores reflect the latest revised data for the four component indicators of the GHI. Where original source data were not available, the estimates of the GHI component indicators were based on the most recent data available. The four component indicators used to calculate the GHI scores draw upon data from the following sources: 1. Undernourishment: Updated data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) were used for the 1992, 2000, 2008, and 2016 GHI scores. Undernourishment data and projections for the 2016 GHI are for 2014-2016. 2. Child wasting and stunting: The child undernutrition indicators of the GHI—child wasting and child stunting—include data from the joint database of United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Bank, and additional data from WHO's continuously updated Global Database on Child Growth and Malnutrition; the most recent Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) reports; and statistical tables from UNICEF. For the 2016 GHI, data on child wasting and child stunting are for the latest year for which data are available in the period 2011-2015. 3. Child mortality: Updated data from the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation were used for the 1992, 2000, 2008, and 2016 GHI scores. For the 2016 GHI, data on child mortality are from 2015.   Note: Values for the years are taken as per below table.1Global Hunger Index Scores2Proportion of Undernourished in the Population (%)3Prevalence of Stunting in Children Under Five Years (%)4Prevalence of Wasting in Children Under Five Years(%)5Prevalence of underweight in children under five years (%)    Date for above indicators are taken as per below year ranges.Indicators12345DateRangeDateRangeDateRangeDateRangeDateRange19921990-199420152014-201620152012-201620152012-201619901988-199220001998-200220082007-200920082006-201020082006-201019951993-199720082006-201020001999-200120001998-200220001998-200220001998-200220172012-201619921991-199319921990-199419921990-199420052003-200719901988-199219901990-199219901988-199219901988-199220122009-201319951993-199719951994-199619951993-199719951993-199720112008-201220052003-200720052004-200620052003-200720052003-200720102005-201020152010-201620132014-201620132010-201420132010-201420092004-200920142009-201320122011-2013    20082003-200820132008-201220112010-2012    20072002-200719961988-199220102006-2008    20062001-200620011994-199820092005-2007    20042000-200520122005-201020082004-2006    19801977-198220112004-200920072003-2005    19971993-199820102003-200820062002-2004    20031999-200320092002-200720042001-2003        19801979-1981        19971995-1997        20032000-2002                 * 6. "Under-five Mortality  Rate(%)" year range has not been specified in source. GHI Severity Scale ≤ 9.9 low 10.0–19.9 moderate 20.0–34.9 serious 35.0–49.9 alarming 50.0 ≤ extremely alarming
    • July 2016
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 January, 2017
      Select Dataset
      This Dataset contains proprietary and non-proprietary data used in the computation of the World Economic's Forum Networked Readiness Index. By making this data available, the Forum aims to inform multi-stakeholder dialogue, foster evidence-based, data-driven decisions, allow measuring progress, and support research by academia, journalists and others.
    • June 2018
      Source: Global Open Data Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 June, 2018
      Select Dataset
    • December 2017
      Source: Milken Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 28 December, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Global Opportunity Index answers a pressing need for information that's vital to a thriving global economy like what policies can governments pursue to attract foreign direct investment (FDI), expand their economies, and accelerate job creation, what do multinational companies, other investors, and development agencies need to know before making large-scale, long-term capital commitments.   Methodology:  The GOI considers economic and financial factors that influence investment activities as well as key business, legal and regulatory policies that governments can modify to support and often drive investments. Overall, the GOI tracks countries’ performance on 51 variables aggregated in five categories, each measuring an aspect of the country’s attractiveness for investors.Economic Fundamentals (EF) indicates the current economic strength of a country vis-à-vis the global economic outlook. The assessment focuses on the country’s macro-performance, trade openness, quality and structure of the labor force, and modern infrastructure.Financial Services (FS) measures the size and access to financial services in a country by looking at the country’s financial infrastructure and access to credit.Business Perception (BP) measures explicit and implicit costs associated with business operations such as tax burden, transparency, etc.Institutional Framework (IF) measures the extent to which an individual country’s institutions provide a supportive network to businesses.International Standards and Policy (ISP) reflects the extent to which a country’s institutions, policies, and legal system facilitate international integration by following international standards. The assigned composite index value is the average score of the five categories (called component scores). Each variable is normalized from 0 to 10. Within each category, the normalized variables are given equal weight and aggregated, resulting in a normalized category score between 0, indicating the least favorable conditions for investment, and 10, signaling the most favorable. The index covers 133 countries. The index methodology is reviewed for each publication to reflect changes in data sources or other relevant adjustments.
    • March 2018
      Source: A. T. Kearney
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 06 April, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The Global Retail Development Index™ is an annual study that ranks the top 30 developing countries for retail expansion worldwide. The Index analyzes 25 macroeconomic and retail-specific variables to help retailers devise successful global strategies and to identify developing market investment opportunities. The GRDI is unique because it identifies today's most successful markets and those that offer the most potential for the future.
    • September 2018
      Source: Natixis
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 October, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The Global Retirement Index (GRI) is a multi-dimensional index developed by Natixis Global Asset Management and CoreData Research to examine the factors that drive retirement security and to provide a comparison tool for best practices in retirement policy. The index incorporates 18 performance indicators, grouped into four thematic sub-indices, which have been calculated on the basis of reliable data from a range of international organizations and academic sources. It takes into account the particular characteristics of the older demographic retiree group in order to assess and compare the level of retirement security in different countries around the world. The four thematic indices cover key aspects for welfare in retirement: the material means to live comfortably in retirement; access to quality financial services to help preserve savings value and maximize income; access to quality health services; and a clean and safe environment. The sub-indices provide insight into which particular characteristics are driving an improvement or worsening each country’s position. Data has been tracked consistently to provide a basis for year-over-year comparison. This is the fifth year Natixis Global Asset Management and CoreData have produced the GRI as a guide to the changing decisions facing retirees as they focus on their needs and goals for the future, and where and how to most efficiently preserve wealth while enjoying retirement. As the GRI continues to run each year, it is our hope it will be possible to discern ongoing trends in, for instance, the quality of a nation’s financial services sector, thereby identifying those variables that can be best managed to ensure a more secure retirement. The index includes International Monetary Fund (IMF) advanced economies, members of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). The researchers calculated a mean score in each category and combined the category scores for a final overall ranking of the 43 nations studied. The index is calculated as a percentage from 0% to 100% where 100% represents the most favorable environment to retirement security.
    • December 2014
      Source: World Wide Web Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 April, 2016
      Select Dataset
      The Web has changed our lives. But to harness its full benefit, we need to understand how countries and people use it, and its impact on on development and human rights. The Web Index, by the World Wide Web Foundation, tracks the Web’s contribution to social, economic and political progress across 86 countries. It ranks these nations across four pillars: Universal Access, Freedom and Openness, Empowerment and Relevant Content.
  • H
    • February 2017
      Source: United Nations Development Programme
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 April, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of achievements in three key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, access to knowledge and a decent standard of living. The HDI is the geometric mean of normalized indices for each of the the three dimensions.
  • I
    • November 2017
      Source: India Meteorological Department
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 January, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The IMD World Competitiveness Center is delighted to present its IMD World Talent Report 2017, which includes a talent ranking for all countries that are part of the IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook (63 countries as of 2017). The data are gathered from the Center’s extensive database, which encompasses 20 years of competitiveness-related data. In some sections of this report, we present a detailed discussion of the data (at the indicator level) from 2005 to 2017. In the indicator tables, however, we only present the 2017 data. All criteria employed in the development of this report can be accessed through the World Competitiveness Online website. The objective of the IMD World Talent Ranking is to assess the extent to which countries develop, attract and retain talent to sustain the talent pool available for enterprises operating in those economies. While the hard data used in this report have been gathered from various sources (see Appendix), the survey data were obtained from the Center’s executive opinion survey, designed for the World Competitiveness Yearbook.
    • February 2018
      Source: Heritage Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 23 February, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Economic freedom is the fundamental right of every human to control his or her own labor and property. In an economically free society, individuals are free to work, produce, consume, and invest in any way they please, with that freedom both protected by the state and unconstrained by the state. In economically free societies, governments allow labor, capital and goods to move freely, and refrain from coercion or constraint of liberty beyond the extent necessary to protect and maintain liberty itself. Economic Freedom Scores: Range and level of freedom 80–100:- Free 70–79.9:- Mostly Free 60–69.9:- Moderately Free 50–59.9:- Mostly Unfree 0–49.9:- Repressed
    • January 2006
      Source: Walter G. Park
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 July, 2016
      Select Dataset
      International patent protection: 1960–2005 Walter G. Park ∗ Department of Economics, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA Received 24 October 2007; received in revised form 14 December 2007; accepted 29 January 2008 Available online 10 March 2008 http://fs2.american.edu/wgp/www/res_policy08.pdf
    • October 2017
      Source: U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 September, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The mission of the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) is to provide the public with a reliable and convenient reporting mechanism to submit information to the FBI concerning suspected Internet-facilitated criminal activity and to develop effective alliances with industry partners. Information is processed for investigative and intelligence purposes for law enforcement and public awareness.
  • K
    • January 2012
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 August, 2013
      Select Dataset
      The World Bank’s Knowledge Assessment Methodology (KAM: www.worldbank.org/kam) is an online interactive tool that produces the Knowledge Economy Index (KEI)–an aggregate index representing a country’s or region’s overall preparedness to compete in the Knowledge Economy (KE). The KEI is based on a simple average of four subindexes, which represent the four pillars of the knowledge economy:  Economic Incentive and Institutional Regime (EIR)  Innovation and Technological Adoption  Education and Training  Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) Infrastructure The EIR comprises incentives that promote the efficient use of existing and new knowledge and the flourishing of entrepreneurship. An efficient innovation system made up of firms, research centers, universities, think tanks, consultants, and other organizations can tap into the growing stock of global knowledge, adapt it to local needs, and create new technological solutions. An educated and appropriately trained population is capable of creating, sharing, and using knowledge. A modern and accessible ICT infrastructure serves to facilitate the effective communication, dissemination, and processing of information.
  • L
    • May 2018
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 August, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The Logistics Performance Index overall score reflects assessments of a country's logistics based on efficiency of the customs clearance process, quality of trade- and transport-related infrastructure, ease of arranging competitively priced shipments, quality of logistics services, ability to track and trace consignments, and frequency with which shipments reach the consignee within the scheduled time. The index ranges from 1 to 5, with a higher score representing better performance. Data are from Logistics Performance Index surveys conducted by the World Bank in partnership with academic and international institutions and private companies and individuals engaged in international logistics. 2011 round of surveys covered more than 6,000 country assessments by nearly 1,000 international freight forwarders. Respondents evaluated eight markets on six core dimensions using a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best). The markets are chosen based on the most important export and import markets of the respondent's country, random selection, and, for landlocked countries, neighboring countries that connect them with international markets. Scores for the six areas are averaged across all respondents and aggregated to a single score using principal components analysis. Details of the survey methodology and index construction methodology are in Connecting to Compete 2012: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy (2012).
  • M
    • May 2018
      Source: globalEDGE
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 26 June, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Global marketing has become more and more important over the years with the increasing trend of internationalization. Faced with too many choices, marketers have the challenge of determining which international markets to enter and the appropriate marketing strategies for those countries. The purpose of this study is to rank, with a U.S. focus, the market potential of the largest economies and to provide guidance to the U.S. companies that plan to expand their markets internationally. While the U.S. is not included in the rankings, the insights provided by the index are still applicable to companies located in other international markets. This indexing study is conducted by the Michigan State University — International Business Center to help companies compare prospect markets on several dimensions. Eight dimensions are chosen to represent the market potential of a country on a scale of 1 to 100. The dimensions are measured using various indicators and are weighted in determining their contribution to the overall Market Potential Index(MPI). Between years 1996 and 2014, the MPI has been calculated for 26 countries identified as "Emerging Markets" by The Economist magazine. However, in order to cover a wider range of markets, a decision has been made in 2014 to increase the number of countries according to the criteria explained below.
    • October 2017
      Source: Melbourne Mercer
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 10 November, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Melbourne Mercer Global Pension index has become an important reference point in the debate about the adequacy, sustainability and integrity of retirement systems around the world. While some countries have well-established retirement systems that have stood the test of time, others are just developing, especially those within the Asian region. Regardless, as nations and policy makers struggle with the competing needs of an ageing population and achieving an appropriate fiscal balance, our hope is that this report will provide an opportunity for debate and discussion about possible alternative strategies. The Index uses three sub-indices —adequacy, sustainability and integrity — to measure each country's retirement income system. The overall index value for each country's system represents the weighted average of the three sub-indices. The weightings used are 40 percent for the adequacy sub-index, 35 percent for the sustainability sub-index and 25 percent for the integrity sub-index. The different weightings are used to reflect the primary importance of the adequacy sub-index which represents the benefits that are currently being provided together with some important benefit design features. The integrity sub-index considers several items that influence the overall governance and operations of the system which affects the level of confidence that the citizens of each country have in their system. 
  • O
    • November 2017
      Source: Ocean Health Index
      Uploaded by: Shakthi Krishnan
      Accessed On: 20 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Ocean Health Index
    • June 2018
      Source: Open Data Research Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 14 June, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Produced by the World Wide Web Foundation as a collaborative work of the Open Data for Development (OD4D) network and with the support of the Omidyar Network, the Open Data Barometer (ODB) aims to uncover the true prevalence and impact of open data initiatives around the world. It analyses global trends, and provides comparative data on countries and regions using an in-depth methodology that combines contextual data, technical assessments and secondary indicators. Covering 115 jurisdictions in the fourth edition, the Barometer ranks governments on:Readinessfor open data initiatives.Implementationof open data programmes.Impactthat open data is having on business, politics and civil society. After three successful editions, the fourth marks another step towards becoming a global policymaking tool with a participatory and inclusive process and a strong regional focus. This year’s Barometer includes an assessment of government performance in fulfilling the Open Data Charter principles. The Barometer is a truly global and collaborative effort, with input from more than 100 researchers and government representatives. It takes over six months and more than 10,000 hours of research work to compile. During this process, we address more than 20,000 questions and respond to more than 5,000 comments and suggestions.  
    • June 2016
      Source: Open Data Research Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 25 September, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Peer-reviewed numerical scores assigned to each primary data variable collected for the Open Data Barometer.
    • April 2018
      Source: Open Data Watch
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 April, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Score Type Options: Three sets of scores are available: raw, weighted, or standardized. Raw scores have values between 0 and 1 as recorded in the original assessment; subscores are simple totals. Weighted scores use a predefined weighting matrix; subscores are simple totals. Standardized scores are scaled from 0 to 100; subscores are weighted averages.
  • P
    • September 2017
      Source: Passport Index
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 13 September, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Passport Index is an interactive tool, which collects, displays and ranks the passports of the world. You can discover the world’s passports on a map, by country name, by Passport Power Rank and even by the color of their cover. Visa Free Score Passports accumulate points for each visa free country that their holders can visit without a visa, or they can obtain a visa on arrival. Passport Power Rank Passports are ranked based on their Visa Free Score. The higher the Visa Free Score, the better the Passport Power Rank. Methodology The country list is based on the 193 UN member countries and 6 territories (Macao, Kosovo, etc.) for a total of 199. Territories annexed to other countries such as Norfolk Island, French Polynesia, etc. are excluded. Data is based on research from publicly available sources, as well as information shared by government agencies.
    • September 2017
      Source: Political Terror Scale
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 November, 2017
      Select Dataset
      citation: Gib­ney, Mark, Linda Cor­nett, Reed Wood, Peter Hasch­ke, and Daniel Arnon. 2016. The Polit­ic­al Ter­ror Scale 1976-2015. Date Re­trieved, from the Polit­ic­al Ter­ror Scale website: ht­tp://www.polit­ic­al­ter­rorscale.org.   Political Terror Scale Levels 1 - Coun­tries un­der a se­cure rule of law, people are not im­prisoned for their views, and tor­ture is rare or ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murders are ex­tremely rare. 2 - There is a lim­ited amount of im­pris­on­ment for non­vi­ol­ent polit­ic­al activ­ity. However, few per­sons are af­fected, tor­ture and beat­ings are ex­cep­tion­al. Polit­ic­al murder is rare. 3 - There is ex­tens­ive polit­ic­al im­pris­on­ment, or a re­cent his­tory of such im­pris­on­ment. Ex­e­cu­tion or oth­er polit­ic­al murders and bru­tal­ity may be com­mon. Un­lim­ited de­ten­tion, with or without a tri­al, for polit­ic­al views is ac­cep­ted. 4 - Civil and polit­ic­al rights vi­ol­a­tions have ex­pan­ded to large num­bers of the pop­u­la­tion. Murders, dis­ap­pear­ances, and tor­ture are a com­mon part of life. In spite of its gen­er­al­ity, on this level ter­ror af­fects those who in­terest them­selves in polit­ics or ideas. 5 - Ter­ror has ex­pan­ded to the whole pop­u­la­tion. The lead­ers of these so­ci­et­ies place no lim­its on the means or thor­ough­ness with which they pur­sue per­son­al or ideo­lo­gic­al goals.
    • June 2018
      Source: PYPL
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 July, 2018
      Select Dataset
  • R
  • S
    • June 2014
      Source: Scimago Lab
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 04 June, 2014
      Select Dataset
      The SIR reports are not league tables. The ranking parameter –the scientific output of institutions- should be understood as a default rank, not our ranking proposal. The only goal of this report is to characterize research outcomes of organizations so as to provide useful scientometric information to institutions, policymakers and research manager so they are able to analyze, evaluate and improve their research results. If someone uses this report to rank institutions or to build a league table with any purpose, he/she will do it under his/her own responsibility. Output - Total number of documents published in scholarly journals indexed in Scopus (Romo-Fernández, et al., 2011). International Collaboration - Institution's output ratio produced in collaboration with foreign institutions. The values are computed by analyzing an institution's output whose affiliations include more than one country address (Guerrero-Bote, Olmeda-Gómez and Moya-Anegón, 2013; Lancho-Barrantes, Guerrero-Bote and Moya-Anegón, 2013; Lancho-Barrantes, et al., 2013; Chinchilla-Rodríguez, et al., 2012) Normalized Impact - Normalized Impact is computed using the methodology established by the Karolinska Intitutet in Sweden where it is named "Item oriented field normalized citation score average". The normalization of the citation values is done on an individual article level. The values (in %) show the relationship between an institution's average scientific impact and the world average set to a score of 1, --i.e. a NI score of 0.8 means the institution is cited 20% below world average and 1.3 means the institution is cited 30% above average (Rehn and Kronman, 2008; González-Pereira, Guerrero-Bote and Moya- Anegón, 2011). High Quality Publications - Ratio of publications that an institution publishes in the most influential scholarly journals of the world, those ranked in the first quartile (25%) in their categories as ordered by SCImago Journal Rank (SJRII) indicator (Miguel, Chinchilla-Rodríguez and Moya-Anegón, 2011). Specialization Index - The Specialization Index indicates the extent of thematic concentration /dispersion of an institution’s scientific output. Values range between 0 and 1, indicating generalist vs. specialized institutions respectively. This indicator is computed according to the Gini Index used in Economy (Moed, et. al., 2011; López-Illescas, Moya-Anegón and Moed, 2011; Arencibia-Jorge et al., 2012). In this indicator, when the value is 0 it means that the data are not sufficient to calculate. Excellence Rate - Excellence rate indicates the amount (in %) of an institution’s scientific output that is included into the set of the 10% of the most cited papers in their respective scientific fields. It is a measure of high quality output of research institutions (SCImago Lab, 2011; Bornmann, Moya-Anegón and Leydesdorff, 2012; Guerrero-Bote and Moya-Anegón, 2012). Scientific Leadership - Leadership indicates an institution’s “output as main contributor”, that is the number of papers in which the corresponding author belongs to the institution (Moya-Anegón, 2012; Moya-Anegón et. al, 2013; Moya-Anegón, et al., forthcoming) Excellence with Leadership - Excellence with Leadership indicates the amount of documents in the Excellence rate in which the institution is the main contributor (Moya-Anegón, et al., 2013).
    • June 2017
      Source: Social Progress Imperative
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 29 June, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Social Progress Index is an aggregate index of social and environmental indicators that capture three dimensions of social progress: Basic Human Needs, Foundations of Wellbeing, and Opportunity. The 2017 Social Progress Index includes data from 128 countries on 50 indicators.
    • February 2018
      Source: Fraser Institute
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies was sent to approximately 4,100 exploration, development, and other mining-related companies around the world. Several mining publications and associations also helped publicize the survey. The survey, conducted from October 9, 2012, to January 6, 2013, represents responses from 742 of those companies. The companies participating in the survey reported exploration spending of US$6.2 billion in 2012 and US$ 5.4 billion in 2011.
  • T
    • November 2015
      Source: Save the Children Federation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 07 December, 2015
      Select Dataset
    • March 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 March, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Enabling Trade Index (ETI) was developed within the context of the World Economic Forum’s Transportation Industry Partnership program, and was first published in The Global Enabling Trade Report 2008. The ETI measures the extent to which individual economies have developed institutions, policies, and services facilitating the free flow of goods over borders and to destination. The structure of the Index reflects the main enablers of trade, breaking them into four overall issue areas, captured in the subindexes: 1) The market access subindex measures the extent to which the policy framework of the country welcomes foreign goods into the economy and enables access to foreign markets for its exporters. 2) The border administration subindex assesses the extent to which the administration at the border facilitates the entry and exit of goods. 3) Infrastructure subindex takes into account whether the country has in place the transport and communications infrastructure necessary to facilitate the movement of goods within the country and across the border. 4) The business environment subindex looks at the quality of governance as well as at the overarching regulatory and security environment impacting the business of importers and exporters active in the country. Each of these four subindexes is composed in turn of a number of pillars of enabling trade, of which there are seven in all. These are: 1) Domestic market access; 2) Foreign market access; 3) Efficiency and transparency of border administration; 4) Availability and quality of transport infrastructure; 5) Availability and quality of transport services; 6) Availability and use of ICTs; 7) Operating environment. Each indicator and sub-indicator is given a score on a scale of 1 to 7 that corresponds to the worst and best possible outcome, respectively.
    • September 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 September, 2017
      Select Dataset
    • February 2015
      Source: Keele University
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 April, 2015
      Select Dataset
      This water poverty index is a first pass at trying to establish an international measure comparing performance in the water sector across countries in a holistic way that brings in the diverse aspects and issues that are relevant. It does seem to give some sensible results but it does not pretend to be definitive nor offer a totally accurate measure of the situation.
    • July 2013
      Source: Ipsos
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 September, 2013
      Select Dataset
    • March 2017
      Source: Bloomberg
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 27 November, 2017
      Select Dataset
      To identify the healthiest countries in the world, Bloomberg Rankings created health scores and health-risk scores for countries with populations of at least 1 million. The risk score was subtracted from the health score to determine the country''s rank. Five-year averages, when available, were used to mitigate some of the short-term year-over-year swings.
    • December 2013
      Source: Strategy&
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 24 December, 2013
      Select Dataset
    • June 2018
      Source: Pew Research Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 22 August, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Levels of restrictions on religion Government Restrictions Index Very high- 6.6 to 10.0 High- 4.5 to 6.5 Moderate - 2.4 to 4.4 Low- 0.0 to 2.3 Social Hostilities Index Very high- 7.2 to 10.0 High- 3.6 to 7.1 Moderate- 1.5 to 3.5 Low- 0.0 to 1.4
  • W
    • April 2017
      Source: World Economic Forum
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 21 April, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The rise of travel and tourism has shown significant resilience globally. Despite slow economic growth in advanced economies and geopolitical tensions in some regions, the T&T sector still accounts for a large part of the global economy (estimated to be approximately 9% of global GDP or US$ 7 trillion) and employment,while the number of international travellers continues to increase. According to the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), the T&T sector is forecast to continue growing at 4% annually—faster than financial services,transport and manufacturing
    • October 2012
      Source: World Wide Fund for Nature
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 16 February, 2016
      Select Dataset
      Domestic ivory market score: Scores range from –4, indicating no or very small, highly-regulated domestic ivory markets and carving industries, to 20, indicating extremely large, completely unregulated domestic ivory markets and carving industries. As described in CoP13 Doc.29,2 Annex, this component is based upon a cumulative scoring system which tracks the relative scale of the retail-level trade, the degree of control over such trade, and the status of ivory carving. Law enforcement effort ratio: Number of in-country seizures divided by total number of seizures linked to that country 1999-2010. Total weight of recent ivory seizures: Total weight of ivory seizures linked to that country 1999-2010. Organized crime indicator: Percentage of seizure cases linked to that country 1999-2010 of more than 1,000 kg in weight, indicative of involvement of organized crime in the movement of ivory.
    • October 2017
      Source: World Bank
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 November, 2017
      Select Dataset
      Note: Overall DTF has been taken latest value from all DTF methodologies. This has been done to keep continuous series of DTF. Doing Business 2018: Reforming to Create Jobs, a World Bank Group flagship publication, is the 15th in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 190 economies—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe—and over time. Doing Business measures regulations affecting 11 areas of the life of a business. Ten of these areas are included in this year’s ranking on the ease of doing business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts and resolving insolvency. Doing Business also measures labor market regulation, which is not included in this year’s ranking. Data in Doing Business 2018 are current as of June 1, 2017. The indicators are used to analyze economic outcomes and identify what reforms of business regulation have worked, where and why. Main Findings Doing Business 2018: Reforming to Create Jobs finds that entrepreneurs in 119 economies saw improvements in their local regulatory framework last year. Between June 2016 and June 2017, the report, which measures 190 economies worldwide, documented 264 business reforms. Reforms reducing the complexity and cost of regulatory processes in the area of starting a business and getting credit were the most common in 2016/17. The next most common reforms were in the area of trading across borders. Read about business reforms. Brunei Darussalam, Thailand, Malawi, Kosovo, India, Uzbekistan, Zambia, Nigeria, Djibouti and El Salvador were the most improved economies in 2016/17 in areas tracked by Doing Business. Together, these 10 top improvers implemented 53 regulatory reforms making it easier to do business. Economies in all regions are implementing reforms easing the process of doing business, but Europe and Central Asia continues to be the region with the highest share of economies implementing at least one reform—79% of economies in the region have implemented at least one business regulatory reform, followed by South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The report features four case studies in the areas of starting a business, dealing with construction permits, registering property and resolving insolvency, as well as an annex on labor market regulation.
    • May 2018
      Source: IMD World Competitiveness Center
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 01 June, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The IMD World Competitiveness Yearbook analyzes and ranks the ability of a country to facilitate an environment in which enterprises can generate sustainable value.
    • February 2018
      Source: World Energy Council
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 20 February, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The World Energy Council’s Energy Trilemma Index tool, produced in partnership with Oliver Wyman, ranks countries on their ability to provide sustainable energy through 3 dimensions: Energy security, Energy equity (accessibility and affordability), Environmental sustainability. The ranking measures overall performance in achieving a sustainable mix of policies and the balance score highlights how well a country manages the trade-offs of the Trilemma with "A" being the best.
    • March 2018
      Source: Sustainable Development Solutions Network
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 March, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The World Happiness Report is a landmark survey of the state of global happiness. The World Happiness Report 2018, ranks 156 countries by their happiness levels, and 117 countries by the happiness of their immigrants. The main focus of this year’s report, in addition to its usual ranking of the levels and changes in happiness around the world, is on migration within and between countries. The overall rankings of country happiness are based on the pooled results from Gallup World Poll surveys from 2015-2017, and show both change and stability. There is a new top ranking country, Finland, but the top ten positions are held by the same countries as in the last two years, although with some swapping of places. Four different countries have held top spot in the four most recent reports- Denmark, Switzerland, Norway and now Finland. All the top countries tend to have high values for all six of the key variables that have been found to support well-being: income, healthy life expectancy, social support, freedom, trust and generosity. Among the top countries, differences are small enough that that year-to-year changes in the rankings are to be expected. The analysis of happiness changes from 2008-2010 to 2015-2015 shows Togo as the biggest gainer, moving up 17 places in the overall rankings from the last place position it held as recently as in the 2015 rankings. The biggest loser is Venezuela, down 2.2 points on the 0 to 10 scale.
    • April 2014
      Source: The Earth Institute, Columbia University
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 03 April, 2014
      Select Dataset
      The World Happiness Report 2013 is a study conducted by Columbia University's Earth Institute and published in September 2013 by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN). It reveals trends in the data judging just how happy countries really are on a scale running from 0 to 10. The report uses data from people in over 150 countries, surveyed by Gallup over the period 2010-12. Six key variables explain three-quarters of the variation in annual national average scores over time and among countries. These six factors include: real GDP per capita, healthy life expectancy, having someone to count on, perceived freedom to make life choices, freedom from corruption, and generosity. Note: datapoints for 2012 and 2007 refer to national averages in 2010-12 and 2005-07 correspondingly; changes from 2005-07 to 2010-12 are presented for the 130 countries with data in both periods; positive affect in 2005-07 does not include happiness (yesterday) since happiness data were not collected in the period. Reference: World Happiness Report 2013, Appendix material for Chapter 2 "World Happiness:  Trends, Explanations and Distribution", John F. Helliwell & Shun Wang.
    • May 2018
      Source: Reporters Without Borders
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 18 May, 2018
      Select Dataset
      The press freedom index that Reporters Without Borders publishes every year measures the level of freedom of information in nearly 180 countries. It reflects the degree of freedom that journalists, news organizations and netizens enjoy in each country, and the efforts made by the authorities to respect and ensure respect for this freedom. It is based partly on a questionnaire that is sent to our partner organizations (18 freedom of expression NGOs located in all five continents), to our network of 150 correspondents, and to journalists, researchers, jurists and human rights activists. The 179 countries ranked in this year’s index are those for which Reporters Without Borders received completed questionnaires from various sources. Some countries were not included because of a lack of reliable, confirmed data. A score and a position are assigned to each country in the final ranking. They are complementary indicators that together assess the state of press freedom. In order to make the index more informative and make it easier to compare different years, scores will henceforth range from 0 to 100, with 0 being the best possible score and 100 the worst. The index reflects the situation during a specific period. This year’s index is based solely on events between the start of December 2012 and the end of November 2013. It does not look at human rights violations in general, just violations of freedom of information. The index should in no way be taken as an indication of the quality of the media in the countries concerned. The range of score to access the press freedom.  From 0 to 15 points: Good From 15.01 to 25 points: Fairly good From 25.01 to 35 points: Problematic From 35.01 to 55 points: Bad From 55.01 to 100 points: Very bad  
    • January 2018
      Source: Bloomberg
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 12 October, 2018
      Select Dataset
      Bloomberg innovation index ranks countries and sovereigns based on their overall ability to innovate. It considers six equally weighted metrics, and their scores are combined to provide an overall score for each country from zero to 100. 1. Research & Development: Research and development expenditure as a percentage of GDP 2. Manufacturing: Manufacturing value-added per capita 3. Productivity: GDP and GNI per employed person age 15+ 4. High-tech companies: Number of domestically domiciled high-tech public companies—such as aerospace and defense, biotechnology, hardware, software, semiconductors, Internet software and services, and renewable energy companies – as a share of world's total high-tech public companies 5. Tertiary efficiency: Total enrolment in tertiary education, regardless of age, as a percentage of postsecondary cohort; minimum share of labor force with at least tertiary degrees; annual new science and engineering graduates as a percentage of the labor force and as a percentage of total tertiary graduates 6. Researcher concentration: Professionals, including Ph.D. students, engaged in R&D per 1 million population 7. Patents: Resident utility patent filings per 1 million population and per $1 million of R&D spent; utility patents granted as a percentage of world total Bloomberg innovation index evaluated more than 200 countries of which only 78 had data for at least six of the seven factors. Postsecondary education and patent activity consisted of multiple factors that were weighted equally. Weights were rescaled for countries with some but not all of the factors in those two metrics. The ranking shows only those countries included in the top 50.
  • Y
    • January 2016
      Source: City Foundation
      Uploaded by: Knoema
      Accessed On: 19 May, 2017
      Select Dataset
      The Youth Economic Strategy (YES) Index is part of a Citi Foundation initiative that aims to inspire policymakers, the private sector and key stakeholders to improve opportunities for youth aged 13 to 25. The YES index, which was commissioned by the Citi Foundation and created by The Economist Intelligence Unit, evaluates the economic environment for youth in 35 cities across the world by measuring the drivers and enablers which promote youth economic opportunities- that is, the prospect that a young person can improve his/her economic situation. The index is based on 31 indicators, both quantitative and qualitative and mostly city-based, and offers a robust and comprehensive look at youth-focused policies around the world. The research was conducted between January 2015 and May 2015. Note : Score Range: Score 70.1-100 = Advanced, 50.1-70 = Progressing, 30.1-50 = Emerging, 0-30 = Nascent