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In this dashboard, we have integrated the most recent medium and long-term forecasts of key economic indicators for G20 countries from major international organizations, namely, the World Bank, IMF, United Nations, OECD, European Commission and the Economist Intelligence Unit. The data presented covers projections of real GDP growth, characterizing each country's output of final goods and services; consumer price inflation, as a measure of price level movements; unemployment rate, or percent of those willing and able to work but cannot find it; current account balance, providing an idea of a country's position in the international exchange; and, government debt, showing the relative value of government liabilities, which could affect a country's stability and confidence level. 

Analysis, based on such cross-sectional data, gives a comprehensive picture of a country's performance in the "open-economy" conditions, which is becoming even more comprehensive with the use of a diverse collection of information sources. Each provider of forecasts makes its projections based on different assumptions concerning fiscal and monetary policies of the countries under review, interest and exchange rates, oil and non-oil commodity prices and so on. Taking all these factors into consideration could well help to build on even more robust future projections.

 

For analysis of other G20 economies, select a country page:

Argentina | Australia | Brazil | Canada | China | EU | Euro Area | France | Germany | India | Indonesia | Italy | Japan | Mexico | Russia | Saudi Arabia | South Africa | South Korea | Turkey | UK

Or, select an economic indicator:

GDP forecast | inflation forecast | unemployment forecast | current account balance forecast | government debt forecast | short term economic profile

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